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2005 

Annual Town Report 




Town of Andover 



Massachusetts 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2005 ANNUAL REPORT 



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PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO TAKEN AT MEMORIAL PROGRAM 
ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 1 1 th 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

2005 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 9 

ANTMAL INSPECTION Ill 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 107 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 47 

BUILDING DIVISION 47 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 49 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 48 

HEALTH DIVISION 50 

PLANNING DIVISION 53 

PLUMBING & GAS 48 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 54 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 78 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 16 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 20 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 82 

FINANCE & BUDGET 28 

ASSESSORS 30 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 28 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 30 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 31 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 115 

FIRE-RESCUE DEPARTMENT 44 

FOUNDERS' DAY 25 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 105 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 110 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 21 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 24 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 98 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 112 

MARGARET G. TO WLE FUND 112 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 74 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 58 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 59 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 59 

FORESTRY 63 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 64 

PARKS & GROUNDS 62 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 63 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 64 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 39 

ANIMAL CONTROL 40 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 40 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 41 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 39 

RECORDS DIVISION 39 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 109 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 67 

ENGINEERING 67 

HIGHWAY 69 

SEWER 71 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 72 

WATER 69 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 96 

TOWN CLERK 36 

TOWN COUNSEL 35 

TOWN MANAGER 3 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 135 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 113 

VETERANS SERVICES 90 

WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU , 179 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 84 



Town of Andover 

Board of Selectmen 



2005 




2005 Board of Selectmen, from left to right: John P. Hess; Mary K. Lyman; 
Ted E. Teichert, Chairman; Alex J. Vispoli; and Brain P. Major 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures 

of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and energy 

allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Dear Andover Citizens: 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 



As I reflect on the past year, I am truly amazed at how many significant things have 
occurred in such a short period of time. It has been another busy year as Town officials have 
worked diligently together to continue to provide high quality services to the citizens of Andover in 
light of a lagging economy and diminished State Aid. 

A couple of major multi-year sewer and water treatment projects were successfully 
completed. Unfortunately, the proposal to build a new Senior Center failed by a few votes at the 
Annual Town Meeting and again at a Special Town Meeting in the Fall. Regardless of the outcome, 
the volunteer Senior Center Task Force gave countless hours of their time over the course of three 
years to develop the proposal. They set a very high standard for future building projects in regards 
to the critical elements of process, cooperation and community input. 

The Board of Selectmen also re-appointed Town Manager Buzz Stapczynski to a fourth term 
with unanimous recognition and appreciation for his fifteen years of faithful service to the Town. 
We are blessed with many dedicated Town employees and thank them for their commitment to our 
community. 

There are many important issues facing us in the year ahead. The Board will be working 
closely with the Andover Youth Foundation in an effort to site a new Youth Center in the parking 
lot behind Doherty Middle School. Wc will also be working to advance a number of important 
projects for Andover such as the Main Street Improvement Project; the 1-93 Interchange Project; the 
capping of the Ledge Road Landfill; and the completion of the Reichhold Land Acquisition. 

As always, the Board of Selectmen. School Committee, Finance Committee, Town and 
School administration and Department Heads will continue to work cooperatively to address the 
various needs of our community. We are committed to providing a high quality school system for 
our children as well as a safe, well-maintained and affordable community. 

Andover is made up of many fine people who volunteer their time and effort to make the 
community a better place. The Town has a variety of volunteer boards and committees that need 
committed citizens to serve on them. You can find out more about these volunteer opportunities on 
the Town's website at andoverma.uox /boards talentbank.php Finally, I highly encourage you to 
participate in a time-honored tradition and attend the Annual Town Meeting that will begin on April 
24 th at the Andover High School Filed House. As residents, you ultimately decide what kind of 
Andover you want for today and the years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ted E. Teichert, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover.MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

w w w.andoverma. °ov 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

The year 2005 was one in which projects started in previous years were completed or 
near completion as the year ended. The Public Safety Center was "officially" opened in October. 
This significant event came as a result of the Town's dogged determination to get the best 
possible product out of the Commonwealth's public construction laws. The Water Treatment 
Plant Ozone Replacement Project was completed in the Spring and was on time and under 
budget. The last contract of the Town's multi-phased Sewer Construction Project was 90% 
completed in December. The contractor finished all sewer line installation in the roads and only 
cross country work in easements remain for 2006. When this project is finished in 2006, a total 
of 1,600 homes will be able to connect to the sanitary sewer system. 

The voters at the Annual Town Election, a rite of passage in March, re-elected James D. 
Doherty as Moderator for the twenty-ninth time. The voters also re-elected Mary K. Lyman to 
another term on the Board of Selectmen. Dr. Samuel S. Samuels was elected to the School 
Committee filling the vacancy left by Christopher G. Smith. 

Town Moderator James D. Doherty, Margaret "Peggy" Keck and Nate Smith were all 
honored at this year's Annual Town Meeting as the Virginia Cole Community Service Award 
recipients for 2005. Peggy and Nate were recognized for their tireless work on behalf of 
A.V.I.S., one of the oldest and best land trusts in the nation. Jim was recognized for his seventy 
plus years of service to the Town including twenty-nine years as Town Moderator. 

There were several notable warrant articles at this year's Annual Town Meeting. Town 
Meeting members appropriated a Budget of over $114 million. They rejected the appropriation 
of $7.65 million for a new Senior Center on the ballfield next to the Doherty Middle School on 
Bartlet Street. Voters did approve the next phase of the Water Treatment Plant Improvement 
Project by appropriating $6.5million for the construction of two new filter units, the retrofit and 
repair of the existing filter units and the replacement of the backwash pumping station. Town 
Meeting also established an affordable housing trust fund and Board of Trustees as a means of 
preserving the Town's investment in affordable housing and as a vehicle for receiving gifts, 
grants and land for these purposes. 

Upon receipt of a petition, the Board of Selectmen called a Special Town Meeting for 
September to reconsider the question of the proposed Senior Center on Bartlet Street. The 
Special Town Meeting did not approve the Senior Center warrant article. 



During the year, the Town received good news and a stern warning from Moody's 
Investors Service. The rating agency re-confirmed the Town's Aaa bond rating but it was done 
with a "negative outlook". This action was taken to draw attention to the Town's practice of 
using Free Cash and other reserves to balance the annual budget. 

The Selectmen continued their citizens' outreach by hosting two Budget Forums in 
February and the Second Annual Department Information Overview in September. At the 
Information Overview, eleven departments/division presented detailed information about the 
services and programs they provide. 

The Assistant Town Manager made significant improvements to the Town's website - 
www .ando verma. gov - including the addition of meeting agendas, a wide array of permits and 
forms and department/division frequently asked questions. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Brian P. Major, who chaired the Board of 
Selectmen from January to April, and Ted E. Teichert, who chaired the Board for the remainder 
of the year, for their leadership, advice and counsel. Also, the volunteer members of boards and 
committees deserve a very special "thank you" for their dedication to making Andover a great 
place for residents of all ages to live, work and enjoy the outdoors! 

In closing, please remember to participate in Andover' s tradition of voting in the Annual 
Town Election on Tuesday, March 28 th and the Annual Town Meeting on Monday and Tuesday, 
April 27 th and 28 th and, if needed, Monday, May 1 st . 



Respectfully submitted, 




fginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1 .3 Maintain the Town's infrastructure 

1 .4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 .5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1 .7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1.8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2.1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3.1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment of 
trust and honesty 

4.1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 -Respect cultural and 
economic diversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6.1 Celebrate Andover' s unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge. Hood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scjIc. 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andovci u> small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern oursches in a manner ilui cncouuccs 
participation by all. that consistent!} provide* jdcqujtc 
information for making informed choices, and ilut jit> In 
preserve our investment and the interests of the communii . .i- .i 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of other!) and uhimJci 
compromises that arc in the best interest ol the lown jnd 
region. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 



HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover's historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover's many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



2004 Andover National Citizen Survey Summary 

In the Spring of 2004 the Town of Andover conducted the National Citizen Survey (NCS) process. 
The NCS is a standardized, professionally administered, local public opinion survey instrument 
developed by the International City Management Association (ICMA) and a panel of experts to be 
broadly applicable to any city or town. The NCS has been conducted by more than 300 communities 
across the country, and has won a number of awards for excellence. It assesses public opinion on a 
wide variety of municipal services and quality of life issues. 

The Andover NCS was mailed to a random sampling of 1,200 households in March 2004 using the 
U.S. Postal Service's residential address listing. Completed surveys were returned by 646 residents, 
representing a 56% response rate. The results of the survey represent a statistically valid sampling of 
the opinions of the overall Andover community at-large. The survey's margin of error was +/- 5%, 
with a 95% level of confidence that the results would be similar if every residence in Andover 
responded to the survey. Listed below are summaries of the key findings of the survey: 



Top 10 Ten Quality Ratings 

1. Ambulance/EMS Services 

2. Fire Services 

3. Public Library Services 

4. Andover as a Place to Live 

5. Andover as a Place to Raise Children 

6. Police Services 

7. Trash Collection 

8. Neighborhood as a Place to Live 

9. Recycling 

10. Town Employee Courtesy 



Lowest 10 Quality Ratings 

1 . Access to Affordable Housing 

2. Services to Low-income People 

3. Amount of Public Parking 

4. Ease of Bus Travel 

5. Street Repair 

6. Sidewalk Maintenance 

7. Andover as a Place to Retire 

8. Access to Affordable Child Care 

9. Land Use, Planning, and Zoning 

10. Bus/Transit Services 



Top 5 Town of Andover Values 

1 . Protect the Safety of Persons and Property 

2. Maintain the High Quality of Education 

3. Maintain the Town's Infrastructure 

4. Encourage an Ethical and Honest 
Environment 

5. Provide Accessible, Fair, and Equitable 
Services 



Top 5 Reasons for Moving/Remaining 
in Andover 

1 . Property Values/Investment 

2. Public Schools 

3. Geographic Location/ Accessibility 

4. Small Town Ambiance and Lifestyle 

5. Town Services 



The results of Andover's NCS are not surprising. Andover received most of its highest "quality" 
ratings in areas typically associated with affluent suburbs; and most of its lowest ratings for services 
more often associated with urban communities. 

The full results of the NCS are provided in two separate reports - one explains the survey's 
methodology and shows the ratings for all the questions in graphical and tabular formats; the other is a 
normative report that compares Andover's results against the averages of other communities across the 
U.S. Andover's nation-wide comparative results in the 65 areas surveyed were as follows: 50 areas 
were above average; 8 areas were average; and 5 areas were below average. Both reports and results 
summaries are available on the Town's website at htt p: andoverma.gov/ pubiish/ncsurvev.php 



The Town intends to use the results of the NCS as a reference source for reshaping existing and 
developing new municipal programs, activities and services that meet the needs and expectations of the 
residents of Andover. The Town also plans to conduct the NCS every 3 to 5 years in order to assess 
changes in community opinion over time. 7 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 
several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1 ) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; 4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 

MEMORANDUM 



TO: Board of Selectmen 

FROM: Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 

SUBJ: 2005 Highlights/Accomplishments 

DATE : December 3 1 , 2005 




TOWN MANAGER / BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

At the Annual Town Election, Mary K. Lyman was re-elected to the Board. 

The Board re-appointed Buzz Stapczynski as Town Manager for another five-year term. 

The Board hosted a Department Information Overview at Memorial Hall Library where 
Department and Division Heads presented the services and programs they offer to the 
community. 

Town Budget Forums were held in March to give the public an overview of the Town budget 
and receive questions, comments and recommendations. 

The Town's website - www.nr.dcui-rmj/.M v - was re-organized thanks to the efforts of the 
Assistant Town Manager. 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The Town was again awarded a Aaa bond rating from Moody's Investors Service. The Town 
was warned about its practice of drawing down on reserves (Free Cash) by a "negative 
outlook" designation as part of the rating. 

The Assessing Division successfully completed the Town-wide property re-valuation. 

The Purchasing Division/Insurance Coordinator received $29,827 in insurance credits for the 
active Town and School participation in the MIIA Loss Prevention Training Program. 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

The Town was awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting 
for its FY-2004 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). 



The Town Accountant drafted and implemented a Town-authorized travel policy, continued 
planning for the implementation of GASB 45 - Accounting and Financial Reporting for 
Post-employment Benefits Others than Pensions and completed the FY-2005 audit. 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Hired 138 School personnel and 84 Town personnel for a variety of full and part-time, 
permanent and seasonal and substitute teaching vacancies. 

Sponsored the Annual Wellness Fair and held workshops to assist employees understand the 
real cost of consumer's health insurance and health care decisions. 

Assisted with the contract negotiations for all School Department unions and the Town's 
Independent Employee Association. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department, Fire and Rescue Department and Plant and Facilities Department 
dedicated the Public Safety Center on October 22 nd . 

Received State of Massachusetts Certification in May. The Department was in compliance 
with the program requirement and met the 151 standards. 

Received a total of $84,000 for Homeland Security and related emergency preparedness, 
community policing and traffic enforcement grants. 

New Horizons For Youth: 

~ September 26 n marked the beginning of the fifth year of the program and the first year 

completely under the Andover Police Department. 
~ A sizeable donation from the Andover Service Club was received and is being used to 

cover the costs of the program. 
~ There are approximately 25 volunteers from various segment of our community. 

Youth Court Grant/Program - a new program entered into with North Andover and 
Lawrence forming the Merrimack Valley Youth Court. It is a pre pre-diversion program 
targeting middle school children. 

Project Lifesaver Program - a tracking system for people who wander, such as autistic 
children and people with Alzheimer's - was initiated. Andover is the first community in the 
Merrimack Valley to participate in this national program with seven members from the 
Department trained to provide assistance. 

FIRE-RESCUE DEPARTMENT 

Changed the department's name to Andover Fire-Rescue Department. 



10 



Experienced another fire safe year with no fire-related fatalities and only a few fire-related 
injuries. 

■ Awarded over $156,000 in Federal and State Homeland Security grants for additional 
technical training and equipment that will enable the firefighters to be better trained and 
equipped to prepare for and mitigate new fire and rescue challenges that confront the 
Department. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

In September, the Town ended its fifteen-year solid waste disposal partnership with the 
twenty-three member North East Solid Waste Committee. The NEWSC organization was 
officially dissolved in December and the Town received the sum of $3,610,286.95 which was 
the balance in the various reserve accounts. 

Recycling tonnage increased in 2005 by 3.49% and solid waste tonnage decreased by 7.78%. 

Upgrades to the ozone facility at the Water Treatment Plant were completed on schedule and 
30%o under budget. Improvements included the transition to liquid oxygen- generated ozone. 
Upgrades resulted in an overall more efficient and cost-effective water treatment process. 

Chief Chemist Alan Carifio was awarded the Dexter Brackett Memorial Award by the New 
England Water Works Association for the most meritorious paper published in the 
Association's journal. 

Designed and constructed pedestrian and vehicle safety improvements on Moraine Street 
from Red Spring Road to Andover High School. 

Worked with the Town's consultant and contractor on the sewer construction project in the 
South Main Street/Ballardvale Road area. By year end, all main line sewers were installed in 
the public way. 

Survey and design work was performed for the reconstruction of sidewalks on portions of 
Chestnut Street, Whittier Street and North Main Street. 

Work was performed to implement the new EPA Phase II Stormwater Management 
regulations: coordinated the activity reports from various Town departments, storm drain 
outlets were field located and inspected in high priority sub-watershed areas such as the 
Rogers Brook, Lower Shawsheen River and Skug River watersheds; data was added to the 
GIS system to develop a Town-wide drainage map. 

■ Performed cleaning and lining of the water main on North Main Street including new fire 
hydrants, water services, and elimination of one lead lined private main. 

Replaced a portion of a sanitary sewer main on Fleming Avenue to correct continuing 
blockage problems. 



11 



Drainage improvements were made to the snow dump on High Street, major improvements 
were made to the drainage inlet and outlet at the brook that flows under High Street near 
Haverhill Street and sub-drain improvements were made to Elysian Drive. 

In the Winter of 2004 and 2005, the Highway Division battled numerous snowstorms which 
totaled 93 inches of snow. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 

Summer playground program remodeling continues. A longer day program is implemented at 
Recreation Park from 8:30 A.M. - 3:00 P.M. 

North Pole Calling - a collaborative program between DCS and the Senior Center. Five 
volunteers from the Senior Center made one hundred Santa calls to children with well wishes 
and a hearty ho-ho from the North Pole. Children were very animated and excited that Santa 
had a chance to call them. 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 

A vision research project conducted by the Center for Health and Disease Reserarch at 
Umass/Lowell included approximately 30 seniors. The project studied the effects of lutein 
and zeaxanthin in preventing age-related macular degeneration, a common cause of vision 
loss in older adults. Preliminary findings were presented to program participants who may 
continue with some dietary modification to increase their intake of those antioxidants. 

"Outdoor Adventures for Women" was initiated in an effort to offer new programming for 
younger, active "boomers". Hiking, sailing, cross-country skiing, etc. are some of the 
anticipated activities. 

TRIAD, a joint collaboration between the Senior Center, Andover Police Department, Fire- 
Rescue Department, the Essex County Sheriffs Department and the District Attorney's 
Office has been developed to address specific safety needs of Andover' s seniors and to 
provide crime prevention education materials. 

Several Andover seniors were featured in the new "A Day in the Life of the American 
Woman" book. The Senior Center hosted a presentation, book signing and reception with the 
book's author, Carol Saline, with the featured seniors as special guests. 

Despite the defeat of the proposal for a new Senior Center, the COA Board and the Senior 
Center staff continue to improve programs and services designed to enhance the lives of 
Andover' s seniors and their families. 

YOUTH SERVICES 

Continued to replace middle school sports programs that were cut from the School 
Department's budget with the following new and successful programs: 



12 



~ Track - the 3 rd annual middle school track season introduced young athletes to the 

various track and field events. 
~ Wrestling - wrestling returned to Andover in grand fashion with a turnout of over 50 

boys. The idea was generated from the kids and AYS helped bring it to reality by 

securing practice space and a mat, finding coaches and coordinating the effort. 
~ Golf - another request from kids and parents was brought to life in true AYS fashion. 

The league focused on teaching the kids the proper golf skills and etiquette that lead to 

success on the course. 

Provided a variety of service and outreach to young people and their families. Empowering 
young people to make their ideas a reality, listening to concerns and issues, college 
recommendations, referrals, non-traditional office hours, advocacy, collaboration with 
community groups and a variety of other services provides young people with the help or 
connection they need. 

TOWN CLERK 

Implemented the new Fire Safety Act changes required for the Town's twenty-two alcoholic 
beverage license holders and coordinated the changes with the Building Division and Fire 
Department to have fire code and building inspection sign offs prior to the renewal of the 
2006 licenses. 

The Town Clerk was inducted as President of the North Shore City and Town Clerk's 
Association. Active participation in the Massachusetts Town Clerk's Association as a 
member of the Executive Board and Legislative Committee. 

A new Assistant Town Clerk was hired. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 

Planning Division 

Completed major comprehensive revision of Subdivision Rules and Regulations and 
commenced public hearing for adoption by Planning Board. 

Initiated Low Impact Development strategies to promote better subdivision design and 
protection of natural features. 

Established Andover Affordable Housing Trust Fund and Board of Trustees and received 
notice of award of $62,000 in funds for affordable housing from North Shore Home 
Consortium. 

Planning Director Stephen L. Colyer announced his retirement. 

Building Division 

Single Family Residence construction activity was down approximately 33% from 2004, 
however, multi-unit residential development continues to be strong. 



13 



Conservation Division 

Hosted the Conservation Overseers' Annual Meeting and established new links with local 
land management and conservation groups and appointed Alan French as "Master Overseer" 
for the Conservation trail system. 

Permitted a Town-wide systems of trail improvements in partnership with AVIS. 

Initiated a "Conservation Intern" position for interested college students. 

Worked with the DPW and Health Division on the Fish Brook Initiative to protect the 
Town's water supply and Watershed Overlay District. 

Participated in the negotiations for the Reichhold riverfront property along the Shawsheen 
River. 

Health Division 

Reduced coliform bacteria levels in Pinnacle Brook and bird-related health nuisances in the 
Devonshire/Lennox Circle neighborhood through modification of certain agricultural 
practices. 

Worked with the Massachusetts Highway Department to obtain the designation of "Reduced 
Salt Application Zones" for Interstates 495/93 within Fish Brook/Haggetts Pond Watersheds. 

Completed Andover Board of Health Emergency Operation's Plan for biological, chemical, 
radiological and bioterrorism incidents. Published and distributed "Live. Learn. Prepare," 
information brochure to all residential facilities containing emergency preparedness 
information. 

Awarded $135,000 grant from CDC/Homeland Security Coalition dedicated to Bioterrorism 
planning and building infrastructure of local health departments. 

Public Health Director Everett Penney, Jr. announced his retirement. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Carried out activities in the second year of the Library Singular Services & Technology Act 

(LSTA)-funded "Serving People with Disabilities" grant including: 

~ The completion of new public service desks at Reference and Circulation. 

~ Design and installation of large, easy-to-read signs. 

- Installation of Kurzweil Learning Disabilities Center. 

The Circulation Department increased the number of dvds available for public use by 
collecting a $1 fee resulting in $30,000 available for new dvds and other audio-visual 
materials. They began a Wednesday night independent film series. 



14 



The Reference Department marked the fifth anniversary of 24/7 service. The reference staff 
increased its marketing efforts to businesses through its participation in the Merrimack 
Valley Chamber of Commerce Expo. 

The Children's Room carried out active programs for preschool and elementary age children 
including the implementation of a federally funded "Mother Goose Asks Why" grant that 
linked science topics with children's books. 

The Teen Room continues to be used by many middle and high school students in the 
afternoon and evening. The teens carried out several programs with the Children's Room 
including "Harry Potter Day" and held the first "Teen Poetry Contest". 

Inter-library Loan staff reorganized to handle demands imposed by the increasing number of 
inter-library reserves that have grown 700% over the last six years. 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The Department received the ADA Champion Award for exemplary effort in ensuring equal 
access for people with disabilities in the Town of Andover at the annual meeting of the 
Northeast Independent Living Program in October. 

The Town was designated as "Tree City USA" for the sixth consecutive year by the National 
Arbor Day Foundation. 

Initiated formation of the Town Energy Task force. Energy tracking system in place for all 
Town & School utility and fuel accounts. Numerous measures implemented to reduce 
energy and fuel consumption. 

New fee schedule was developed and approved for the use of all Town/School buildings and 
fields. 

Coordinated the renovation work to Andover High School Golden Warriors building at 
Lovely Field by the Friends of Andover High School Football, Inc. 

Reorganization and downsizing of the Cemetery Division was implemented. 

Over $1.5 million of capital improvement projects implemented in School and Town 
buildings and fields: security systems, West Elementary School renovations, emergency 
power/generator at the Bancroft School, new roofs, flooring & window projects, field 
irrigation & improvements, etc. 



RSS/sac 



15 




%4mi^ 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2005 



ELECTED 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Ted E. Teichert, Ch. 
Mary K. Lyman 
Alexander J. Vispoli 
John P. Hess 
Brian P. Major 



2006 
2008 
2007 
2007 
2006 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Debra R. Silberstein, Ch. - 2007 

Richard J. Collins - 2007 

Anthony H. James - 2006 

Arthur H. Barber - 2006 

David S. Samuels - 2008 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Ronald C.Hajj,Ch. -2006 

James A. Cuticchia - 2009 

Paul R. Higginbottom - 2008 

Francis A. O'Connor - 2010 

Calvin A. Deyermond* - 2006 
* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of 

Executive Office of Communities 

and Development 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. - 2008 

Michael Condon, Methuen - 2007 

Richard Hamilton, Lawrence - 2008 

John Dnscoll, North Andover - 2008 

Daniel Fleming, Lawrence - 2008 

Kenneth Hennck, Methuen - 2007 

Kenneth Hamilton, Andover - 2006 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger 
Helen A. Watkinson 
John R. Petty 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 



-2006 
-2006 
-2006 
-2006 
-2006 



TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 

Barbara Brandt-Saret - 2007 

Edward Cole - 2008 

Edward Mornssey - 2006 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



-2006 



16 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 
Stuart Jon Stumpf 
Richard T. Howe 
Margaret M. Bradshaw 
Harold J. Wright 
Timothy L. Felter 
Carl J. Byers 
Mary O'Donoghue 
Raymond E. Hender 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 
Robert A. Pustell 
Paul J. Finger 
Michael Walsh 
Marcia J. Miller 
Philip Sutherland 
Howard M. Kassler 

PLANNING BOARD 

Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 
John J. McDonnell 
Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 
Linn N. Anderson 
Sheila M. Doherty 
Selena Goldberg - Associate 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 

Candace Martin 

Dr. Stephen H. Lonng 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



2006 
2007 
2006 
2008 
2006 
2006 
2008 
2007 
2007 



2008 
2006 
2007 
2006 
2006 
2007 
2008 



2007 
2008 
2008 
2009 
2006 
2010 



2006 

2007 
2008 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DIST. COMM. 



James Sheldon, Ch. 

Diane R. Derby 

Chris Huntress 

Ron Abraham 

Bruce S. Taylor 

Sherry Kirby 

Mary Bogan 

Lynn Smiledge - Alternate 

Michael J. Ristuciia - Alternate 

YOUTH COUNCIL 

Colleen Georgian 



- 2007 

- 200S 
-2006 
-2006 
-2006 
-2008 
-2007 
-2006 
-2008 



2008 



Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2006 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2007 


Paul Bevacqua 


-2007 


Peter F. Reilly 


-2008 


Pamela H. Mitchell 


-2008 


David W. Brown - Associate 


-2008 


Nancy K. Jeton - Associate 


-2006 


Stephen D. Anderson - Associate 


-2007 


Lynne S. Batchelder - Associate 


-2006 


PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2006 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2008 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2008 


James S. Batchelder 


-2006 


Dennis Ingram 


-2007 


Raymond H. Flynn 


-2007 


Lynn Smiledge 


-2007 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2008 


Carolyn Fantmi 


-2007 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2007 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-2008 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2006 


Mana A. Rizzo 


-2006 


Mark N. Spencer 


-2006 


BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




John R. Petty, Ch. 


-2008 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2006 


Bruce Symmes 


-2007 


PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2006 


John C. Doherty 


-2006 


John J. Lewis 


-2006 


Joseph D. McCloskey 


-2006 


James M. Deyermond 


-2006 


Edward (Ted) Cole 


-2006 


Dorothy Volker 


-2006 


Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 


-2006 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2006 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 





Ann E. Constantine 



2007 



17 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

Justm J. Coppola, Ch. 
Jami Cope 
Bernadette Lionetta 
Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 
Donna Gorzela 
Madelame St. Amand 
Gilbert DeMoor 
Patricia Commane 
Julie Pike 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John R. Dempsey. Ch. 
John B. Flynn 
Barbara Worcester 
Gerald H. Silverman 
Zeff Marusich 

CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Norman Rice, Ch. 
Diane P. Hender 
Shelley Selwyn 
Alan Michel 
Stefani T. Goldshein 
Mark Spencer 
Susie Novick 
Keith Sherman 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Susan D. McKelliget, Co-Ch. 
Judith G. Trerotola, Co-Ch. 
Dorothy L. Bresnahan 
Robert J. Schreiber, M.D. 
Vicki P. Coderre 
Nancy Mulvey 
Zeff Marusich 
Patricia VanVleet 
Francis A. O'Connor 
Nancy S. Gump 
Mary Jane Bausemer 
Patricia D' Ambra Tovey 
Warren A. Rehe 

RETIREMENT BOARD 

James Cuticchia, Ch. 
Elena Kothman 
John C. Doherty 
Frank G. Castle 
Rodney P. Smith 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 



-2008 


Joan Duff, Ch. 


-2008 


-2007 


Susan Garth Stott 


-2008 


-2007 


Victoria Johnston 


-2008 


-2007 


Bruce R. Sorota 


-2006 


-2008 


Lawrence B. Morse 


-2006 


-2006 


Sarah B. Young 


-2007 


-2008 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2008 


-2008 


Christopher D. Haynes 


Emeritus 


-2007 


Lorene A. Comeau 


Emeritus 




ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 


-2008 


Barbara Brandt-Saret 


-2008 


-2007 


John T. Andreadis 


-2008 


-2006 


Kristine Arakelian 


-2008 


-2008 


David J. Reilly 


-2008 


-2006 


Archibald D. MacLaren 
RECYCLING COMMITTEE 


-2008 


-2007 


Candy Dann,, Ch. 


-2006 


-2007 


Thomas M. Adams 


-2007 


-2007 


James T. Curtis 


-2007 


-2007 


Joyce Ringleb 


-2007 


-2007 


Glenn A. Rogers, Jr. 


-2006 


-2007 


Anthony Connell 


-2007 


-2008 


Michael S. Giaimo 


-2008 


-2008 


MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 




-2008 


Clifford T. Markell, Ch. 


-2006 


-2006 


John R. Daher 


-2006 


-2008 


Judith F. Wright 


-2006 


-2007 


Abigail O'Hara 


-2006 


-2008 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2006 


-2006 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2006 


-2006 


John C. Campbell 


-2006 


-2006 


John A. Simko 


-2006 


-2007 


Karen M. Herman 


-2006 


-2007 


Gary S. Finlayson 


-2006 


-2006 


Steven J. Druth 


-2006 


-2007 






-2007 








SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


-2008 


Dr. Paul Caselle, Ch. 


-2008 


-2007 


John S. Bigelow 


-2008 


-2006 


Joyce M. Ritterhaus 


-2007 


-2009 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2006 


Open 








GR. LAWRENCE COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 


-2006 


Judith M. Yelle 


-2006 



18 



HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 



BALLARD VALE/LOWELL JUNCTION AREA 



James Cuticchia 


-2007 


TRAFFIC TASK FORCE 




Linda A. O'Connell 


-2007 


Richard Nill 


-2006 


Carolyn Hall Finlay 


-2007 


Douglas White 


-2006 


Joan Duff 


-2007 


David Gould 


-2006 


Kimberly Sousa 


-2007 


Audrey Nason 


-2006 


Reginald S. Stapczynski 


-2007 


Joseph W. Watson 


-2006 






Michael Frishman 


-2006 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




TOWLE FUND 




David J. Reilly 




Phillip F. Sullivan 


-2006 


Cynthia J. Milne 


-2006 


Donna Dyer 


-2007 


Kathleen M. Hess 


-2006 


Donald L. Thompson 


-2006 


Ruby Easton 


-2006 






Rosalie Konjoian 


-2006 


BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Leo Lafond 


-2006 


Joanne D. Dee 


-2006 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2006 


Carolyn Simko 


-2008 


David S. Drinon 


-2006 


William T. Downs 


-2007 


Norman Rice 


-2006 






LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 


Christian C. Huntress 


-2008 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2006 


Terry S. Szold 


-2008 






IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 




IND. DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 


MANGEMENT COUNCIL 




Michael W. Morns, Esq., Ch. 


-2006 


Water Tr. Plant Supt. John Pollano 


-2006 


Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 


-2007 






John E. Shuman 


-2007 


MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 


KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 




Planning Director Stephen L. Colyer 


-2006 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2006 


GR. LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 


DPW Director John A. Petkus, Jr. 


-2007 


Planning Director Stephen L. Colyer 


-2006 


NORTHEAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 


VETERANS SERVICE AGENT 




DPW Director John A. Petkus, Jr. 


-2006 


John Doherty 


-2006 


MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 









Jeremiah J. O' Sullivan, Esq. 



2008 



19 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Acting Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Healing and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distnbulion 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Youth Services Director 



Everett F. Penney, Jr. 

Stephen L. Colyer 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John C. Doherty 

Charles H. Mumane, Jr. 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Kenneth H. Parker 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morns B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

William D. Fahey 



20 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 



Mailing Address: Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 



Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 
Fire Department - Business 
Police Department - Business 
Animal Control Officer 
DCS Classes & Activities 
Department of Public Works 
Human Resources Office 
Memorial Hall Library 
Senior Center 
Superintendent of Schools 



8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



911 

978-623-8466 

978-475-0411 

978-475-0411 ext. 1103 

978-623-8273/8274 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8530 

978-623-8400 

978-623-8321 

978-623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 
Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 30,820 



Square Miles: 32 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,826 controlled by Conservation Commission 

1,200 owned by A. V.I. S. 

889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Annual 
Town Meeting is generally held four weeks following the 
Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information: Town Clerk's Office 978-623-8255 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



When are Taxes Due: 



$1 1.40 - Residential and Open Space 

$17.95 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 



21 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



Recycling Information: 



Questions: Call Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 

Curbside Pickup: Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Recyclable material inclusive of glass (all colors), steel & tin cans, 
aluminum containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable paper 
products include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office paper, 
paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and corrugated 
containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and fold boxes, 
cartons & other pieces of cardboard into V x 2' x 1' bundles - then 
tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 

Complaints/Information: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. 
Clippings must be removed from container used to transport for 
dumping. All contaminated loads will be rejected. Fines will be 
assessed for illegal dumping. Open year round for walk-ins. Drive- 
ins announced in local newspapers and on Town's website. 



Rubbish Information: 

Curbside Pickup: Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 

Complaints or Inquiries: Call Allied Waste/BFI at 1 -800-442-9006 

Construction & Demolition Debris: Banned from the waste stream. Debris 

includes but is not limited to doors, windows, 
sheet rock, fences, asphalt, brick, concrete and 
pressure-treated wood. 

How to Dispose of an Appliance: Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 

their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 

Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



Pothole Claims: 



Submit a letter within thirty days of the date of the incident to the Town 
Manager's Office or contact John Doherty at 978-623-8218 with any 
questions. 



22 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 

Ballfield Permits & Rentals Facilities Coordinator 



Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning By-law Variance 



Town Clerk's Office 



978-623-8450 



978-623-8255 



Building Division 978-623-8301 

(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Town Clerk's Office 



Town Clerk's Office 



Town Clerk's Office 



Facilities Coordinator 



Town Clerk's Office 



Health Division 



Town Clerk's Office 



Town Clerk's Office 



Town Clerk's Office 



Fire Department 



Town Clerk's Office 



Fire Department 



Facilities Coordinator 



Building Division 



978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

and/or 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 



Dept. of Public Works 978-623-8350 

Town Manager's Office 978-623-8225 



978-623-6450 



978-623-8301 
and/or 
Board of Appeals Office 978-623-8315 



23 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

senatorfa-.kennedv.senate.gov 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 

617-565-8519 

362 Russell Senate Office Building. Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-2742 

johnkenVa, kerrv.senate.com 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 1 852 

978-459-0101 

2447 Rayburn House Office Building. Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

martin.mechana mail-house. uo\ 

State Senator: 



Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston. MA 02 1 33 

617-722-1612 

stuckera senate. staie.ma.us 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 473B, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-2676 

rep.barryfmegold((thou. state, ma.us 

Barbara A. LTtalien (D) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1 , 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 26, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-2080 

rep.barbararitalienfohou.state.ma.us 

24 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 19, 2005 

FOUNDERS ' DAY WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 
THE DATE OF THE TOWN'S INCORPORATION ON MAY 6, 1646. 

HONORING TOWN AND SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 
WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



35 Years of Service: 

Philip E. Froburg, Police Department 

30 Years of Service: 

Kevin J. Burke, Police Department 
William J. Connors, Plant & Facilities 

25 Years of Service: 

Lincoln O. Clark, Fire Department 
James A. Cuticchia, Fire Department 
Ronald E. Hancock, Public Works 

20 Years of Service: 

Lee J. Britton, Police Department 
Stephen L. Colyer, CD&P, Planning 
Deborah L. Fay, Public Works 
Richard P. Ford, Public Works 
James E. Haggerty, Police Department 
David J. Hajj, Public Works 
Edward S. Mazzaglia, Plant & Facilities 
Wayne R. Merola, Fire Department 

15 Years of Service: 

Edwin S. Ataide, Plant & Facilities 
Meredith J. Barlow, Town Clerk 
James R. Greenwood, Public Works 
Candace Hall-Nourse, Human Resources 

10 Years of Service: 

Brian C. Davies, Fire Department 
Susan L. Doolin, Information Systems 
Garrett E. Ferris, Fire Department 
John D. Gangi, Fire Department 
John W. Hines, Fire Department 



Thomas F. Siopes, Police Department 
Daniel H. Tremblay, CD&P, Health Division 



Brian W. Moore, DPW, Engineering Division 
Helen M. Sellers, Library 
Elaine M. Shola, Purchasing 



Kevin P. Moore, Fire Department 
Wayne D. Nader, Police Department 
Todd R. Pomerleau, Fire Department 
Marie C. Robertson, Library 
John S. Ronan, Fire Department 
Scott A. Silva, Public Works 
William J. Wallace, Police Department 
Delores J. Zimmer, Collector/Treasurer 



William H. Miner, Plant & Facilities 
Michael P. Murnane, Public Works 
Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 
Mary Ann T. Whittingham, CD&P 



Barbara McNamara, Library 
Robert G. Pelletier, Fire Department 
Ruth Rosensweig, Library 
Mary R. Stearns, Collector/Treasurer 
Glenn E. Wilson, Youth Services 



25 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



35 Years of Service: 



Ethel T. Coltin, West Elementary 
Jean C. Finn, Doherty Middle 
Arthur W. Iworsky, West Elementary 
Stephen C. Jankauskas, Sanborn 



30 Years of Service: 



Darlene A. Antonucci, Andover High 
Albert W. Cayot, Andover High 
Paula J. Eichner, Wood High Middle 



25 Years of Service: 



Virginia M. Champagne, Sanborn 
Susan A. Infantine, Shawsheen 
William A. Kolbe, Andover High 



20 Years of Service: 



David A. Bettencourt, Doherty Middle 
June L. Blake, Sanbom 
Ann M. Davies, Food Service 
Diane L. Davison, Crossing Guard 
Nancy P. Ghirardini, Shawsheen 
John G. Heidenrich, West Middle 
Bette J. Kidwell, Sanborn 
Janet L. Lewis, Andover High 
Antoinette E. Lord, Bancroft Elementary 
Elizabeth L. Macumber, Andover High 



15 Years of Service: 



Maureen G. Pellerin, High Plain Elementary 
Eileen M. Shannon, Andover High 
David J. Silva, Doherty Middle 
Sharon M. Wilson, Andover High 



Kathleen M. St. Amand, West Elementary 
Patricia A. Thomson, West Elementary 
Kathleen A. Zalla, Andover High 



Jeanne D. Normandy, West Elementary 
George J. Spanos, Andover High 



Cheryl A. McGuire, High Plain Elementary 
Barbara E. Noga, Bancroft Elementary 
Elizabeth M. Roos, West Elementary 
Valerie J. Rurack, South 
Dianne A. Sherry, Food Service 
Ronald D. Smith, West Middle 
Regina Stein High Plain Elementary 
Anna M. Sullivan, Andover High 
Nancy M. Sweeney, Bancroft Elementary 



Martha S. Bancroft, Shawsheen 

Sara H. Bean, Bancroft Elementary 

James F. Costello, Andover High 

Kristina A. Dewey, Technology 

Candace A. Hall-Nourse, Human Resources 

Nina Jones, Shawsheen 

Susan E. Monteiro, West Elementary 

Noreen T. Murphy, West Middle 

William M. Napolitano, Substitute Teacher 



Joan M. Nimerowski, West Middle 
Anthony R. Russo, Athletics 
Maria C. Salvia, Andover High 
Allen D. Smith, Bancroft Elementary 
Sharyn A. Taitz, West Middle 
Lynne M. Vaughan, Bancroft Elementary 
Paul L. Willis, Andover High 
Rosemarie Webb, Sanborn 



10 Years of Service: 



Nicole M. Brezinski, High Plain Elementary Ann M. McNamee, Doherty Middle 
Ricardo L. Chanquet, West Elementary Traci R. McNulty, Shawsheen 

Melinda G. Crossman, System-wide Donna M. Mohan, High Plain Elementary 

Nancy R. Daigle, West Elementary Ann B. O'Donnell, Shawsheen 



26 



10 Years of Service (Cont): 

Dorothy D. Delorenzo, Asst. Superintendent 

Renee R. Drueke, Andover High 

Robin L. Dubois, High Plain Elementary 

David Fazio, Andover High 

Wm. G. Fleischmann, Wood Hill Middle 

Lisa A. Freeman, High Plain Elementary 

Susan R. Frish, Substitute Teacher 

David W. Froburg, South 

Patricia Gregory, Wood Hill Middle 

Joan Gujarati, West Elementary 

Mary Ellen Johnson, Sanborn 

Joyce M. Larsen McLary, Shawsheen 

Maria A. Maffeo, Sanborn 

Norah M. McCarthy, Wood Hill Middle 

Deborah A. McLaughlin, South 



Cynthia T. Olendzenski, High Plain 

Pauline Perry, Bancroft Elementary 

Diane M. Pfeiffer, South 

Debra A. Powers, Andover High 

Susan M. Powers, High Plain Elementary 

Alberta A. Sensale, Shawsheen 

Nancy Shaheen, South 

Olga Shaknovsky, Andover High 

Betty A. Singleton, Wood Hill Middle 

Lisa A. Spampinato, West Elementary 

Patricia M. Tivnan, Doherty Middle 

Maureen A. Wholey, Andover High 

Daphne J. Winders, Shawsheen 

Diane L. Winkelman, High Plain Elementary 

Janet L. Wright, Business Office 



TOWN RETIREMENTS: 

Deanna B. Atchison, Library 
Patricia C. Bellino, Library 
Edward M. Connor, Fire Department 
Constance A. Murphy, Plant & Facilities 
George E. Douty, Jr., Plant & Facilities 
Constance A. Grant, Collector/Treasurer 



James A. Greer, CD&P, Conservation Division 

Norman E. Leahy, DPW, Water Department 

James R. Lynch, Fire Department 

Jeanne Madden, Elder Services 

Arden M. Reynolds, Library 

Jeffrey P. Watson, DPW, Highway Division 



SCHOOL RETIREMENTS: 

Phyllis A. Andrews, Wood Hill Middle 

Nancy Amdt, West Middle 

Douglas L. Buchanan, Wood Hill Middle 

Kathleen D. Cook, Andover High 

John W. Damn, Jr., Andover High 

Donna M. Doerr, West Elementary 

Claire E. Gauthier, South 

John F. Gleason, West Elementary 

Kathleen M. Hammond, West Middle 

Marcia T. Harol, Andover High 

Elizabeth M. Jankauskas, West Elementary 

Ann M. Kelly, West Elementary 

Kenneth J. Laurenti, Shawsheen 

Linda Lounsbury, West Elementary 



Charlotte J. Lynch, West Elementary 
Cecile L. Martin, Technology 
Barbara G. Neal, West Middle 
Julia K. Parkhurst, Pupil Personnel 
Jean E. Pendergrass, South 
Francis J. Rapisardi, South 
Louise M. Rozzi, South 
Mary Sheehan, Wood Hill Middle 
Myrna F. Silverman, South 
Arlette L. Tanin, South 
Bernard Tuttle, Business Office 
Richard F. Valle, Bancroft Elementary 
Cynthia White, Bancroft Elementary 



27 



FINANCF A. RimCFT DFPARTMFNT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCF ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2005 Budget was released on February 4, 
2005. During the months of February, March, and April meetings were held with the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 11,300 households. The 
Annual Town Meeting began on Monday, April 26, 2005 and the Fiscal Year 2006 operating 
budget (Article 4 and Article 5) was adopted in the amount of $1 16,31 1,208. This budget was an 
increase of 4.7% from the Fiscal Year 2005 operating budget of $1 1 1,067,544. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2005 follow: 

• Provided staff support to the Budget Planning group. 

• Prepared Town Manager's Recommended FY2006 Budget 

• Prepared the Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY2007 - FY201 1 . 

• Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

• Produced 2005 Finance Committee Report 

• Provided staff support to the Andover Cable Advisory Committee in license renewal 
discussions with Comcast and new license request from Verizon. 

• Worked with staff, financial advisor and Moody's Investors Service to maintain Andover's Aaa 
bond rating. 



CFNTRAI PURCHASING 

In 2005 the Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,725 purchase orders and 
2,379 requests for payment for the Town, and 3.709 purchase orders for the School Department. 
During this period there were approximately 42 bids, 7 requests for proposals and 3 Request for 
Written Responses that were advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the 
State bid contracts available to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers 
of Andover. 

Throughout 2005 Andover has initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as 
well as participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts 
General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through 
the bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, 

28 



road salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, office supplies, equipment and 
furniture, and school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 2005 were: 

Re-Bid Sewerage Works Improvements Holt Road Area, Contract No. 4 

Collins Center HVAC Units Replacement 

One (1) New 2005 or Current Model Year Cab & Chassis 4x2 with Platform/Stake Body & 

Power Tailgate 

Emergency Generator & Power Distribution Upgrade at Bancroft School 

New Locks at the West Elementary School 

Scholar Supplies 

Asbestos Abatement at the West Elementary School 

Prime Grocer for School Lunches and Senior Center 

Toilet Renovations at Bancroft School Phase II 

Custodian Supplies 

Miscellaneous Road Materials & Concrete Pipe (Annual Requirements) 

Athletic Supplies 

Re-Roofing of Selected Areas at the Bancroft School 

Four (4) New 2006 or Current Model Year 4 Door 4x4 Sport Utility Vehicles 

Re-Roofing of Selected Areas at the West Elementary School 

Laptop Batteries for Andover Public Schools 

Physical Education Supplies & Equipment 

One (1) New 2006 Heavy Duty Chassis with Dump Body minimum of- 42,940 GVW 

Polyester Fiber Reinforced Crackfill (Annual Requirements) 

Cooperative Bid for Office Supplies, Toner Cartridges, Equipment and Furniture - School 

and Municipal Government 

Cooperative Bid for Highway Road Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Water Main Cleaning & lining 

Moraine Street Improvements 

Water Purification Facilities Filter Addition (this included seven filed sub-bids) 

Roof Replacement at The Andover Maintenance Shop 

Four (4) New 2006 Marked Law Enforcements Sedans and One (1) New 2006 

Administrative Sedan 

Comprehensive Planning Analysis for 100 Lovejoy Road 

Environmental Consulting Peer Review & Support Services for Reichhold Chemicals Inc. 

Site 

Consulting and Bid Evaluation for Town Property and Casualty Insurance 

Billing Service for Emergency Ambulance Service for the Andover Fire Department 

Professional Engineering Services for Fish Brook Intake Modification 

Environmental Consulting Services for Salt Mass Balance Study 

French Drain for West Middle School Gym Crawlspace 

New Intercom System at the Doherty Middle School 

West Elementary School - Crawlspace Steam Pipe Insulation Project 



29 



The Purchasing Division is also responsible for administering the contract compliance of 
Andover's Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty insurance 
and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Human Resources Department, 
however, handles the Health and Personal insurance for both Town and School Departments. 
The Purchasing Department is also responsible for overseeing our current insurance company's 
Rewards Program that helps control and reduce losses along with providing future savings on 
insurance premiums. The Town of Andover recently received a plaque from our insurance 
company, Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), recognizing the Town for its 
High Achievement under their Rewards Program. Participation in the MELA Rewards Program 
earned the Town a $29,827.00 credit reducing this past year's insurance premium by that amount. 
The Purchasing Department also processed approximately 41 casualty and property claims over 
the year and was able to recover $74,810.26 for the Town. 



TO! IFrTOR/TRFASIfRFR 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Highlights during 2005 are as follows: 

• Reduced Tax Title accounts to a record low at 470, 1 08 

• Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills, 32,000 excise tax 
bills and payments and 25,000 water/sewer bills 

. Borrowed 12,000,000 BANs for Town and School projects at 2.718% for 20 years at 3.875% 

• Replaced the retiring Assistant Treasurer after 32 years of service 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization. The Andover chapter was 
formed in 1997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1997 Annual Town Meeting. During the 
year, several fundraising events were held and donations were received from many Andover 
residents that resulted in the awarding of thirty-seven scholarships in the amount of $41,550 to 
deserving Andover students pursuing further education. 

Balance: January 1, 2005 

Income, Donations, Gifts 
Expenses, Scholarships 

Balance: December 31, 2005 $559,516 $556,815 



ASSFSSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing all real estate and personal property 
accounts and motor vehicle excise taxes in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of these 
taxes. The three-member board is also responsible for the awarding nearly 250 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled 
veterans, widows and widowers and individuals classified as blind. 



30 



$560,911 


$559,516 


31,429 


40,293 


32,824 


42,994 



The Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three years) 
basis. We completed a revaluation for Fiscal Year 2006. The next required revaluation will be 
conducted for Fiscal Year 2009 but if needed interim adjustments will be made for Fiscal Year 
2007. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue guidelines 
for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amount of property and ownership related information 
that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on all property 
and the valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on the Town's 
web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received and 
processed on an annual basis. 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 
the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations. 

Highlights during the year include the following: 

Automated the Water/Sewer special bill process to increase efficiency and streamline 

processing. 

Continued to upgrade/replace the desktop hardware as part of an ongoing 

maintenance/replacement plan. 

Substantially increased content on employee intranet to expand internal communication 

and access to information, especially for employees on other town networks. 

Improved reporting and tracking of the multi -phased Sewer Betterment project. 

Encouraged employees to conserve technology-related energy use via power management 

utilities and other energy-savings measures. 



31 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



MOTOR VEHICLE BILLS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



PURCHASE ORDERS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



$1,400,000 



$1,200,000 
$1,000,000 - 
$800,000 

$600,000 -I 

I 
$400,000 

$200,000 



tS> 



oo 



\~ ; 



^ # ^ ^ ^ 



cb 



TOWN WEBSITE VISITS 
(Mthly. Avg.) 



20,000 

18,000 

16,000 

14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 | 

4,000 

2,000 





17909 






Vi 2810 


Vmnnn 




^r^390 


jr-Mnn 



^533 



fooo 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



32 



BUDGET SUMMARY AND TAX RATE INFORMATION 

EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgements 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Other Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

% increase 



FINAL 
FY2004 


FINAL 
FY2005 


FINAL 
FY2006 


109,611,569 


112,443,621 


117,270,644 


5,000 



15,125 



55.531 

75,656 


3,200 



79,008 



58.411 

140,619 


4,000 



206,268 



62.165 

272,433 


1,399,844 

703.742 

$111,790,811 

1.1% 


1,609,041 

700.105 

$114,893,386 

2.8% 


1,986,283 

854.114 

$120,383,474 

4.8% 



REVENUES and OTHER FUNDING SOURCES 

Revenue from State 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 
Total from State 



9,198,703 



9,198,703 



9,235,760 



9,235,760 



9,799,758 



9,799,758 



Revenue from Town 

General Local Revenue 

Revenue for Specific Purposes-Offset Receipts 

Water and Sewer Revenue 

Total Local Receipts 



8,254,000 

1,619,000 

10.458.979 

20,331,979 



8,300,000 

1,728,820 

12.273.876 

22,302,696 



8,865,661 

2,021,252 

11.762.430 

22,649,343 



Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 
Free Cash used for Warrant Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Total Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 



1,649,775 

240.707 

1,890,482 



306,000 
373.472 
679,472 



662,377 

386.993 

1,049,370 



Free Cash used for Operating Budget 



1,205,307 



1,007,648 



876,000 



Total Non-Property Tax Revenues and Other Funding 32,626,471 33,225,576 34,374,471 
Total Property Taxes 79.164.340 81.667.810 86.009.003 

TOTAL REVENUES 111,790,811 114,893,386 1 20,383,474 



VALUATIONS AND 
TAX RATES 



TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 



FINAL 
FY2004 

$6,113,568 
11.47 
18.13 
12.95 



FINAL 
FY2005 

$6,350,543 
11.51 
18.00 
12.86 



FINAL 
FY2006 

$6,805,544 
11.40 
17.95 
12.64 



WHERE REVENUES 
COME FROM 



STATE AID 
LOCAL REVENUE 
OTHER FUNDS 
FREE CASH 
PROPERTY TAXES 



FINAL 


FINAL 


FINAL 


FY2004 


FY2005 


FY2006 


8.23% 


8.04% 


8.14% 


18.19% 


19.41% 


18.81% 


0.22% 


0.33% 


0.32% 


2.55% 


1.14% 


1 .28% 


70.81% 


71.08% 


71.45% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



33 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
FISCAL YEAR 2006 

ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 



PROPERTY 


FY 2003 


FY 2003 


FY 2004 


FY 2004 


FY 2005 


FY 2005 


FY 2006 


FY 2006 


TYPE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


# ACCTS 


VALUE 


# ACCTS 


I VALUE 


SNGL FAM 


8,310 


$3,905,684,600 


8,333 


$4,148,015,700 


8,366 


$4,367,402,300 


8,437 


$4,736,207,600 


CONDO 


978 


$ 189,684,800 


1,004 


$ 289,306,800 


1,074 


$ 244,011,100 


1,455 


$ 355,443,200 


MULTI FAM 


371 


$ 194,507,300 


361 


$ 209,075,200 


351 


$ 219,473,300 


341 


$ 209,337,800 


VAC LAND 


564 


$ 64,260,600 


560 


$ 62,109,700 


644 


$ 68,193,844 


596 


$ 74,208,300 


OTHER RESID 


105 


$ 21,577,200 


98 


$ 22,986,400 


32 


$ 22,420,100 


30 


$ 21,980,100 


COMM 


257 


$ 616,845,104 


253 


$ 563,105,001 


263 


$ 552,956,251 


248 


$ 527,511,100 


INDUST 


141 


$ 571,121,500 


137 


$ 548,998,100 


136 


$ 530,135,900 


137 


$ 536,570,500 


MIXED USE 


182 


$ 239,410,600 


190 


$ 242,375,700 


186 


$ 236,626,400 


185 


$ 244,588,700 


PERS PROP 


378 


$ 110,559,980 


381 


$ 107,565,301 


406 


$ 109,324,908 


395 


$ 94,200,625 


TOTALS 


11,296 


$5,913,651,684 


11,317 


$6,113,567,902 


11,458 


$6,350,543,459 


11,837 


$6,805,544,272 



ANNUAL MOTOR VEHICLE EXCtt OTALS 

# COMMITMENTS 

# BILLS 

TOTAL EXCISE TAX 

(ALL FIGURES ARE AS OF 3/1/05) 

ANNUAL EXEMPTION TOTALS 



2006 


2005 


2004 


2003 


1 


7 


7 


11 


24,651 


31,623 


31,508 


32,089 


$3,246,269 


$4,749,556 


$4,701,658 


$4,636,004 



EXEMPT 


FISCAL 2005 FISCAL 2005 FISCAL 


TYPE 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT NUMB: 


WIDOWS 


17 


$ 5,675 25 


VETERANS 


139 


$ 85,157 149 


BLIND 


24 


$ 20,472 24 


SENIORS 


46 


$ 58,154 49 


DEFERRALS 


8 


$ 23,900 8 


HARDSHIPS 


1 


$ 1,000 1 



TOTALS 235 

ANNUAL ABATEMENTS 



$ 194,537 



TYPE 



FISCAL 2004 
NUMBER 



RESIDENTIAL 51 

SENIOR VOUCH 129 

COMM/IND 35 
PERS PROPERTY 

TOTALS 215 



256 



FISCAL 2004 
TAX AMOUNT 

$ 58,448 
$ 76,290 
$784,984 



$919,722 



$ 8,575 
$ 88,127 
$ 19,678 
$ 49,000 
$ 20,434 
$ 1,000 

$186,814 



54 

159 

20 

27 
4 

1 

266 



FISCAL 2005 
NUMBER 

38 

143 

12 

8 

201 



$ 17,325 
$ 93,114 
$ 18,165 
$ 25,827 
$ 7,298 
$ 1,000 

$162,728 



FISCAL 2005 
TAX AMOUNT 

$ 38,218 
$ 85,356 
$ 347,548 
$ 121,667 



49 


$ 16,425 


157 


$ 89,552 


21 


$ 18,655 


35 


$ 32,871 


4 


$ 10,376 


1 


$ 1,500 



268 



$169,379 



$585,789 



34 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2005, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles and attended all Town 
Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. Many 
easements were drafted for the on-going expansion of the Town's sewer system. 

An Intermunicipal Sewer Agreement with Tewksbury for the Professional Center for 
Handicapped Children was drafted and then signed by the towns. Several requests for public 
records were reviewed and discussed with the Office of the Commonwealth's Supervisor of 
Public Records. Town Counsel assisted the Planning Board in its effort to make substantial 
modifications to its Subdivision Rules and Regulations. A trust for affordable housing funds was 
drafted and approved by Town Meeting. Town Counsel drafted Special Legislation which was 
enacted to permit sewer line construction to be done in the Wood Memorial Park. Various deed 
restrictions and regulatory agreements were reviewed for affordable housing and comprehensive 
permit projects. 



35 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the community 
and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



The following accomplishments were achieved by the Town Clerk's Office in 2005: 

Managed a Town Election, the Annual Town Meeting and a Special Town Meeting. 

With the assistance of two resident volunteers, began an electronic record inventory of 
the Town's historic records which are stored in the Town Offices vault. 

Instituted a new licensing program for all Town licenses issued from the Clerk's Office 
with technical assistance from Information Services. The new program required 
considerable detail data conversion and now provides the Town with better reporting and 
more flexibility in maintaining up-to-date records. 

The new Fire Safety Act required changes in the inspection of the Town's twenty-two 
Alcoholic Beverage pouring licenses. The Office partnered with the Inspector of 
Buildings and the Fire Department to conduct fire code and building inspection approvals 
prior to the renewal of the 2006 licenses. The new procedure will then be done on a 
yearly basis prior to renewal approval by the Board of Selectmen. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

Town Census 

In January 2005, the Town Census was mailed to 1 1 ,8 1 5 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the census was 30,820. 

Election/Voter Registration 

The year ended with 19,380 registered voters in nine precincts as follows: 
Precinct 1-2,106 Precinct 2 - 2,080 Precinct 3-2,192 Precinct 4 - 1,925 
Precinct 5 -2,148 Precinct 6 -2,173 Precinct 7 - 2,212 Precinct 8 - 2,353 
Precinct 9 -2,187 



Election 



Date 



No. Voted 



% of Voters 



Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 

Special Town Meeting 



March 22, 2005 484 

April 24, 25 & 707* 

May 2, 2005 . * first night 

September 27, 2005 1,129 



2% 
3% 

6% 



36 



Recordings 



Births Recorded 

Marriages Recorded 

Deaths Recorded 

Dog Licenses Sold 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 

Business Certificates 

New Voter Registrations 

Passport Applications 



2003 



2004 



2005 



285 


302 


272 


106 


169 


133 


245 


252 


260 


2292 


2272 


2230 


375 


296 


265 


167 


177 


123 


1044 


2611 


931 


1163 


1200 


797 



Fees Collected 



Marriage Licenses 

Certified Copies 

Uniform Commercial Code Filings* 

Miscellaneous Licenses Income 

Liquor Licenses Income 

Business Certificate Filings 

Miscellaneous Income 

Passport Fees 

Dog Licenses 

Non Criminal Violations 

Copy of Public Records 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 



2003 



2004 



2005 



2,690.00 


4,300.00 


3,400.00 


13,338.00 


17,897.00 


16,538.00 


4,645.05 


2,506.04 


1,946.73* 


13,960.00 


12,390.00 


13,560.00 


01,340.00 


95,470.00 


94,700.00 


5,010.00 


5,410.00 


3,740.00 


3,589.20 


4,490.71 


4,342.95 


34,890.00 


36,000.00 


23,910.00 


25,055.00 


20,822.00 


22,210.00 


1,910.00 


3,675.00 


4250.00 


283.40 


282.35 


309.30 


8,539.65** 


7,767.10*** 


7,391.50**** 



TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED 



$189,597.75 $215,250.30 $211,010.20 



** 



As of July 1, 2001, all U.C.C. Filings are filed and processed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Cities and towns will receive a decreasing percentage of funds from the 
Secretary of State for a period of five years. 

$8,397.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $141 .90 were 
retained by the Town. 



*** $7,638.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $128.35 were 
retained by the Town. 

**** 7,265.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $126.25 were 
retained by the Town. 



37 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



FEE REVENUES 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



200 

190 

180 

170 

160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 



177 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



f \ 


DOG LICENSES 


2,400 






2,350 
2,300 
2,250 


♦ 2,321 2,292 


2,200 


/ 2,238 2,230 


2,150 


I 2,147 


2,100 


/ 


2,050 


♦ 2,041 


2,000 






1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 


L -J 



3,500 

3,250 

3,000 

2,750 

2,500 

2,250 

2,000 

1,750 

1,500 

1,250 

1,000 

750 

500 

250 





VITAL RECORDS & PASSPORTS 



m 



CO 

o 



Ln 
O 



rsi 









1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



38 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public safety 
and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods are 
maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes integrity, 
honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment that values 
differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department encourages citizen 
input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between the community and 
the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone 
within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 32,209 incidents in 2005 - a slight increase over 2004. There were 
539 arrests, 458 larcenies and 69 burglaries. 

The Town experienced an increase in all categories of reported crimes except stolen bicycles 
and vandalism. 

The Department issued 5,484 motor vehicle citations during the year which is 
approximately the same as 2004. There were 1,007 motor vehicle accidents handled by the 
Department - a 7% decrease from the previous year. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, agencies and 
the community throughout the year. The Sub-Stations, located in Brookside Estates and on 
Grandview Terrace, continued to allow the Department to form a partnership with the residents of 
Brookside Estates, the Andover Housing Authority and the Youth Services Department through the 
New Horizons for Youth Grant Program. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and Memorial 
Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the Feaster Five Road 
Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held throughout the year. 

RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This service 



39 



enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as well as to the entire 
community. 

The Police Department received more than $91,235 in new grant money during 2005. These 
grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel and other 
resources. Equipment grants allowed the Department to provide car safety seats and bicycle helmets 
to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such safety items. Emergency equipment such as 
tent shelters, body armor, gas masks, pumps and generators, protective screening, defibrillators and 
other emergency communication equipment were also purchased with this grant money. Highway 
Safety grants allowed for extra patrols and enforcement around high accident locations. The New 
Horizon for Youth Grant allowed the Department to continue working with at-risk youths. This was 
the last year for this grant. 

The Court Section processed a total of 539 arrests. This included tracking all Police 
Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' appearances in court. In 
addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other Town Departments such as the 
Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up of investigations conducted by the 
agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was created in 
response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active role in 
combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. In addition, two officers were trained in technical 
services such as fingerprint identification techniques and crime scene processing and four officers 
were trained in rape investigation. The Division also has one investigator assigned as a Juvenile 
Officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators of 
numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 69 burglaries, 6 rapes and 458 larcenies. 
The Police Department experienced a large increase in the number of all reported crime categories 
this year with the exception of vandalism and stolen bicycles. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. They recognize this new aspect of 
Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of the 
Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 669 calls for service in 2005. He responded to 263 dog 
complaints and impounded 75 dogs and 3 cats. He also removed 157 deceased animals. In addition 
to these removed animals, there were 60 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in Town. 



40 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA), the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI"s Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the regional Local Emergency Planning 
Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any hazardous 
materials incident. 

The Chief of Police also sits on the Commonwealth's Northeast Homeland Security Regional 
Advisory Council. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They are a 
very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a resource. 



41 



POLICE STATISTICS 



ARRESTS 



900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



53 



38 



56 



38 

□ 37 31 



n p 22 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



D Adult 



□ Juvenile 



ASSAULTS 



A 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



BREAKING & ENTERING 



100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 4 
40 
30 



95 



83 




69 



48 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



42 



POLICE STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




♦ 69 


\ 


V^4 


-.22 


■^34 ^^<L 

19 ..*& \ 18^*22 


"19- 


-"--.-17 \ *- 

to -itv 14- . « 


- iu - ■ ■ y 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



Motor Vehicles 



- ♦ - - Bicycles 



DOMESTIC ABUSE 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 



13749 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



<w 



360 i 

340 

320 

300 

280 

260 

240 

220 

200 

180 

160 

140 

120 

100 



737 



VANDALISM 



301 



192 1R8 



736 



n ~2T6— 214" 



485 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



<*. 



43 



FIRE-RESCUE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to protect the lives and property of the 
citizens of Andover as well as the people who work in and visit our Community. 



To achieve its mission, the Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or fire 
related activities through inspections, training, and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



2003 



2004 



2005 



TOTAL INCIDENTS: 



10,932 



9,651 



10,052 



Fires 

EMS Calls 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Hazardous Conditions 

False Alarms & False Calls 

Miscellaneous Alarms 

Good Intent Calls 

Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 

Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 

Fire Prevention Activities 

Service Calls 

Training 

Co-Activation 



1,098 


1,028 


1,279 


3,094 


2,514 


2,632 


284 


253 


265 


130 


109 


227 


747 


744 


814 


529 


303 


192 


140 


117 


141 


17 


21 


21 


57 


50 


48 


2,204 


2,135 


1,730 


2,460 


2,231 


2,421 


138 


121 


225 


34 


25 


57 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED: 



2,138 



2,047 



2,158 



Smoke Detectors 
Report Copies 
Blasting Permits 
Cutting/Welding Permits 
Dumpster Permits 
Fireworks Display Permits 
Gunpowder Storage Permits 
Liquid Gas Storage Permits 
Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 
Miscellaneous Permits 
Open Air Burning Permits 
Oil Burner Install Permits 
Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 
Special Suppression System Permits 



814 


840 


1,038 


66 


82 


57 


51 


68 


44 


22 


24 


24 


127 


143 


104 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 





86 


53 


95 


6 


2 


9 


4 


2 


10 


513 


487 


437 


108 


138 


110 


63 


78 


80 


7 


2 


9 



44 



2003 



2004 



2005 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (Cont.) 

Sprinkler Install Permits 
Underground Tank Re-certification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



64 


52 


69 


9 


11 


10 


45 


53 


41 











150 


8* 


20 



FEES COLLECTED: 



Ambulance Fees (FY) 
Permits/Licenses: 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



$636,469 
$ 39,860 
$ 30,035 



$719,437 
$ 42,035 
$ 16,000* 



$753,300 
$ 45,590 
$ 4,000 



* Department is phasing out the maintenance of fire alarm monitoring system. 
PERSONNEL: 74 72.5 



72 



FACILITIES : 

Fire Administration 

Public Safety Center, 32 North Main Street 

Fire Prevention Office 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street 

Central Station 

Public Safety Center, 32 North Main Street 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT 



1 Command Vehicle 



1 Sedan 



2 Ambulances (1 in reserve) 
2 Ladder Trucks 
2 Pumpers (1 in reserve) 
2 Boats 

1 Brush Truck 

2 Sedans 

1 Special Services Truck 

1 Ambulance 

1 Pumper 

1 Fire Alarm Truck 

1 Brush Truck 

2 Boats 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 Pumper 

2 Boats 



45 



FIRE STATISTICS 



800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



FIRE CALLS 









CI 

rsi 

ON 

10 










<T 


o 


«-i 




m — 


LT1 




u-i 






=3 

en 
m 
Ln 








in 
T 




=3 

O 
rsi 


- 




o> 






=3 

in 

T 







1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 
□ Andover □ Mutual Aid 



3,000 
2,800 
2,600 
2,400 
2,200 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
1,400 
1,200 
1,000 



AMBULANCE TRANSPORTS 



iO m 



- 



rsi 
in 



o 

in 



oo 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 
D ANDOVER □ MUTUAL 



PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 



1,600 

1,400 

1,200 

1,000 

800 

600 

400 

200 






1^ 



O 

00 



o 
o 



m 



o 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



□ SMOKE 



DOPEN 



□ DUMP 



500 
450 
400 
350 
300 
250 
200 
150 
100 ' 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




258 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



46 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 



BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town 's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, BallardVale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) 
submitted with applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board and other Commission/Committee meetings. 



DIVISION STATISTICS 

2003 2004 2005 

New Dwellings 44 74 46 

Additions/Alternations to Single Family 

Dwellings 
New Multi-family Dwellings 
Additions/Alterations to Multi-Family Dwellings 
New Commercial & Industrial Buildings 
Additions/ Alternations to Commercial & 

Industrial Buildings 
Schools/Public Buildings 
Swimming Pools 
Signs, Chimneys, Woodbuming Stoves & 

Raze Permits 
Certificates of Inspection 
Fees Collected 
Total Estimated Value 



875 


905 


880 


10 


15 


6 


gs 14 


72 


38 


1 


3 


4 


153 


150 


120 


20 


10 





43 


45 


28 


114 


142 


102 


35 


30 


33 


$914,163 


$1,745,573 


$1,182,640 


1,789,589 


$161,101,959 


$108,649,645 



47 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

2003 2004 2005 

Electrical Permits 1,156 1,280 1,245 

Fees Collected $112,974 $182,964 $228,452 



PLUMBING, GAS FITTING AND SEWER 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conduced as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 

2003 2004 2005 

Plumbing Permits 
Plumbing Fees Collected 
Gas Permits 
Gas Fees Collected 
Seals 
Seal Fees Collected $200 $80 $260 



743 


903 


851 


$43,402 


$63,374 


$71,317 


646 


649 


685 


$30,861 


$30,360 


$38,581 


3 


4 


5 



48 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 



The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources 
and to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw. Additionally, the Commission acquires and 
manages land for conservation passive recreation and watershed protection purposes. Over 
1,800 acres of land are under the control and custody of the Commission. 



Conservation Commission Meetings 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area Delineation 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Extension Permits 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Ticket Fines Collected 



2003 



2004 



2005 



22 


25 


24 


197 


192 


189 





2 


6 


22 


65 


32 


2 


8 


9 


20 


30 


12 


108 


56 


81 

7 
32 


32 


42 


47 


37 


28 


2 


11 


15 


7 


9 


8 


24 


6 





$6,000 


$26,709 


$41,170 








$9,200 



49 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with 
State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes 
primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land 
use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland 
pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as 
proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of 
Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year 
terms. 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 

Board of Health Meetings 

Plan Reviews 

Restaurant Inspections 

Environmental/Sanitary Code Inspections 

Complaints & Investigations 

Administrative Hearings 

Court Actions 

Fees Collected $ 

HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 

Outreach Clinics 

Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 

Attendance 

Office Visits 

Home Visits 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 

Influenza Immunization 

Pneumonia Immunization 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin testing Attendance 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 



50 



1003 2004 2005 



11 


11 


14 


210 


206 


222 


110 


93 


153 


167 


185 


194 


250 


309 


277 


6 


14 


10 


5 


12 


12 


',412 


$135,143 


$137,105 


2003 


2004 


2005 


21 


21 


21 


293 


232 


233 


51 


49 


51 


692 


688 


568 


225 


200 


244 


26 


34 


31 


i 30 


20 


20 


1420 


1455 


1668 


37 


48 


30 


10 


11 


12 


131 


72 


92 


20 


15 


12 


7 


11 


7 


. 17 


90 


15 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS (Cont.) 

Latent T.B. Infection Reports 

Other Clinic Programs (Stroke Prevention, 

Public Health Week & Hepatitis A. Vaccine) 



2003 



2004 



2005 

19 

212 



MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE IMMUNIZATION CLINICS 





2003 


2004 


2005 


Andover High School 


65 


— 


— 


Summer Clinics 


49 


~ 


54 


Office Clinics and Appointments 


~ 


70 


6 


COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 










2003 


2004 


2005 


Animal Bites 


17 


32 


25 


Chicken Pox 


27 


7 


11 


Campylobacter 


4 


12 


7 


E.coli0157.H7 





1 





Giardia 


3 


3 


4 


Hepatitis A 


2 


1 


2 


Hepatitis B 


6 


8 


7 


Hepatitis C 


5 


8 


4 


Lyme Disease 


17 


19 


41 


Pertussis 


6 


9 


4 


Meningitis (Bacterial) 








1 


Meningitis (Viral) 


2 





3 


Salmonella 


5 


7 


5 


Strep Pneumonia 


3 





2 


Group A Strep 


2 


1 





Group B Strep 


1 


3 





Tuberculosis 





1 


1 


Legionella 











Yersinia Entercolitica 


1 





1 


Malaria 











Influenza A 


— 


3 





Suspect Disease Requiring Follow-Up 


— 


31 


10 


Cryptosporidiosis 


— 


~ 


2 


Ehrlichiosis 


— 


— 


1 


HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 





The Healthy Communities Tobacco Program, a State-funded entity, is a collaborative made 
up of Boards of Health from twelve communities which is charged with the responsibility of 
enforcing Andover's bylaws that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. This organization is 



51 



also responsible for enforcing the State-wide ban of smoking in enclosed public places (including 
restaurants and bars) that went into effect in July of 2004. Healthy Communities serves as the 
Andover Board of Health's agent on all tobacco control issues. With Andover as the lead agency, the 
collaborative includes Haverhill, Lynnfield, Newburyport, Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North 
Andover, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham and Topsfield. 

Questions or comments on tobacco control laws (including issues of smoking in public 
places, smoking cessation resources, and tobacco sales to minors) can be directed to Healthy 
Communities at 978-749-8999. 

TOBACCO SALES TO YOUTH IN ANDOVER 

In an effort to curb tobacco sales to youth, Healthy Communities conducts quarterly 
compliance checks to make certain local establishments adhere to laws prohibiting sales of tobacco 
to minors. During these compliance checks, 16 and 17-year-old youth, under the supervision of 
Healthy Communities' staff, enter stores asking to purchase cigarettes. If a sale is made, a fine is 
issued. In cases of second and third offenses, the Andover Board of Health has normally suspended 
the tobacco sales license of the establishment. 

Over the past three years, Healthy Communities has recorded the number of illegal tobacco 
sales to youth in Andover during its compliance checks. In 2003, the rate of illegal tobacco sales in 
Andover was 14% (6 illegal sales out of 44 compliance checks); in 2004, the rate of illegal tobacco 
sales was 9.5% (4 sales out of 42 attempts) and in 2005, the rate was 11% (6 sales out of 56 checks). 

Healthy Communities is committed to establishing innovative policy and enforcement 
mechanisms that significantly lowers the tobacco sales rate below the persistent 12% range. As a 
first step, it is now planning a forum with pharmacies to explore new ideas on how to tighten up the 
manner in which to sell tobacco, a highly addictive and deadly product. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Bioterrorism Preparedness Coalition (a.k.a "The Coalition") is 
comprised of seven community health departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, 
Methuen, North Reading, Reading and Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and 
community capability to respond to public health emergencies. The town of Andover serves as the 
fiscal agent for the Coalition. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant awarded 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Coalition in its third year of funding is 
charged with the following: linking local health departments to the Health and Homeland Alert 
Network; identifying and planning for local emergency dispensing (medication and vaccine) site 
clinics; developing risk communication plans to inform the public in the event of a public health 
emergency; strengthening comprehensive emergency management plans to include public health 
response; participating in a public health partnership bioterrorism drill by the Massachusetts 



52 



Department of Public Health; planning for a pandemic influenza, and providing for continuity of 
operations should several employees fall ill. 

PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of 
the Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the 
recommendations of the Master Plan. 



During 2005, Andover's affordable housing inventory continued to stay above the 10% 
threshold and at year's end stood at 1 1.6%. Staff worked with the Andover Housing Partnership 
Committee (AHPC) on a concerted strategy to preserve existing affordable housing units that are in 
danger of being lost in three "expiring use" developments: 1 ) Brookside Estates - efforts resulted in 
the preservation of 42 affordable units; 2) One hundred percent (100%) of the units at Andover 
Commons were preserved to remain affordable until 202 1 and 3) Staff and the AHPC are working to 
achieve a similar outcome at Riverview Commons for 220 units of existing rental housing - 55 of 
which are affordable to incomes less than 80% of the area wide median. A $50,000 grant was 
awarded to Andover from the North Shore HOME Consortium for a first-time home buyers down 
payment assistance program to be used at Brookside Estates for persons making less than 60% of the 
median income and as of December 31, 2005, $30,000 was used for down payment assistance for 
three worthy local applicants. A long outstanding recommendation of the Master Plan and Housing 
Plan to create a Housing Trust Fund was approved at the Annual Town Meeting and a Board of 
Trustees was appointed in the Fall of 2005. 

The division staff worked on open space preservation and wrestled with numerous 
subdivision proposals to achieve the best possible development on the Town's diminishing vacant 
lands. The staff and the Planning Board began encouraging Low Impact Development techniques to 
new development proposals to enhance compatibility with existing neighborhoods and mitigate 
environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. 

The Essex Street Corridor Study was completed in October. The study identifies existing and 
future traffic and parking constraints and proposes feasible solutions. The proposed solutions would 
help to improve existing congestion through the area, improve safety and improve aesthetics. 

Throughout 2005, the Planning Division continued its efforts toward downtown 
improvements and work on major transportation system projects. Working with Design Consultants, 
the 100% design plans for the Main Street Improvement Project were submitted to the Massachusetts 
Highway Department. The Planning Division assisted the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission 
and Massachusetts Highway Department in fmalization of the 1-93 Corridor Study, and began serious 
work on a new interchange on 1-93 that would serve the Lowell Junction industrial area. 



53 



PLANNING DIVISION STATISTICS 



2003 2004 2005 



22 


27 


21 


146 


141 


105 


7 


9 


4 


4 


4 


1 


23 


33 


27 



Planning Board Meetings 
Public Hearings Held 
Definitive Subdivision Plans 
Preliminary Subdivision Plans 
ANR Plans 

Site Plan Reviews 14 7 7 

Special Permits issued 25 23 6 

Lot Releases & Clearance Certificates Issued 55 44 27 

Warrant Articles Reported 25 14 18 

Subdivision Guarantees $291,850 $405,412 $278,275 

Street Acceptances 4 4 6 

Revenues Generated $57,113 $71,368 $31,728 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40 A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and the 
Town Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall at the 
Memorial Library, Elm Square. The Board of Selectmen appoints five regular members and four 
associate members. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following 
areas: 

A variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A special permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other Administrative 

official; 

A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town of Andover 

(Comprehensive Permit, M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 



54 



Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations conducts public hearings. 
Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in 
question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented at the hearing, 
and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk and recorded at 
the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the appeal period. 



ZONING STATISTICS 
Hearings Held* 
Deliberation Meetings Held 
Petitions Filed** 
Petitions Granted 
Petitions Denied 



2003 



93 



15 



Petitions Withdrawn, Dismissed, Continued 1 1 
Fees Collected**** $27,230 



2004 



103 

5 
18 

$36,182 



2005 



35 


25 


14 


26 


22 


12 


119 


98 


j 1^*** 



107 



16 



5 
$41,435 



* These meetings often include both public hearings and deliberations. 

** Some petitions contain multiple requests but pay only one fee. They are counted once. 

*** 1 12 petitions were filed and heard in 2005 - 7 were filed in 2005 & heard in 2006. Ten 
cases were deliberated in 2005 but one was filed in 2003 and nine were filed in 2004. 
One was filed in 2005 and will be heard in 2006. 

**** Only the fees collected between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2005 are included in 
the total. 



55 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



950 

900 

850 

800 

750 -1 

700 

650 j 

600 \ 

550 

500 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



875 



905 
^_ 880 



827 



699 



715 719 



749 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 



♦ 74 


«8 / \ 




"55 


V 












^V44 * 


► 46 


















JU 















1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



BUILDING PERMITS 



1,483 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



PERMIT FEE REVENUE 



in 



$1,800,000 
$1,700,000 
$1,600,000 1 
$1,500,000 
$1,400,000 
$1,300,000 
$1,200,000 
$1,100,000 
$1,000,000 
$900,000 - 
$800,000 
$700,000 - 
$600,000 
$500,000 - 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 






as 
-tcr 

-r-s — 



Ln 
m 



ro 



U3 

Lfl 



00 

m 



-g- vo - 

I*- ro 

IV rsj 

00 *^ 

Ln 



o 

CTv 
00 



#* <& s* s- # <^ # ^ 



56 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



60 
50 

40 -| 
30 
20 -\ 

10 




HI 

7 



28 



35 



26 



27 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



□ ANR Plans 

O Definitive Subdivision 



nSite Plan Reviews 

□ Preliminary Subdivision 



VACCINE DISTRIBUTION 



20,000 -, 

19,000 

18,000 

17,000 

16,000 

15,000 - 

14,000 - 

13,000 

12,000 

11,000 

10,000 - 

9,000 - --8,23.4 

8,000^- 6,890 n 

7,000 -15,-87-9 ,-, 

6,000 -jr-l 

5,000 J 

4,000 ] 

3,000 4 



19,452 

18,535 



14,406 

137474— _r-,Z 



n -12,122- 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

SURVEILLANCE 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



57 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings (over 1.3 million sq. ft), parks and grounds, cemetery, 
forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a director who is supported by four superintendents, an 
administrative assistant, construction project manager/clerk of the works (temporary employees 
during major construction projects), work control center coordinator, two part-time accounts 
payable clerks, budget/contracts analyst, facilities coordinator and a diverse group of skilled and 
semi-skilled maintenance trades persons, vehicle mechanics, custodians, and grounds and tree 
workers. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS / HIGHLIGHTS 

Plant & Facilities received the annual regional ADA Champion Award for their exemplary 
effort in ensuring equal access for people with disabilities in the Town of Andover at the 
annual meeting of the northeast Independent Living program on October 18, 2005. 
Joseph Piantedosi, Plant & Facilities Department Director was one of several recipients who 
received a regional Director's Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency "for 
exceptional performance" in implementing a state of the art radon mitigation system during 
the construction of High Plain Elementary & Wood Hill Middle Schools. 
The Town was awarded "Tree City USA" for the sixth consecutive year. 
Initiated formation of the Town Energy Task Force - Numerous measures implemented 
which have already resulted in substantial savings and cost avoidance to Town/School energy 
costs. 
■ New Town/School wide utility/fuel tracking and forecasting system implemented. 



58 



New fee schedule written and approved for all Town/School buildings and fields. 

New Town wide networked access control & CCTV security system being installed in 

School buildings. 

Coordinated the donation of the renovation work accomplished at the High School Golden 

Warriors Building with the Friends of Football. 

Coordinated the construction of a new donated 1754 square foot Golden Warriors building at 

the High School Field with the Friends of Football, which should be completed by summer 

2006. Cleared state and local legal hurtles & coordinated approvals with Town & School 

department. 

Reorganization and downsizing of the Cemetery division implemented. 

Over $1.5 million of capital improvement projects implemented in School & Town buildings 

and field projects. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings, which total in excess of 1.3 
million square feet. The two superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of 
Town/School capital improvement projects. Additionally, they provide custodial services to 
Town buildings, mail delivery to all buildings, maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street 
light poles. The two divisions completed 3,675 work orders in 2005. 

2003 2004 2005 

School Labor Hours 

School - Total Labor & Material Costs 

Town Labor Hours 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs 

**Does not include 278 work orders that were used to track Town and School capital projects, 
including support to the new schools and the Public Safety Center Project. 
Capital Projects: School: SI 06,880 Town: 5356,677 

Warrant Articles: School: 51,645.849 Town: 51,474,775 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Installed ADA compliant locksets and re-keyed all rooms in the School Administration 
Building and the Copy Center. 

■ Doherty Middle School 

- Asbestos flooring remediation & flooring replacements (main entrance corridor). 
~ New intercom system installed 

- New walk in freezer & storage facility installed 
~ New kitchen fire suppression system installed 



59 



20,884 
S847,432 


19,345 

$887,077 


22,251 
$1,093,861 


10,756 
S662,501 


5,939 
$415,476 


7,470 
$427,569 



- Converted dish wash room to food sales room 

Bancroft School 

- Emergency power upgrade including new emergency generator 

- Bathroom renovations south east corner upper & lower floors 

- Replaced kindergarten windows 

- Installed new vinyl tile in nine classrooms first floor 

~ Installed new carpet tile in nine classrooms second floor 

~ Install new roof membrane over media center 

~ Exterior main entrance curbing repaired 

~ Replaced all classroom bubblers 

West Elementary School 

- Phase IV renovations completed - first & fifth grade classrooms/corridors etc 

- Upgraded classroom lights and ballasts in C-wing & replaced classroom and corridor 
lighting in the front sections of the building.. 

~ Crawl space asbestos remediation completed front section of school 

- Insulated crawl space steam pipes 

- Installed new roof over first grade area 

- Auditorium lighting evaluation completed 

- New ADA compliant lock sets installed and re-keyed building 

- Replaced seven leaking boiler sections 

- Replaced four exhaust fans 

Sanborn School 

- Repairs to modular classroom units 

- Replaced leaking boiler sections 

Andover High School 

- Classroom painting - nine rooms plus main offices 

- Re-lamped stadium lighting at Lovely Field 

- HVAC unit replacements - six rooftop units replaced 

- New controls installed on main boilers 

- Collins Center roof re-seaming 

- New floor surface added to Collins Center stage floor 

- Installed exhaust fan on set room roof 

West Middle School 

~ Installed new hot water heater and storage tank 

- Install drainage system in crawl space 

- Insulated ceiling area of crawl space to correct condensation problem 
~ New cabinets & counters installed in teachers lounge 

- Built second floor teachers restroom 

~ Installed two new sinks in two girls bathrooms 

- Installed j anitor closet sink by cafe 

- Facilitated Engineering Lab 

60 



- Replaced six leaking boiler sections 

Shawsheen School 

- New flooring three classrooms 

- Window replacements - circular windows & gym 

- Nine new fan powered convectors rest rooms & stairwells 

- Relocation & restoration computer room/music room 

- Exterior east wall sealed & removed bird nesting problem east tower 

- New storage building installed rear of school 

South School 

~ Installed new carpet tile in media center 

Wood Hill Middle/High Plain Elementary Schools 

- High Plain concrete sidewalk repairs 

- Poured new sidewalk at Wood Hill main entrance 

- Replaced band room floor 

- New Site signs installed 

~ Installed bollards to prevent vehicle access at basket ball court area 

All Schools 

- New security system being installed in multiple school buildings 

- Added weather striping to 36 exterior doors 

~ AHERA (asbestos) inspection/corrective actions 

- Gym floors refinished at South School, Sanborn School and Dunn Gym at the High 
School 

- Playgrounds repairs - wood carpet installed multiple schools 

- Summer PM/Repairs - Boilers, filters, painting, plumbing, masonry etc. 

- Fire Alarm Testing - all schools completed 

- Completed School wide program to comply with State lead/copper drinking water 
guideline. Extensive testing and hardware replacements. 

Town 

~ New diesel fuel tank and new fuel pump stations added to Town Yard fuel depot 

~ Air handler #3 serving main floor at Library building replaced 

~ New roof installed on Building Maintenance building at Red Spring Road 

- New doors and other energy improvements completed at the Town Yard, Forestry and 
Water Shops 

- Installed 76 new set back thermostats at the Town Offices and Town Yard buildings 

- Replaced loop detectors for traffic lights at Haggett's Pond Road and North Main 
Street/Stevens Street 

~ New traffic signal controllers on two signals on River Road 
~ Installed new roof top exhaust fans on Vehicle Maintenance Garage 
~ Installed electric door openers on Town Offices and School Administration Building 
restrooms 



61 



PARKS AND GROUNDS, CEMETERY & FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, snow removal, and moving 
heavy items such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area and building and 
repairing park benches and tables. 

The Parks & Grounds Division completed 110 work orders (72 - Town and 38 - Schools) totaling 
$816,386 

Schools Town Total 



Man Hours 
Labor & Materials 


6,687 
$263,383 


18,696 
$553,003 


25,383 
$816,386 


Capital Projects 
Warrant Articles 


$22,162 
$32,726 


$14,348 
$12,003 


$36,510 
$44,729 


PARKS DIVISION 









This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1.4 million square 
feet of lawn areas. Ball fields and lawns are located on all School and Town building sites and 
other Town property including Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower 
Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, Town-owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, 
triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) 
for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, 
watering, over-seeding, liming fertilizing and weed and insect control. This division also 
maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow 
removal at all Town buildings. 



•&* 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Total reconstruction of the two 60 foot baseball diamonds at West Elementary and Sanborn 

schools with grass infield and two zones of irrigation. 

New drainage system installed at Sanbom School baseball field along first baseline with 60 

ft. diamond, 190 ft. of 6 inch perforated drainage pipe installed. 

Provided support to West Elementary Schools new playground - removed old equipment, 

re-graded site and added loam and seed. 

Aerated and seeded Wood Hill athletic fields 3 times during growing season, added 60 cubic 

yards of loam to low areas then graded and seeded. 

Over seeded and aerified Sanbom and South soccer fields twice during the season. 

Over seeded and aerified Doherty Middle football field as well as Rec Park softball field 

twice during the season. 



62 



Over seeded and aerified upper and lower Shawsheen fields three times during the growing 

season. 

Field irrigation system installed at Shawsheen school 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 2005, there were 52 full 
burials, 23 cremations and 111 gravesites sold for a total revenue of $105,510. Cemetery 
operations and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and 
small trees, leaf pickup, Town-wide snow removal and other tasks including grounds 
maintenance in Recreation Park and special projects at other Town facilities. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Extensive pruning of low hanging limbs throughout Cemetery grounds. 

Cemetery staff spread 400 cubic yards of playground safety mulch at all elementary schools 

in Town. 

Assisted PTO groups with landscape improvements and construction of renovated 

playgrounds. 

Started tree removal program on the Cemetery grounds of old, dying and overgrown trees 

and shrubs requested by the Cemetery Trustees. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. The 
majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of 
undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved 
visibility. The Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town and 
maintains the Bald Hill compost site. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Received Tree City U.S.A. designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation for the sixth 

consecutive year. 

Responded to 94 requests for tree work by Town residents. 

Planted eighteen 3 -inch caliper shade trees. 

Responded to eleven emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department. 

Continued monitoring & providing support to the composting operation at Bald Hill (this site 

requires a full day each week for one man and a loader to manage the leaves and grass 

clippings). 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday lighting on Main Street. 

Over 5200 cubic yards of tree debris and stumps were collected and ground up. 

Celebrated Arbor Day on April 29, 2005 at Ballardvale Town Common. Members of the 

Ballardvale Historical Society, Town Selectmen & other Town Officials were in attendance 

for the planting of a three inch caliper Katsura tree. 



63 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent who also is 
responsible for purchasing and material's management for all Plant and Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant and 
Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles and coordinates the purchasing for all new Town vehicles. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 153 Town vehicles and major pieces 

of equipment, 1 8 School and Town buildings emergency generators and 42 smaller pieces of 

equipment. Completed 1,046 work orders totaling 4261 man hours and $385,079 labor & 

material. 

Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 

Supported snow removal operations, maintaining equipment and installation and removal of 

DPW sander units. 

Maintained and repaired all Fire apparatus as well as assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the ladder trucks hydraulic and pump systems. 

Annual Fuel Consumption in gallons for all Town departments is as follows: 

2003 2004 2005 



Gasoline 


85,151 


91,607 


89,873 


Diesel 


45,637 


40,256 


44,537 


Total Gallons 


130,788 


131,863 


134,410 


MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 







A Facilities Coordinator and part-time clerk manage the Municipal Facilities Division of 
Plant & Facilities. This division manages the Andover Town House (Old Town Hall) as well as 
all Town and School field schedules and rentals, School building schedules, and rentals and park 
rentals. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Revised Town House brochure and website to provide more comprehensive information to 
potential customers & automated the master rental schedules for all fields and buildings. 
Implemented low cost Internet advertising for the Town House that has returned over 150 
inquires and 17 confirmed events. It has also prompted websites to offer free advertising, 
and as a result the Town House comes up more frequently in Internet searches. 
Coordinated the rescheduling of events at all School buildings to support the Energy Task 
force consolidation recommendations which has resulted in substantial energy savings for the 
schools. 



64 



Coordinated nine meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and town officials to 
support field maintenance and schedule programs and special projects. 

RENTAL ACTIVITY 

In 2005, the rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the 
accounting system. For every rental request received, a hand-written permit is issued and an 
invoice is generated. Additional categories were also added to show facility use more accurately. 

Schools 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town. Growth was seen in Community 
Service Division and School enrichment program uses. There was a slight decline in school 
rental permits as a result of implementing the energy conservation program. Five schools had 
gym rentals only after 6:00PM, and four schools housed mostly Town and School programs. 
Weekend use of schools is not permitted from January until after April vacation. 

Fields 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 2005. The High School, Department 
of Community Services, and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is not field space available for programs to grow and/or expand. 

Recreation Park 

Recreation Park is available for private rentals and is also used by the schools, 
Department of Community Services, and youth leagues. 

Old Town Hall 

The function hall at Old Town Hall is available for rental seven days a week. The 
Department of Community Services is the most frequent weekday user, and they also use the hall 
for various evening dances. Andover Youth Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and 
other events at the Town House. The Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the 
Town House each year. 

Permits issued by the Municipal Buildings Division are as follows: 

2003 2004 2005 

871 581 * 

99 103 

123 134 

Total Permits Issued 809 1,093 818 

* The method for tracking permits changed. Beginning in 2005, the 581 permits does not 
represent a decrease in activity (one permit per group vs. one permit per event). 



Schools 


615 


Town Buildings 


79 


Fields 


115 



65 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



TOWN BUILDING 

RENTAL PERMITS 

(Includes Town Hall & Sr. Ctr.) 



160 
140 - 
120 - 
100 

80 

60 J 

40 \ 

20 




59 



2002 



^ 



99 



100 



79 



2003 



2004 



2005 



J 



r 

1,000 - 
900 
800 - 
700 - 
600 - 
500 - 
400 - 
300 - 
200 
100 - 
n . 


SCHOOL BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 




> 




871 












DID 




581 






- 















_>io 





— 


u 


2002 2003 2004 2005 



r 




FIELD RENTAL PERMITS 




i 


(Includes Rec Park) 

ifin 




140 - 

120 - 


115 


123 




134 




100 - 
















80 - 


76 














60 




















40 - 




















20 - 




















n 




















2002 2003 2004 


2005 


L 


<* 



A 



SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



120 
110 -\ 
100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 \ 

20 

10 - 
- 



66 



111 



2002 



81 



53 



2003 2004 2005 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and 
bids, performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: new 
sidewalk construction and safety improvements on Moraine Street and drainage improvements 
on Lowell Street, Morton Street, Rocky Hill Road and several other locations. Inspections and 
field tests were performed during the reconstruction of Stevens Street at Powder Mill Square. 
The Division also performed field survey and preliminary design to prepare for upcoming 
reconstruction of existing sidewalks on Chestnut Street, Whittier Street and a portion of North 
Main Street. 

Staff assisted and coordinated with consultants, contractors and residents during the 
design and construction of the sewer extensions for the Contracts No. 2, 3 & 4 of the South Main 
Street / Ballardvale Road areas. Various duties performed included utility markouts, inspections 
and resolving complaints. Staff members also worked closely with the consultant on the design 
and review of the Main Street Reconstruction project, including site meetings with many 
abutting property owners. 

Implementation activities to comply with new EPA Phase II Stormwater Management 
regulations were performed. A total of 97 stormdrain outlets were field located and inspected in 
high priority sub-watershed areas such as the Rogers Brook, Lower Shawsheen River and Skug 
River watersheds; data was also added to the GIS system to create a town wide drainage map as 
part of the requirements. Activity reports from various town departments working on the 
program were documented and then utilized by the Town's consultant in preparation and 
submission of the annual Stormwater Management report to EPA in April. 

Work was also performed to coordinate the development of the Town's GIS system with 
the consultant, install software, review preliminary and final data, checkplots and database 
design, development of drainage, water and sewer utility layers and updating of the parcel maps 
for the Town Assessor and printed the necessary copies for other Town departments. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of eleven Town streets was prepared while 
assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on these streets. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board checking for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of 
proposed roads and utilities. Road and utility construction in new subdivisions and site 
developments such as Harwich Lane, Shandel Circle, Woodman Ridge, Crenshaw Drive, Rolling 
Green, Casco Crossing and numerous other sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance 
with Town construction standards. Performance Bond amounts were also calculated as 



67 



requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Bay State Gas Co., Verizon, Mass Electric, AT&T Broadband and other private contractors, 
were issued and the necessary utility markouts and inspections were performed. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 

ANNUAL SUMMARY 





2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 


2,283 


448 


640 


427 


595 


Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 


37,600 


50 


700 







Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 


8,623 


15,700 


2,200 


1,325 


1,220 


Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 


4,188 





5,736 








Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


4.3 


6.8 


5.8 


4.8 


4.5 


Street Opening Permits Issued & 
Inspected 


145 


148 


276 


298 


203 


Sewer Connections reviewed for Board 
of Health 


25 


35 


197 


160 


242 


Assessors Maps updated 


45 


48 


52 


51 


59 


Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# 
plans/# lots) 


18/68 


16/53 


26/98 


21/46 


12/58 


Performance Bonds figured for Planning 
Board 


6 


9 


9 


6 


12 


Drainage outfalls located, mapped 
and inspected 




22 


197 


298 


97 


Subdivision Construction 
Inspections/Tests: 












Water mains (ft.) 


9,105 


5,734 


4,287 


8,133 


13,249 


Sewer mains (ft.) 


3,920 


2,787 


3,591 


1,754 


7,829 


Drain lines (ft.) 


4,480 


2,729 


1,760 


3,002 


3,234 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


1,580 


5,388 


4,586 


2,807 


1,389 


Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 
Top coarse (ft.) 


2,800 
3,150 


1,586 
8,432 


1,997 

5,345 


1,971 

2,867 


7,524 
2,328 


Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 


7 


6 


5 


5 


7 



68 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the Fall, Spring and Summer 
months, two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning Winter sand off all streets and 
cleaning road construction areas. A few days per week the sweepers start work at 5:00 A.M. to 
take advantage of low traffic and parking conditions especially in business areas. The Highway 
Division is responsible for the maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. The Division 
also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to acceptance as public ways. 
The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all storm water culverts and 
drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as maintenance of water 
courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. The Highway Division is the lead agency 
responsible for snow and ice removal and flood control measures; other Town divisions assist in 
these operations. 





2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Number of streets resurfaced 




30 


9 


15 


12 


Total number of miles of road 
resurfaced 


4.3 


6.8 


5.8 


4.8 


4.8 


Total number of feet of curbs 
constructed 


23,500 


14,282 


11,215 


12,434 


8,000 


Catch basins cleaned 


397 


231 


1,292 


1,350 


1134 


Storm drains/culverts cleaned 




3 


113 


220 


230 


Catch basins repaired 


24 


51 


34 


53 


106 


Storm drains repaired 


5 





5 


6 


10 


Snow storms 






12 


5 


14 


Sanding events 






54 


40 


43 


Signs repaired/installed 






400 


460 


428 


Masonry wall repairs 






4 


6 


8 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2005, the Treatment Plant processed more than 2.4 billion gallons of water to 
deliver over 2.2 billion gallons of finish water delivered to the distribution system. This quantity 
averages out to a daily mean volume of 6.72 million gallons, with a summer-month daily 
maximum of 13.6 million gallons per day. To augment available water supplies, 1.17 billion 
gallons were diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump 
station. The Fish Brook station was online for a total of 134 days over the course of the year. 
The chart below illustrates the breakdown of total water consumption. 



69 



Lawn/irrigation * 
13% 



Water Consumption 2005 



Municipal 
2% 



Commercial 

28% 




Residential 
46% 



Industrial/Ag 
11% 

During PEAK watering season, this can increase to 33% 



Weekly, monthly and quarterly sampling was completed, as well as quality 
assurance/quality control testing required to maintain full certification of the Laboratory for the 
analysis of potable and non-potable water. During the four compliance periods of 2005, volatile 
organic compounds, secondary contaminants, disinfection byproducts and perchlorate levels 
were monitored in the finished water. Annual testing for bromate, nitrate and nitrite in the 
finished water and Abbott Well was completed, and supplementary testing of the raw and 
finished water for synthetic organic compounds was also done. All results were found to be in 
compliance with United States Environmental Protection Agency and Massachusetts Department 
of Environmental Protection standards and regulations. Weekly monitoring for coliform bacteria 
was conducted at the plant, throughout the distribution system and at Abbott Well; there were no 
violations of the Total Coliform Rule for 2005 and regular monitoring for Giardia, 
Cryptosporidium and enteric viruses suggests 99.9% removal of these organisms during the 
treatment process. 

Upgrade of the ozone facility w as completed on schedule and thirty percent under budget. 
The aging air-prep system was replaced with a highly efficient liquid oxygen-generated ozone 
system, and the transition included installation of an 11,000-gallon liquid oxygen tank, three 
vaporizers, two 500-pound-per-day ozone generators and a side-stream injection system. 
Completion of these improvements resulted in an overall more cost-effective and efficient 
treatment process. 

Routine and preventative maintenance was completed on treatment plant equipment 
including low and high service, backwash and chemical feed pumps and chemical storage units. 
Sedimentation sludge collection equipment was inspected, cleaned and replaced as required. 
Further improvements included treatment plant server replacement and a Supervisory Control 



70 



and Data Acquisition system upgrade, as well as implementation of a 5-year plant security 
enhancement program. Routine inspections of safety supplies and equipment were conducted, as 
well as maintenance of a comprehensive Materials Safety Data Sheet and safety resources 
library. To improve the overall energy efficiency of the plant, all older, constant-speed drives 
were replaced with variable-speed drives to increase motor efficiency plant-wide and a door, 
window and insulation replacement program was instituted. 





2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Hydrants Repaired 


87 


117 


93 


121 


137 


Hydrants Replaced 


7 


14 


42 


72 


27 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 


383 


278 


252 


286 


231 


Hydrants Flushed 


235 


183 


201 


178 


152 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


23 


35 


18 


251 


15 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


17 


11 


6 


14 


7 


House Services Renewed 


21 


35 


53 


28+ 


34 


New Water Meter 
Accounts/Installations 


98 


52 


113 


145 


105 


Old Water Meters Replaced 


379 


286 


461 


166 


130 


Water Meters bench checked 


17 


12 


26 


15 


23 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


209 


194 


183 


126 


106 


60 Gate Boxes Adjusted 


51 


48 


31 


63 


60 


Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2,377 


2,388 


2,167 


2,199 


2,458 


Average daily gallons pumped (in 
million gal.) 


6.51 


6.54 


5.94 


6.03 


6.72 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


12.976 


14.505 


12.857 


10.772 


14.296 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, Shawsheen Village, 
and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 93 miles of sanitary 
sewers along with eight (8) new pumping stations and 5,850 connections with an additional 24 
miles of mainline sewer and 1600 connections scheduled to come on line over the next three (3) 
years. The raw sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by 
means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's 
Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for treatment. 





2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


67 


53 


48 


37 


35 


Sewer Main Rodded - Regular 
Maintenance 


44 


39 


41 


108 


60 


Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 


7 


3 


2 


5 


2 



71 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 

Andover has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant, 
Wheelabrator, located in North Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, #1 thru #7 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
$30/ton. We earned a total credit of $50,890 last year. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass 
clippings compost site on the High Plain Road, near Bald Hill. The Town screens and grinds the 
material annually with the compost being available to Town residents. 





2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Tons of residential refuse 
collected 


13,142 


13,280 


13,636 


13,452 


12,786 


Tons of mixed residential paper 


2,479 


2,540 


2,607 


2,596 


2,563 


Tons of corrugated containers 


275 


340 


384 


399 


356 


Tons of glass recycled 


488 


532 


566 


593 


645 


Tons of steel/tin containers 
recycled 


37 


31 


34 


35 


38 


Tons of #1 thru #7 plastics 


37 


31 


33 


35 


38 


Tons of aluminum materials 


37 


32 


33 


35 


38 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping 
composted 


3,000 


3,000 


3,375 


6,200 


7,000 



72 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



( \ 


STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 


23,000 
21,000 




♦ 22104 ^ 21750 


19,000 


/ \ / \ 


17,000 


/ \ / \ 


/ \ / \ 


t 15 < 000 
ff 13,000 

11,000 

9,000 

7,000 

5,000 


/ \ / \ 


X / 14350 \H334 


4 12115 \ / \ 


/ #10000 \ 


/ 8000* 


♦ 6075 






L * 



WATER TREATED 



3,000 

2,800 

2,600 - 

2,400 

2,200 

2,000 

1,800 

1,600 - 

1,400 -■ 

1,200 

1,000 



2452 



2075 



2102 



2377 2338 
n M 2167 2200 



2458 



/ 






^ 









S 



V 



SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 



18,000 i 
16,000 i 
14,000 
12,000 
10,000 -j 
8,000 -j 



6,000 



,*S$WV 



D Refuse D Paper 



D Glass 



w 



STREET RESURFACING 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



73 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is the informational, educational, and cultural heart of the 
Andover community. The library is the place of first resort for traditional and innovative library 
materials, services, and programs. It also serves as a community platform for information-based 
technological innovation. The library continually strives to maintain a standard of exceptional 
service that contributes to a higher quality of life for all members of the community at every 
stage of their lives. 



The Library is continually re-inventing itself to better meet the library-related needs of all 
ages of the Andover community. Since the opening of the Teen Room in 2001, the Library has 
re-directed staff to serving this age group. Both after school and in the evenings, Library staff 
are in the room to work with the youth of the town and help them use our resources 
appropriately. Each year, more and more students come to the Library after school and in the 
evenings to do homework, use the computers, read and meet their friends. With the 30 chairs 
and 7 computers available, the Library does not have the resources to meet the needs of the 
hundreds of 12 to 18 year olds for whom the Library has become a sanctuary during the hours 
between school and dinner or later. While we are exceptionally proud of the work we have done 
to make the Library a safe and inviting place for youth, their need for after-school activities is 
immense and more must be done, rather than less. 

In addition to working with the Teens, the Library has accomplished many goals over the 
past year, a few of which I would like to bring to your attention. 

The Library completed the second and final year of a federally funded grant to better serve 
people with disabilities. These projects allow the Library to serve all of its library users 
better. Particular activities completed were: 

~ The completion of new public service desks at Reference and Circulation. 
~ Design and installation of large, easy-to-read, signs. 
~ Installation of Kurzweil Learning Disabilities Center. 

The Circulation Department greatly increased the number of dvds available for public use by 
collecting a $1 fee resulting in $30,000 available for new dvds and other audio-visual 
materials. In addition, more books were made available through new browsing collections 
and additional downloadable e audio titles. The Circulation Department began a Wednesday 
night independent film series. 

The Reference Department marked the 5 th anniversary of 24/7 service. Over 10,000 
questions have been answered online. The reference staff increased its marketing efforts to 
businesses through its participation in the Merrimack Valley Chamber of Commerce Expo. 
The staff also began "one on one" classes on Internet searching for Library patrons and 
increased reader's advisory through a more active development of staff selections on the 
Library's homepage. 



74 



Over 8,131 people attended 152 programs offered by the Community Services Department. 
The library's month-long series on fishing attracted the most attendees with concerts and 
other programs on crafts and genealogy also attracting many attendees. The Friends of the 
Library had a record setting year raising money to support library programs. Over 8,000 
hours were volunteered. 

The Children's Room carried out active program of services for preschool and elementary 
age children including the implementation of a federally funded "Mother Goose Asks Why' 
grant that linked science topics with children's books for children ages 3-7 and their families. 
Four new computers were installed in the Children's Room and a Children's Librarian is now 
available in the afternoons to work with children on the computers. 

The Teen Room continues to be used by many dozens of middle and high school age students 
in the afternoon and evening and the teens carried out several programs with the Children's 
Room, including "Harry Potter Day". The first ever "Teen Poetry Contest" was held. 

The Technical Services Department continued to work behind the scenes revamping and 
streamlining ordering and cataloging processes and adding new formats to make more 
materials available for our library users. 

The Information Technology Department carried out a long list of projects to improve 
services including the installation of new PCs, the upgrade of servers and re-routing of the 
network, the creation of a Historical Houses database, the setting up of a podcast for the Teen 
Room and a blog for the Children's Room, the retrofit of patron PCs with latest generation 
memory card reader/writers and USB 2.0 front ports, creation of digital floor plans of library, 
the networking of 130+ CD-ROMs of census and vital records data for in-house patron 
access, and the setting up open source web log analysis software for web server. 

Inter-Library Loan staff reorganized to handle demands imposed by the increasing number of 
inter-library reserves that have grown 700% over the last six years. 

The Friends of the Memorial Hall Library provided incredible support through its 
sponsorships of Library programs and services and raised more than $25,000 through its 
book sales and jazz concerts. 

The Trustees of the Library completed the legal work necessary in creating a foundation for 
further fundraising activities to support library technology. 

As with years past, the Director wishes to finish this report by thanking the Trustees, Friends, 
Staff and everyone in Andover who uses the Library. Memorial Hall Library is truly at the heart 
of the community. 



75 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY STATISTICS 



CIRCULATION 2003 2004 2005 

Adult Print Circulation 
Children's Print Circulation 
Total Print Circulation 



Adult Non-print Circulation 
Children's Non-print Circulation 
Total Non-print Circulation 



OTHER STATISTICS 

Reference Questions 

Electronic Database Use 

PC and Internet Sessions 

Programs 

Program Attendance 

Meeting Room Use 

Reserves Placed 

ILL Loan Requests Received 

ILL Requests Filled 

Volunteer Hours 

Visitors to Library* 



* Based on sample counts four times a year 



185,430 


183,533 


188,432 


162,839 


153,571 


144,231 


348,269 


337,104 


332,663 


148,641 


135,874 


125,505 


44,232 


39,560 


36,775 


192,873 


175,434 


162,280 



54,236 


56,992 


59,618 


20,144 


19,923 


24,461 


51,911 


51,744 


52,948 


370 


403 


414 


13,798 


12,969 


14,551 


616 


579 


678 


49,954 


69,049 


76,028 


52,659 


68,764 


72,834 


24,255 


30,915 


45,041 


8,019 


8,488 


8,621 


353,301 


418,463 


414,765 



76 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 


*tjU,UUU r 

400,000 j 
350,000 
300,000 
250,000 
200,000 
150,000 
100,000 
en nnn 






(N 
CO 

fH 

rv 
o 
rn 
\n 




m 

u> 
iv 

IN 
IN 

o 
rsj 




o 

Ov 

ui 








to 

jjj 

**? 
rn 

CO 




O 
o 

CO 

CO 

co" 

CO 




o-> 

CO 
rj 
^O 

o 

^r 
in 

CO 




♦-4 

tV 

in 

rn 
in 

*— t 

ro 
m 
in 

ro 

CO 




m 

i 

O 

m 

t 

00 
00 




OU,UUU 


199 


8 1 

c 


99 

3/ 


9 2 
\dl 


00 
lit 


2 


00 


1 2 


00 

D 


2 2 
Ch 


00 

ilc 


3 2 
Irei 


00 

1 


4 2 


00 


5 



55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 



«# 



s? 



PC & INTERNET USE 



51,744 



50,757 




^ 



<$ 
V 



0? 



N 






<V .rCb 



&? 



^ -^ n^ 



.«^ 



^ 



70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 



REFERENCE QUESTIONS 




40,327 












CV .eft 



T> 



& J 



O 



# a# 



ft 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 



200,000 

175,000 

150,000 

125,000 

100,000 

75,000 

50,000 

25,000 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



□ Adult 



□ Children 



77 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover a myriad of 
social, educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility 
for all. Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into 
valued programs for its citizens now and in the future. 

The Division of Community Services (DCS) offers year-round recreational, enrichment 
and cultural programs for residents of all ages. Through the mutual mission of educating its 
residents, the Andover School Department and Community Services have an agreement to open 
the public schools to community use through DCS. After school programs are held system-wide, 
while the majority of the evening adult education programs are housed at Andover High School. 
In addition to the public schools, programs are held at Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, AYS Skate 
Park, the Town House, The Park, Senior Center, Greater Lawrence Regional Technical High 
School and other in-town facilities. Community Services prides itself on transfusing residents' 
ideas into valued programs. Through the Division's vigorous efforts, services to the Town's 
residents are continuously improved. Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of 
community-based instructors, streamlined registration including FAX, VISA/MasterCard, 
overnight mailbox, and cable TV promotion. 

The budget finances four full time staff salaries, maintenance of the buildings at 
Recreation Park and Pomps Pond, the Fourth of July Celebration in The Park and some day-to- 
day operating expenses. In addition to the operating budget, DCS has Town Meeting approval 
for use of a revolving account. Recreational trips, Summer theater programs, enrichment, sports 
and fitness programs, adult education classes and the adult basketball and co-ed softball leagues 
are just some of the programs funded through this account. Revenues to offset the operating 
budget and the programs funded through the revolving account come from user fees. The 
revolving account will assist DCS further by offsetting many expenses that had been funded 
through the operating budget such as printing costs associated with classes and programs, 
advertising and facility rentals. 

Family-oriented activities have been popular such as parent/tot crafts, nature walks and 
the Mother/Son and Father/Daughter dances. Many classes encourage family participation such 
as ballroom dancing, cooking, foreign language, dog obedience, CPR, tennis and fitness classes. 

DCS instructors come from all segments of the community. Professionals, specialists, 
hobby enthusiasts, homemakers, student interns and retired individuals comprise the teaching 
and leadership staff. This varied instructor base provides the ability to offer diverse programs. 
The majority of the instructional staff resides within Andover, however, in several instances, 
DCS is able to bring in quality programs from outside the region. Andover and several other 
North Shore towns are sharing their instructor rosters. Each town has benefited by gleaming 
experienced instructors in areas of needed community interest. This year DCS offered 60 new 
programs for children and adults. Over 150 classes were offered each tri-semester with recent 
enrollments totaling 10,000 individuals. Sports clinics and leagues for children, ballroom 
dancing, Pamper Me Day and tennis continue to be the most popular programs. In addition to 
these classes, DCS offers school vacation programs, after school skiing, trips, playgrounds, 
Summer concerts, special events and a public swimming program at Pomps Pond. 

78 



Improvements to Recreation Park have continued by upgrading the bobber lines and 
rigging improvements to the sailboats. Arsonists struck mid-Summer and burned all of the sails, 
destroyed a sailboat and paddleboat in addition to cutting the bobber lines. Two families 
responded by donating their paddleboats. During the Summer months, DCS serves well over 
13,000 people. The Fourth of July Pancake Breakfast and Horribles Parade attracts between 
3,000 and 5,000 people each year. Three thousand patriotic citizens eat breakfast while a host of 
others cheer their parading neighbors, participate in games and activities and enjoy the concert 
and entertainers. The Summer Concerts in The Park typically attract persons of all ages each 
week for the family musical programs. 

Networking with the community, DCS continues to develop programs in cooperation 
with local businesses, the Andover Historical Society and Town departments. The Division uses 
local resources to compliment its full-time staff. Eight Tax Voucher assistants work along with 
staff for 800 hours by helping with registration, general office duties and after-school and 
evening programming. The Andona Society provided $2,645 in scholarships to low-income 
residents to participate in Summer programs. DCS also awarded 200 hours of alternative service 
projects to residents in need of assistance in order to attend DCS-sponsored activities. In 
addition, numerous students perform community service hours for school, religious education or 
the Alternative Sentencing Program. 

DCS assists the community by encouraging healthy lifestyles including offering a variety 
of fitness programs, courses on wellness and mid-life crisis. Collaboration with the Andover 
Village Improvement Society (A.V.I.S.) has been very successful. Weekend walks on AVIS and 
conservation lands are given by local wardens free of charge. A DCS staff member is the Town's 
designated representative to the United Way during their yearly pledge efforts. Mittens are 
collected each December at numerous locations around the Town including the public schools, 
Library and Senior Center. Thousands of mittens are donated to the needy through this giving 
program. DCS also provides assistance with Town-wide functions for PTO fundraising, Andover 
Youth Foundation and social organizations. 

As technology improves, DCS keeps pace with the computer age. On-line courses are 
offered monthly through a new service with www . ed2 go . com/dcs . This fairly new way for adults 
to learn is perfect for business use while at work or for learning at home. Participants can update 
their skills, discover a new talent or chart a career path at their own pace. Hundreds of courses 
are offered each month. The beauty of an on-line course is that classes will run regardless of the 
enrollment size. 

Budget cuts over the past few years have included office equipment, playground 
apparatus, picnic tables, printing costs for program flyers and rental fees used for programming. 
Consolidation of the traditional Summer playground program to only three sites freed up funding 
to offer an additional playground program geared to middle school students. To address the 
needs of parents looking for a program mimicking a school day, an all-new highly successful 
playground running until 3:00 P.M. was held at Recreation Park. Children were able to access 
the tennis courts, inline rink and pond for swimming. Fieldtrip buses now leave from one 
centralized location enabling DCS to leave some playground staff behind for those not attending 
the trip while reducing staff hours. 



79 



DCS PROGRAM STATISTICS: 



FALL PARTICIPATION 



Fall Classes: 

Holly Balls 
Special Events/Trips 
Kickin' Kids Soccer League 
Total Fall Participation 



Youth ages 2 - 


-18 


1,120 


Adults 




590 

350 
919 
140 



3,119 



WINTER PARTICIPATION 



Winter Classes: 

Bradford Ski 

Kid's Basketball League 

Youth Vacation Basketball 

Father/Daughter, Family & Ballroom Dances 

Special Events/Trips 

Total Winter Participation 



Youth ages 2 - 
Adults 


-18 


1,443 
610 


grades 3-8 




197 


grades 1-3 




209 
364 
338 

235 



3,396 



SUMMER PARTICIPATION 



Summer Classes: 


Youth ages 2-18 


1,534 




Adults 


144 


Special School-Age Children's Programs: 






All-Day Discovery 


grades K-5 


1,750 


Summer Theatre 


grades 2-10 


357 


Drop-in Playground 


grades K-5 


260 


Drop-in Field Trips 


grades K-5 


482 


Special Pre-School Age Children's Programs: 




Half Pints 


ages 4-6 


77 


Park Events 


ages 1-6 


500 


Pomps Pond: 






Stickers 




240 


Daily Attendance 




30+/cars 


Average number of people per day 




150/day 


Concerts: 






The Park 


all ages 


1,550 


Special Events: 






Fourth of July 


all ages 


5,000 


Trips & Events 


all ages 


257 


Co-Ed Adult Softball League 


adults 


600 


TOTAL Summer Participation 




12,751 


TOTAL YEAR-LONG PARTICIPATION 


- 


19,266+ 



80 



DCS STATISTICS 



RECREATION SERVICES REVOLVING 
FUND REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$260, 

S240, 

:;220, 

S200, 

S180, 

:;160, 

:;H0, 

M20, 

$100, 

$80, 

S60, 

S40, 

$20, 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
$0 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



12,000 
11,000 
10,000 
9,000 
8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 



SUMMER PLAYGROUND 
ATTENDANCE 



11,250 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$200,000 

$180,000 

$160,000 

$140,000 

$120,000 

$100,000 - 

$80,000 

$60,000 

$40,000 

$20,000 

$0 



00^. 

looo 



LO 
Lfl 

d 
coo 
ro 

Ln 

d 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 



□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



r 


JULY 4TH & SUMMER 


CONCERT ATTENDANCE 


ft nnn 


550 






rC 


7,500 - 
7,000 - 
6,500 - 


— 










o 
r-. 


LD 
_ O r\i 
O ld 






lO 




VD * 1-1 


















6,000 - 
5,500 - 
5,000 - 




o 






















O ^ 

00 lo 




00 
— ^ 


LD 










4,500 - 




































- 


'f/UUU 


1 ' ' 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 


L 



81 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 



THE CHANGING FACE OF A GROWING COMMUNITY OF ELDERS 

The elder population continues to increase both nationally and locally. As "baby 
boomers" age, one out of three Andover residents will be over age 60 in the not too distant 
future. This single statistic is of primary importance. Will we, as a community, be ready? How 
prepared are we to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 60 to 100+? 
What resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in the 
community? As more residents seek information and assistance, either for themselves or for 
family members, the division will continue to create and provide specialized programs and 
services in fulfillment of its mission, as laid out by the Council on Aging, following the charge 
of the Town Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 

the community; 

Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 

community; and 

Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 

this Article (#35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health, nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and combat 
isolation. We continue to develop creative Intergenerational programs serving both elders and 
young people from pre-school to college age. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition 
programs provides a variety of opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve health. 
Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, educational and recreational 
programs, intergenerational opportunities, building the volunteer corps, and various 
administrative and elder network improvements. 

INCREASES IN NEED 

Requests for services tend to increase in difficult economic times. We have experienced 
an increase in requests for direct services, including Meals on Wheels, Medical Transportation, 
Friendly Visitors, Senior Connections and other supportive services. There has also been a 20% 
increase in applicants for "SCRPT", the senior property tax work off program. In addition, there 
has been a dramatic increase in requests for general information. We expect this trend to 
continue. As we have seen most recently at the federal level with changes in the Medicare 



82 



program and locally with fewer insurance providers and service options, the negative affects of 
the economy continue to impact the elderly population first, and often, most severely. 

ECONOMIC CONSTRAINTS 

An increased need for services is compounded by decreases in funding. As we struggle 
to maintain core services with fewer resources, we have increased efforts to offset related costs. 
Advocacy at the state and federal levels, grant writing and outside fundraising become 
increasingly important. Fees for service cover most program costs and are supplemented by 
coordinating programs with other agencies. 

SPACE 

Despite the defeat of funding for a new Senior Center, the Council on Aging Board and 
Senior Center staff continue to implement programs and services designed in response to 
identified needs. Many programs and activities are scheduled off-site because of inappropriate 
and insufficient space, causing seniors to limit their participation to one event a day so they 
won't have to travel between the Senior Center and another site. Others are unable to participate 
in events not scheduled at the Senior Center because accessibility to off-site locations is limited 
by the lack of affordable and accessible transportation services. 

OTHER 

The Council on Aging has identified advocacy, education and transportation as major 
areas of focus. T.R.I.A.D., a joint collaboration between the Senior Center, the Andover Police 
and Fire Departments, the Essex County Sheriffs Dept. and the District Attorney's office has 
been developed to address specific safety needs of Andover' s seniors and as well as to provide 
crime prevention educational materials. A vision research project conducted by the Center for 
Health and Disease Research at UMass/Lowell included approximately 30 seniors. The project 
looked at studying the effects of lutein and zeaxanthin in preventing age related macular 
degeneration, a common cause of vision loss in older adults. Preliminary findings were 
presented to program participants who may continue with some dietary modification to increase 
their intake of those antioxidants. Two new courses were added to our wellness programming; a 
pain management class was incorporated into our "Healthy Lifestyles" program, and, in a 
collaborative effort with a local women's fitness facility, we began offering a cardio conditioning 
class. "Outdoor Adventures For Women" was initiated to offer new programming for younger, 
active "boomers". Hiking, sailing and cross-country skiing are some of the anticipated activities. 



83 



ANDOVER YOUTH SERVICES 

Andover Youth Services aims to provide young people with useful experiences to promote 
healthy growth and development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe 
and challenging youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young 
adolescents and their families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social, and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. The AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the community 
service program, our after school adventure-based program, drop in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 24 
hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups, and specialized in- 
school groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative 
talents. The 5 l annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show, Shakespeare in the Park and numerous 
concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique entertainment 
opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services remained dedicated to establishing a community-wide 
network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Inc., Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources. Education, and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee, and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
take these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or creating plans for a new youth center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, the AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover in the new millennium. 



84 



AYS PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Summer Program - Rise Above - May to August 

The Summer of 2005 was another great adventure at Andover Youth Services. Through a 
series of fun and challenging activities, the young people who participated received a chance 
to express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, supporting environment. 
Over a thousand young people joined the AYS Summer Program and had the best time of 
their lives. The essence of the Summer Program was within the 8 weeks of our summer 
experience entitled, Rise Above. The program offered a wide variety of trips, adventures and 
services that attracted the interest of middle school students. The program encouraged young 
people to participate and experience activities that were new, diverse and challenging. The 
outdoor adventures (for example: rock climbing, backpacking, and kayaking) provide 
opportunities to teach about the value of natural resources in an exciting and fun manner. 

Ultimate Frisbee -Year round 

Young people indicated that they wanted Ultimate Frisbee and the AYS began the first 
middle school team in 2003. Based upon the success of the High School Ultimate Frisbee 
teams, the middle school boys and girls learned the multiple throws, offense and defense 
strategies, and other skills in this fast-paced sport. The team competed in a huge tournament 
in Amherst, MA and a couple of games against neighboring communities. 

Field Hockey 1 - Summer - Fall 

The AYS continued to expand a middle school girls field hockey team that competed against 
neighboring towns and brought high school students into a mentoring role by providing 
instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Volleyball - Winter 

The AYS continued its middle school volleyball league where students learned the necessary 

skills of passing, setting, serving, and hitting from high school mentors and coaches. Each of 

the three middle schools entered a separate boys and girls team for the end of the season 

tournament. 

Basketball, Open Gym - Year round 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a street hockey 
program, Open Gym and AYS High School Summer Basketball League became instant 
successes. Open gym provided a similar pick up atmosphere for high school basketball 
players. The AYS Summer Basketball League was designed and developed by a high school 
senior, Jake Minton, and brought over a hundred players and spectators down to the AHS 
Field House for biweekly games and a season-ending tournament. The programs will 
continue next summer and some beyond the summer months due to their success. 

Lacrosse - Year round 

Since 1997, the AYS has continued to expand the lacrosse program in Andover. The youth 
league experienced overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional youth teams were 
added for both girls and boys. The AYS implemented several summer lacrosse programs due 
to the overwhelming demand for year-round lacrosse programs. The Youth Services 



85 



produced successful beginners programs for youths ages 8-10 and pick up leagues for middle 
school boys and girls who wanted to improve upon their skills or learn the sport for the first 
time. In addition to expansion on the youth level, AYS funded and implemented a Girls 
lacrosse team into the high school in the spring of 2003 and a boys & girls freshmen team in 
the spring of 2004. Lacrosse has been a year-round effort offering clinics, introductory 
sessions, and pick up sessions. We continue to support this growing program by sustaining 
year-round fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and volunteers. 

Andover Snowboard Club - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share the love for the snow 
and travel to Sugarbush, Mt. Snow, Loon, Sunday River, Stratton for the US Open, and more 
for some stellar outdoor recreation. The ASC ventures north monthly and also collaborates 
with the Phillips Academy Snowboard Club. 

Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag football, Field Hockey, Learn to Snowboard, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, spring 
open gym, Ultimate frisbee, Rugby, Middle school Intramurals, Track program, volleyball 
program, Outing Club, Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - September to June 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during holidays and vacation days for middle 
school and high school students. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year round 

Community Service - The willingness of young people to serve their community was 
demonstrated thoroughly over the course of the community service days. The young people 
enthusiastically helped community trails by dragging huge logs and boards to build a bog 
bridge, clearing brush and dead trees to create a new trail, and hacking through brush to 
reclaim an overgrown trail. On another service day we helped out at the Franciscan Center, 
clearing brush and restoring a peace garden. The energy of the youth was focused in a 
manner that verified that young people can make a visible difference in their community. 

Venture Out Program - offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. 
We create a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ relationships. 
The young people are challenged mentally, physically, and socially. By participating in this 
group, the youth will develop vital self-confidence that will carry into every aspect of their 
lives and community. 

Drop in and flexible office hours 

Court-related services 

Volunteer and intern opportunities 

Hospital visits 

Referrals 

Employment network 



86 



College and Employment Recommendations 

Fundraising for youth programs 

Crisis intervention 

Outreach 

24-Hour emergency response 

Parent support and education 

Discussion groups 

Specialized in-school groups 

Transportation 

EVENTS 

Keep It Wild Fashion Show - December to June 

The 6 th Annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 50 models a 
venue to expose their creative talents. Student designers sewed outfits and recruited models 
who would showcase their work. The magnitude of the show required that the AHS Field 
House be transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing music and a 100- 
foot runway. 500 people turned out to this unique June event. 

Other Events 

Shakespeare in the Park 
Making Connections 
Check it Out - Police Forum 
Service Club annual event 

Concerts/Shows - Year round 

AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on concerts, 
dances, and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average we produce 
one to two shows per month. Examples in 2005; Piebald Concert, Turkey Jam, Hypnotude, 
several OTH shows, etc. 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK- May to December 

The Andover Community Skate Park is a positive and safe environment open to all ages and 
abilities, which promotes and encourages individual expression, and learning. The park 
provides a positive atmosphere centered around respect for others and most importantly, fun. 

The Skate Park continued to play an influential role at the AYS. Aside from normal hours of 
operation, many young people had the opportunity to participate in skateboarding lessons and 
clinics. High school mentors instructed youth on the various skateboarding tricks and ramp 
riding techniques. The ACSP hosted two professional skateboard demonstrations over the 
summer months bringing in some 400 spectators each demo. Skateboard competitions 
allowed local youth to showcase their honed skills and win some prizes at the same time. 
The Andover Community Skate Park remains an extremely positive asset to the community. 



87 



NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups, and systems already working with young 
people. Andover Youth Services is dedicated establishing a community-wide network of 
supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following organizations, 
creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for youth. Each of 
the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and outreach to those young 
people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover. 

Andover Youth Council 

AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. The council is comprised of 
thirteen high school students and three adult members chosen from the community at large. 
The mission of the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth, to bring more services 
pertaining to issues relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower young people in the 
community by getting them involved with community organizations, schools, town 
government, in order to create opportunities for youth. The council has become an official 
part of the Town structure and their office is located in the Town Offices next to the Youth 
Services office. 

Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a youth center for the 
youth of Andover. 

Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency, and 
increasing a sense of belonging in the community of Andover. 

AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities and their 
goal is to be a community which is comfortable, inviting, and accessible for people of any 
age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. 

Outivard Bound, Girls Coalition, )\ est Middle School P AC 

ADMINISTRATION 

Hiring, supervising, and training seasonal, part-time staff, and volunteers. 

YOUTH SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued to replace middle school sports programs that were previously cut from school 
budgets including: 



88 



~ Track - The 3 rd annual middle school track season introduced young athletes to the 
various track and field events with current AHS track stars as their mentors. There were 
five meets including the season finale, the MVC Middle School Invitational. Over 70 
kids from grades 5-8 participated in this spring program. 

~ Wrestling - AYS brought the return of wrestling to Andover in grand fashion with a 
turnout of over 50 boys in its first week. The idea was generated from the kids and the 
AYS helped bring it to reality by securing practice space and a mat, getting coaches, and 
coordinating the effort. The team had its first meet and 1 7 out of 23 wrestlers took home 
medals. 

~ Golf - Another request from kids and parents that was brought to life in true AYS 
fashion. After a tryout of 60+ kids, teams of 12 were formed for each middle school and 
each week featured a practice with local golf pros and a match between intra-town rivals. 
The league focused on teaching the kids the proper golf skills and etiquette that lead to 
success on the course. 

~ Other middle school leagues run by AYS: Field Hockey, Ultimate Frisbee (high school 
and middle school), Lacrosse and Volleyball. 

Created quality programs in four areas: recreation, social, support and education. We 
served over 7,000 participants over the course of 2005. 

AYS provided a variety of service and outreach to young people and their families. 
Empowering young people to making their ideas a reality, listening to concerns and issues, 
college recommendations, referrals, non-traditional office hours, advocacy, collaboration 
with community groups and a variety of other services provide young people with the help or 
connection they need. 

Continued progress in the planning, development and fundraising for the Youth Center. 
Raised over $2.5 million for the Youth Center, including Andover' s third live Telethon that 
netted some $85,000 in donations from the community. 

AYS continued to serve the community with dedicated involvement in service projects and 
community events like: The Community Read-A-Long, Read Across America, and the 
Service Club's Annual Cookout in the Park. 

Repeated the success of previous Summer programs in 2005 with another year of huge 
numbers. The AYS Summer Program maintained a diverse offering of clinics, trips and 
activities for young people in middle school and high school. All trips were filled to capacity 
and feedback was resoundingly positive. The AYS Summer Program is unique in the state 
and country in its program content, participation, operating staff and overwhelming success. 



89 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover's 2,500 veterans and their families. In 2005, the Office 
responded to inquiries or requests from over 800 local veterans and provided direct financial 
assistance for fuel, food, housing, burials and medical needs to several dozen Andover families. The 
Town annually receives reimbursement from the Commonwealth for 75% of the funds provided to 
local veterans under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic observances in observance of Veterans 
Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, the anniversary of September 1 1 th and placed over 6,800 flags on the 
graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were 
also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

Formal ceremonies were held on Memorial Day, Flag Day, July 4 th , V-J Day, POW/MIA 
Day, Veterans Day and Pearl Harbor Day. 

Some highlights of 2005 include the preparation and design of Andover's proposed new 
Vietnam Veterans' and Korean War Memorials. The monuments will be paid entirely from private 
funds. The office was active in the local coordination of the new Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Afghanistan/Iraq bonus program which pays service members deployed to combat zones a $1,000 
bonus and those called to active duty outside combat zones $500. Record upgrading continued to be 
a priority in the office as was obtaining Federal benefits for local veterans. VA statistics are 
substantially behind, however, Andover residents receive approximately $2,000 in tax-free Federal 
veterans benefit dollars annually. 

The Veterans Services Office Director also serves as the Town's Graves Registration and 
Burial Officer. During 2005, ninety-two Andover veterans died - fifty-six were World War II 
veterans, twenty-one were Korean War veterans, fifteen were Vietnam veterans and one was a 
veteran of Afghanistan. Several of these veterans fought in more than one war. 

Finally, a special project to upgrade all Andover records from the Civil War was begun with 
completion scheduled for late 2005. 



90 



ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS - 2005* 



1) MOONEY, Francis J. 

2) BARCH, Daniel H. 

3) D'URSO, Nicholas G. 

4) DIAMANTAS, Harry N. 

5) MOSS, George M. 

6) SCHOFIELD, Arnold E. 

7) JOHNSON, Robert H. 

8) LABRECQUE, Aime 

9) HARRIS, George R. 

10) BUSBY, Philip A. 

11) GARDNER, Wallace H. 

12) CRONKHITE, Bayard M. 

13) NESS, Harold B. 
14)HAUGH,ThomasJ. 

15) HARDY, John F. 

16) KORAVOS, Thomas L. 

17) BRODERICK, John F. 

18) MULLER, WALTER 

19) WOOD III, William M. 



Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Peacetime 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


Vietnam 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 
USAF 


WWII 

SS & BS w/V 
WWII 


USMC 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


WWII 



91 



20) RICHARDSON, Henry V. 

21) VIEWEG, Frederick R. 

22) POWELL, Robert B. 

23) MUGLER, Milton W. 

24) McADAMS, Gordon 

25) PROCTOR, Robert H. 

26) NORTON, Howard P. 

27) CONSOLI, Domenic L. 

28) DiGIOVANNI, Rosario 

29) SKINNER, Herbert A. 

30) THIRAS, Stephen 

31) MARTIN, Jr., Frederick 

32) MATTHESON, Wendell 

33) FISK, Robert G. 

34) FULLER, Raymond E. 

35) BROUILLARD, Joseph E. 

36) HASELTINE, Irving D. 

37) DIMLICH, Benjamin F. 

38) GEARY, George H. 

39) DeMUYSERE, Joseph A. 



Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Royal Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


USAF 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


USAF 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 



92 



40) PETERS, George N. 

41) BOWMAN, Charles 

42) WOJTKUN, Joseph M. 

43) PIERCY, Robert 

44) KRISTENSEN, Erik 

45) DELANEY, Clarence S. 

46) DRISCOLL, James M. 

47) McCLELLAN, James T. 

48) RINGLAND, John J. 

49) McCAFFERTY, George J. 

50) STANSFIELD, Ernest 

51) MANNING, Ralph 

52) SHALHOUB, Ralph J. 

53) JONES, Jr., John W. 

54) DeQUATTRO, Joseph W. 

55) GRAHAM, Frederick J. 

56) MCLAUGHLIN, Patrick J. 

57) PHIEFFER, James J. 

58) LITTLE, Jack Bryan 

59) WEINER, Arnold 



Navy 


Korea 


Army 


Vietnam 


USAF 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Afghanistan 


Army 


WWII 


USCG 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


USAF 




Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


Korea 


USMC 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWH 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 



93 



60) KEEGAN, Harold O. 

61) MARNIE, James D. 

62) MAROTTA, George J. 

63) SUMNER, Earl J. 

64) GAFFNEY, Warren 

65) CAVALLARO, Anthony 

66) CHAPELL, Richard E. 

67) BENSON, Richard F. 

68) BEAN, Curtis 

69) MARKEY, William L. 

70) WALDIE, Alexander 

71) MURPHY, John J. 

72) DOYLE, William A. 

73) ROBINSON, John F. 

74) FRANCIS, John H. F. 

75) DeLEO, Lawrence A. 

76) CONRAD, Richard H. 

77) CONNOLLY, Robert C. 

78) LARGE, Richard 

79) ECCLES, Frank 



Army 


Korea 


Royal Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


USAF 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


Vietnam 


USAF 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 



94 



80) WALDIE, Alexander R. 

81) OZOONIAN, Robert B. 

82) HAMBLET, Theodore C. 

83) FINE, Peter A. 

84) MERTZ, Nicholas L. 

85) ROSE, John N. 

86) McKEE, Peter Q. 

87) LOPEZ, Anthony A. 

88) WRIGHT, John W. 

89) SOHIGIAN, Vartkes 

90) RAPISARDI, Augustin J. 

91) EVANS, Harold F. 

92) KENNEY, E. Roy 



Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


AAC 


WWII 


USMC 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


USAF 


WWII 




Korea 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 



* Andover Veterans Director John Doherty compiled the above list. It is accurate to the best of his 
knowledge. Please report errors or omissions to Mr. Doherty at (978) 623-8218. 



95 



^asasss^ 




ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA01810 

(978)623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Debra Rahmin Silberstein, Chair 
Anthony H. James, Ph.D., Secretary 
Arthur H. Barber, Ed.D. 
Richard J. Collins 
David S. Samuels, DMD 



Claudia L. Bach, Ed.D 

Superintendent of Schools 
cbach@apsl.net 



ANNUAL REPORT 

2005 
Andover School Department 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, 
is to provide students with the knowledge, skill, and qualities 
required to be successful in a diverse society. 

In 2005 the School Department began modest restoration of programs and services that had been reduced or 
eliminated in recent years due to budget cutbacks. In Spring, 2005 the School Committee allocated $375,000 to 
bring back the Health Education teachers and Reading Specialists for elementary students; a Librarian and 
Health, Technology, and Music teachers for middle school students; and coaching and administrative support for 
high school students. 1 This achievement was particularly noteworthy given the economic challenges of rising 
health, utility, and out-of-district SPED costs, and declining state aid. The rebuilding funds were not sufficient to 
restore all programs nor to discontinue fees, and so we continued to charge for bus transportation for 7 th through 
12 th graders, athletics, all-day kindergarten, after school activities, and parking spaces at the high school. 

Despite substantial financial constraints since 2003 we have managed to preserve our core curricular and athletic 
programs. 2 As a result our students excelled in these areas, and Andover Schools received the following 
prestigious awards: 

• 2005 Vanguard Model Award , presented to Andover High School by Mass Insight (AHS was one of 11 
schools in Massachusetts to receive this award) 

• Commonwealth Compass School Award presented to Andover High School by the Department of 
Education to recognize school improvement and encourage sharing of exemplary practices (AHS was one 
of 12 schools to receive this award) 

• Outperformer designation by Standard & Poors to Andover Public Schools 

• Gold Medal Designation by Expansion Management Magazine to Andover Public Schools 

• Ernest Dalton Memorial Award presented by the Boston Globe for overall athletic excellence in high 
school athletics for division 1 schools 

Given economic realities, the FY06 Budget (with the exception of the small restoration plan outlined above), was a 
level service budget. As a result, staff and parents voiced concerns during the 5 budget input sessions we hosted 
in fall 2005 that our students were not receiving the education they need to prepare them for life after graduation, 

Enrollment in our six elementary schools increased slightly from 2,793 in 2004 to 2,810 in 2005. The middle 
schools saw a small decline, but at West Middle enrollment actually increased by 17 students. The high school 



Many programs and services are still not restored. 



As we state in the Executive Summary of the 2007 Budget, "Four years ago, when we made substantial reductions, the Principals 
and I were determined to preserve core programs, and maintain class size at the elementary level. To keep our core programs, our 
high school class sizes increased and we decreased programs at all levels in physical education, health, reading, music, and guidance. 
We also eliminated administrative positions. As a result, our syste^ias remained strong in the core academic areas, and our students, 
with a skilled staff and supportive parents, have excelled on standardized tests, in their core subjects, and in athletics." 



experienced the most significant increase, from 2004 to 2005 going from 1,751 to 1,784. Over the past 8 years 
high school enrollment has increased by 380 students. Due to the enrollment increase at the high school and to 
increasing space needs at all our schools, in fall 2005 we commissioned NESDEC 3 to do a space needs and 
enrollment projection study. Results of the study will be available in spring 2006. 

With the retirement last year of several administrators, we began the school year with 8 new administrators. 
They are: at Wood Hill Middle School, Patrick Bucco, Principal and Bill Fleischmann, Assistant Principal; at 
Doherty, Bruce Maki, Principal, Theresa McGuinness Assistant Principal; and Kate Clark, SPED Program 
Advisor; and at West Middle, Steve Murray, Assistant Principal and Deborah Downes, SPED Program Advisor. 
In order to prepare for increasing administrative shortages, we brought together surrounding districts to develop 
for our area the Salem State T.I.L.E. program. 4 T.I.L.E. classes began in 2006 at Wood Hill Middle School for 
the first cohort of 15 aspiring administrators. We also embarked upon an aggressive recruitment and retention 
program for both teachers and administrators, and will join several other districts in organizing our 2 nd annual 
Merrimack Valley Recruitment Fair. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND CENTRAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

The five elected members of the School Committee typically met twice monthly during the year. Dr. Tony James 
stepped down as Chair of the Committee, replaced by Attorney Debra Silberstein. Mr. Dick Collins was re- 
elected secretary. Dr. David Samuels was elected to replace Mr. Chris Smith. Dr. Arthur Barber continued on 
into his third year. During the summer, the School Committee completed its evaluation of the superintendent and 
approved the Goals and Objectives for the 2005-2006 school year. The goals are: 

• Goal: Student Achievement 

We will maintain programs and practices that ensure that all students meet clearly defined high 
standards that result in on-going improved performance, and where needed, we will design, develop, 
implement, and evaluate new programs and practices. 

• Goal: Educator Quality 

We will attract and retain well-trained highly motivated teachers and administrators who are committed 
to enhancing student achievement and to lifelong professional development. 

• Goal: Finances/Budget 

We will engage in an inclusive open budget process that is driven by need to ensure student achievement 
while maximizing the use of taxpayers' dollars. 

• Communications and Action Planning 

We will create a dynamic and comprehensive plan, which ensures collaboration and partnership among 
the Andover Public Schools, Town government, and the Andover community. 

The School Committee held work sessions during the summer 2005 to discuss and plan the budget, continue 
collective bargaining and develop communications initiatives. The employee contracts for all district unions 
expired in Summer 2004. Contract negotiations between the School Committee and the Andover Education 
Association were completed in 2005, followed within the year by the other school department bargaining units. 
All school department units agreed to a wage increase of 7.85% over three years (FY05 - FY07) and to a co-pay 
increase for doctor's visits from $5 to $15 and for emergency hospital visits from $25 to $75. 

Assistant Superintendent - Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Professional Development - new 
The administration, teachers, and staff worked diligently to provide more learning opportunities to more students 
through the dedicated review and revision of curricula programs and instructional practice. Leadership in 
curriculum review included participation by the five content area Curriculum Councils, the Principals, the 
building level curriculum leaders and teacher leaders in all disciplines. Through the work of these groups in 
concert with the teaching staff, recommendations came forward for program revisions and textbook adoptions in 
the amount of $255,000 for funding purchases of materials in mathematics, science, English/language arts, social 
studies, and foreign language. Focus on such program development as the Elementary Balanced Literacy Model, 
Middle School Engineering/Technology Program and Expeditionary Learning Model, and the High School 
Integrated Math Program provided exciting samples of the continuous programmatic improvement for student 
learning. 

Administrators and faculty participated in the model of building professional learning communities, a vision and 
model of continuous improvement and learning for both adults and children. The professional development for 
the leadership team begins each year in the summer Administrative Retreat and provides leadership direction 

3 New England School Development Council 97 

4 Teacher Initiative for Leadership in Education Program 



and solidarity for the team. Continued exploration of building great organizations, setting high standards, and 
providing the support to reach those standards is emphasized. Through a vigorous professional development 
program, over fifty-four courses were offered to teachers at all levels. With enhanced pedagogy and deepened 
content knowledge, teachers and administrators brought informed and enlightened thinking to inform learning in 
the classroom. Components of the federal No Child Left Behind Act requiring teachers to meet the standard of 
"highly qualified" as well as state requirements regarding licensure and recertification have motivated teachers 
and administrators to subscribe to the many offerings made available to them through these professional 
development courses. 

Andover students participated in local, state, and national assessments as demonstrations of their learning. 
Students in grades one through eleven participated in local assessments to evaluate their learning in mathematics 
and English/language arts. The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) was administered to 
students in grades three through eight and grade ten with increasing testing in science and social studies. 
Andover students continue to demonstrate a solid performance. Without exception, all students in the class of 
2004 passed the MCAS test, which is mandatory for graduating students. Additionally all of our schools have 
achieved "Adequate Yearly Progress" as a benchmark for achieving proficiency for all students by the year 2014 
as required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act. 

Business Office 

The primary responsibility of the Business Office is managing financial operations and selected support services. 
This includes developing the annual budget, processing payables, payroll, labor contract financial compliance, 
purchasing, fee collection, financial reporting, development of the Capital Improvement Plan and grant 
management. The Business Office, which includes the Copy Center, works with the entire school system and 
many Town Departments. In addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities 
management (in cooperation with the Plant and Facilities Department), student transportation, school and 
district emergency management, custodial services and food service. In 2005 Evan Katz was appointed as 
Business Administrator, replacing Bernie Tuttle. 

Human Resources Office 

The Human Resources Department is a shared resource for all town and school employees, now numbering 
around 1,300. It oversees and directs many facets of town and school recruitment, hiring, training, benefits 
administration and employee and labor relations. Karla Kohl, a software specialist with Human Resources 
expertise, joined the team. As a result of her technological expertise, the Human Resource staff began in earnest 
to manage and develop many features of the MUNIS software program. They are working on several projects. 
Over the next year these advances, including a user friendly "HR" website, will make data more available to 
assist managers, employees, and applicants in their search for information. 

The Human Resource team has continued to work with other communities in the Merrimack Valley Educators' 
Consortium and Andover is participating in a second annual job fair. Last years' fair attracted over 700 
candidates. Working with Northern Essex Community College, the Town's independent employee association 
and the Human Resource department provided 15 Town employees with a 3-credit computer applications class. 
This program was so successful and affordable that we look forward to a long term working relationship with 
Northern Essex. Above all else, this was the year of concluding contract negotiations. The team provided 
assistance and worked with both school and town officials to conclude these negotiations. 

SCHOOL REPORTS: 

Andover High School 
Foreign Language Department 

The State and Federal government declared the Year 2005 the "Year of Languages" in order to bring to the 
forefront the need to increase the awareness and importance of Foreign Language study. The Foreign Language 
Department organized a series of events to celebrate and diffuse this message. Dr. Bach and Dr. O'Neil 
interviewed teachers and students for Dr. Bach's cable video program, the Andover Experience. In further 
community outreach, high school students visited fifth grade classes at all five elementary schools to present mini- 
lessons in French, Spanish, and Latin to expose the elementary students to the sounds, culture, and joy of learning 
another language. The Curriculum Council dedicated time to looking towards the future of Foreign Language 
instruction. This has included investigating a change to the current sixth grade exploratory program and the 
introduction of Foreign Language at the elementary level. We have also been considering the possibility of 
adding a non-European language at the high school level, most likely Chinese in order to meet the changing 
political and economic reality. 

98 



Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department implemented a new challenging four-course or five-course sequence that prepares 
students for Calculus. In each course the students study the concepts of Algebra, Geometry, Probability and 
Statistics using an integrated approach. This program was created by funding from the National Science 
Foundation and is aligned with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards for School 
Mathematics. In this sequence of courses students study the concepts of Algebra, Geometry, Probability and 
Statistics using an integrated approach. Students enrolled in this program must complete the four-course 
sequence and may not transition into the Geometry, Algebra, and Precalculus sequence. 

Science Department 

The Science Department implemented a new challenging three-course sequence for level 2 and 3 students that 
cover the topics of 9 th grade ecology/earth science and 10 ,b grade biology at a more deliberate pace. Students 
enrolled in this program must complete the entire sequence that will prepare them for additional credits in 
physical science and chemistry during their junior year. In each course, the students study the concepts related to 
life sciences. This program was designed to meet the life sciences learning standards as outlined by the 
Massachusetts Frameworks in Science and Technology that are then tested as part of the Biology Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System that is administered during sophomore year. The courses include the 
following: Life Science 1: Evolution, Biodiversity and Ecology; Life Science 2: Cells and Genetics; Life Science 3: 
Anatomy and Physiology. Also available next year will be electives in Earth Science, Astronomy, and Geology. 

Social Studies Department 

Guided by K-12 Curriculum Council decisions, the Social Studies Department revised its foundation benchmarks 
(in line with the revised Massachusetts State Frameworks) in both the grade 9 World Civilization and grade 10 
U.S History courses. The curriculum work for these foundation courses was refined instructional!) through 
summer and school year professional development. Staff development courses and workshops this year have also 
included elective courses and interdisciplinary work. In the fall of 2005, twenty-three teachers from the Andover 
Public Schools, in conjunction with the Andover Historical Society, participated in a course entitled "Andover 
Through the Ages." The Society's director Julie Mofford, and Social Studies teacher Mary Robb from Andover 
High School's Social Studies Department collaborated in creating this course. Guest lecturers presented primary 
source documents on a variety of cultural and historical topics related to Andover; these were then incorporated 
into the curriculum. Three Social Studies teachers are currently taking the Andover Lesson Study professional 
development course, designed to foster collaborative reflection and improved instruction. Inclusion of Special 
Education teachers in this program is one example of the department's efforts to work more closely and 
effectively with Special Education colleagues. 

English Department 

Based on our K-12 Curriculum Council, on data analysis of MCAS results, and on revised SAT requirements, the 
English Department continued to revise its curriculum, course offerings, and instructional practices. Central to 
that change was a revised grade 9 foundations curriculum with a new text for language, grammar and writing. In 
addition, supported by summer professional development work on instructional practice, the department 
bolstered its teaching of classic (non-contemporary) literature with the addition of A Tale of Two Cities. 
Professional Development workshops in the essay, poetry and figurative language also continued in the 
department. In addition, the department worked to improve cross-curricular instruction, particularly in writing. 
Several English teachers are currently taking the Andover Lesson Study professional development course, 
designed to foster collaborative reflection and improved instruction. Again, we have had no senior failures in 
MCAS, a clear indication of our program's success, particularly with our targeted interventions, which are 
supported by both local funds and state grants. Andover High School's newspaper, The Fence, launched its first 
town-wide distribution; the newspaper is produced through an interdisciplinary (English and Applied 
Technology) journalism course. Finally, The Merrimack Literary Review received in the last year The 
Independent Publishers Book Award, along with awards from the Frost Foundation Award and Writer's Digest. 

Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department was pleased to welcome Kyra Bateman to the AHS Counseling Team. The 
Counseling Department continues to update and integrate technology into the department. TCCi Family 
Connection by Naviance continues to be the most current technological resource available in college planning. 
This comprehensive website assists students and parents in the process of making decisions about colleges and 
careers. Further, in September 2005 the Counseling Department launched their new website to facilitate 
communication between the department and the parent community. This year 48% of the seniors (220 students) 
applied to colleges under the early decision/early action admission deadlines. As of February 1 st , 2505 transcript 
requests have been processed of which approximately 2000 were complete by December 15 ,b . Early admission 
results were encouraging and included acceptances from Boston College, Boston University, Brown University, 



Columbia University, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University, New York University, Northeastern 
University, Suffolk University, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Tufts University and Yale. The Peer 
Leaders initiative is well underway with 32 students trained as Peer Leaders by the Anti-Defamation League, 
using World of Difference curriculum for six faculty and all the 32 students involved in the program. The 
"Choice Not Chance" College Planning Program for parents was off to a great start, with counselors Peggy Cain 
and Alicia Linsey discussing trends in admission counseling to over three hundred parents. The Counselors 
kicked off the College Counseling Series with juniors with a College Admission Panel with representatives from 
Bentley College, Clark Univeristy, Dean College, Northeastern University, Tufts University and UMASS 
Amherst. 

Doherty Middle School 

The year 2005 was significant in the history of Doherty Middle School. Long standing principal, Floyd McManus 
announced his retirement, and in the spring of 2005 the assistant principal, Bruce Maki was appointed to the 
position of principal. This, in turn necessitated the hiring of a new assistant principal, Theresa McGuiness. In 
addition, Kate Clark was hired replacing the previous program head for special education. Along with several 
other newly hired teachers, the new administrative team gave Doherty a slightly different appearance in the fall 
of 2005. The addition of these highly qualified educators enabled Doherty Middle School to continue its 
commitment to the team concept and the over-all middle school philosophy that has been part of the Andover 
Public Schools since 1988. Due to the efforts of the Doherty School Improvement Council, the Superintendent of 
Schools and the Andover School Committee, Doherty was in a position to reinstate the positions of school 
librarian and health teacher. This put Doherty Middle School in a better position to serve both its students and 
parents. 

West Middle School 

West Middle School began the year with a School Improvement Plan that focused on school climate (issues 
related to bullying) and students' skills in responding to MCAS open response questions. The teachers worked 
diligently to coordinate their instructional efforts, and they brought these coordinated efforts into the classroom. 
The School Improvement Council also oversaw the administration of a bullying survey to all students and faculty, 
and a significant percentage of our parents responded. The new school year began with two new members of the 
administrative team: Assistant Principal Steve Murray and Special Education Program Head Deborah Downes. 
September also inaugurated the Engineering Technology Program, which gives students hands-on learning 
experiences related to science and math concepts. Responding to the Katrina hurricane tragedy, West Middle 
School students, faculty and parents participated in various fund-raisers and collection drives, including the 
"Katrina 1-K" and a collection of over 3000 books to replenish Gulf Coast libraries. In addition, under the 
guidance of our PAC executive board, West Middle School began a partnership with Gretna Middle School in 
Gretna, Louisiana. WMS parents also responded with great enthusiasm to a change in school traffic patterns for 
morning drop-off and after-school dismissals. By rerouting parent traffic and bus locations, the school has made 
the early mornings and afternoons safer for students. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

Although Wood Hill Middle School is only in its fourth year of existence, we already have been on a roller 
coaster. We started out with most of the positions in place to implement a middle school model and then we had 
numerous positions cut. This last year, we were able to bring Music back, for which we were grateful and more 
optimistic toward putting in place the staffing configuration and resource provision deemed necessary for 
implementing a true middle school concept. The vehicle to lead us in achieving our goals is Expeditionary 
Learning, which is a model for comprehensive school reform that emphasizes high achievement through active 
learning, character growth, and teamwork. We strongly believe that teacher effectiveness is the single most 
powerful predictor of student progress and Expeditionary Learning's professional development will lead us into 
student success for all. The support for this program has grown with numerous community organizations and 
citizens contributing financially. As we move forward, Wood Hill continued to strive towards being a school not 
just asking the questions, but finding the answers. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

Our school atmosphere is such that all students are called upon to be trustworthy, kind, honest and fair. We 
work with students to be respectful of oneself, of property and of all school community members. To help 
promote these ideals we implemented an anti-bullying program known as S.T.O.P. (Stop Teasing Other People). 
The development of this program began over a year ago when a team of parents, teachers and other community 
agencies came together to help students make connections to reduce teasing and bullying. Therefore, the 
Bancroft School S.T.O.P. program each month begins with a general assembly to discuss a monthly theme 
(respect, tolerance, empathy, etc.) and is followed by lessons and literacy activities throughout the month that 
connects with that theme. The centerpiece of the program, is "Friday Bancroft Family Time." During this time 



teachers and students from different grades gather together in small groups to help cultivate relationships across 
the different grade levels. Our other initiatives from previous years also help to meet our goal of developing pro- 
social behavior. One such program is A.J.A.S. (Alliance of Juniors And Seniors). This program partners senior 
citizens from the community with students from our school in a mentor-mentee relationship. Because of the 
success of this program we have also implemented "BRIDGES" which is a powerful intergenerational program 
that brings fourth-graders and senior citizens together as a community of learners. In this program students get 
to know, learn about, and have fun with older people in our town as they work through a series of lessons on the 
aging process. 

High Plain Elementary School 

High Plain Elementary School's commitment to environmental science and core values inspired its annual theme 

for 2005: 

"Fly High - Take the H.A.W.K. Challenge!" 

H - Help Others 

A - Aim High to Achieve 

W - Work Hard 

K - Know the Kindness Counts 
The ELF (Environmental Learning for the Future) Program entered its second year. Over 90 parent volunteers 
participated in extensive training programs to facilitate four hands-on science exploration projects in every K-5 
classroom. Agilent Technology expanded its physical science enrichment workshops to 4 th and 5 th graders. 
Instructional efforts were focused on mathematics. Noted author, Greg Tang, provided professional development 
and parent outreach workshops "Math Backpacks" were created to send home age-appropriate math games for 
skill practice and family fun. High Plain teachers continued to implement Balanced Literacy. Guided Reading, 
grammar, word study, John Collins Writing Across the Curriculum and literature study are key elements of this 
training initiative. Over 400 new titles were added to the leveled book collection to support this instruction. High 
Plain and the Wood Hill Community continued to share cross-age teaching and mentoring activities. Our Study 
Buddies, Reading Partners, "Fun Fair" and Field Day programs built a valuable bridge and partnership between 
our schools. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Parents, teachers and students have universally praised the decision to return the health teacher and curriculum 
to our classrooms. An added benefit has been the restoration of the Reading Teacher and Learning Specialist to 
full time status in their designated roles. Our ability to deliver small group instruction to our most needy 
beginning readers has doubled. Our ability to modify the regular education curriculum has also been greatly 
enhanced. The Sanborn PTO has raised approximately $35,000 per year to fund our curriculum enrichment 
projects and to supplement our reduced operating budgets to enable us to continue to provide high quality 
educational programs for our students. A major fundraising effort was completed last spring to support our 
efforts to upgrade our library collection, refurbish our stage and cafetorium, upgrade our gymnasium and 
supplement our integrated arts programs. On behalf of our present and future students, I want to thank the 
citizens of Andover, our town and school employees, our loyal cadre of volunteers and our many private 
benefactors for your continued support. 

Shawsheen Primary School 

The school wide theme at Shawsheen (Preschool through Grade 2) this year was the Ocean, which has been 
integrated throughout the curriculum. We were fortunate to have many volunteers/grandparents come in to 
share their knowledge of ocean and sea creatures. All first and second graders traveled to the New England 
Aquarium in November, and the PTO sponsored many cultural activities at the school related to this theme, 
curriculum units and our overarching theme The Golden Rule. During our weekly all-school assemblies this year, 
we focused on literacy through music and movement. We also are in the process of becoming more involved with 
senior citizens from Marland Place. Capital Improvements included the painting and installing new floors in 
three classrooms, new windows and ADA compliant handles for all fire doors. The Shawsheen Community is 
learning and thriving. 

South School 

Respect, Responsibility, and Kindness were the guiding core values for South Elementary in 2005. We continued 
this year with our theme "South Unlocks the Keys To Learning Success." Once again, we recognized the 
tremendous contributions of our PTO, staff members, Andona, Wyeth, Bank of New York, and other business 
partners to make the South student learning opportunities successful. The faculty completed the discussion of 
"Professional Learning Communities" and developed grade level and specialist SMART goals. The students in 
grades 3, 4, 5 continued to perform high on the MCAS and internal Andover assessments. South continued being 
a high performing school in all areas of MCAS. OvlePa41 in the state MCAS, South placed 23 out of 1,003 



elementary schools with the third grade placing 6 >b in the state. Although each year South has achieved in the top 
tier of elementary schools, we have continued to set goals for improvement. Our Improvement Council members 
had discussions centered on safety, class size, professional development, student achievement, and the operating 
budget. In a time when the budget has been significantly cut, the tremendous effort and commitment of our 
parent community are commendable. The following were some of the highlights of our school year: 

• A strong supportive culture that values the South traditions 

• The continued integration of technology 

• A highly involved student government program 

• Professional development based on the Professional Learning Community model 

• The implementation of a schoolwide balanced literacy program 

• Utilization of the cultural resources of Boston and Andover to supplement and enhance students' 
lives. 

West Elementary School 

West Elementary School students once again engaged in a number of academic and community-wide activities 
that extended beyond the regular curriculum and the school day. Our March of Dimes Jump Rope for Heart 
event raised more than $4,500, again making West Elementary one of the better fundraisers among the New 
England Affiliate participants. The Easter Seals Shoot Out again raised more than $3,000 for that worthy cause. 
West Elementary School's Math Olympiad teams continued to do well by once again placing in the top ten 
percent of all participating schools, including those who have sixth grade team members. WERAWC, West 
Elementary Readers and Writers Conference, held in March, featured writers, performers, and artists, Cockburn 
& Steinbergh, James Gelsey, Giles LaRoche, Doreen Rappaport, and Charles Smith. The student council 
collected goods for the People's Pantry and The Community Day Care Program in Lawrence. West Elementary 
also has a council sponsored school store that raises money for student activities, a Before-School Enrichment 
Program, Grade 4/5 Chorus, Grade 3 Chorus, Chess Club, Destination Imagination, Wyeth Institute Science 
Enrichment program. Johns Hopkins Talent Search and Buddies-Upper grade classes paired with primary 
classes. The final phase of the West Elementary Asbestos Abatement Project was completed. New floor tiles, new 
ceiling tiles, new heating vents, and all new lighting was installed in the grade five wing. Additional work was 
completed on the first grade wing of classrooms. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT DEPARTMENTS: 

Pupil Personnel Department 

The Pupil Personnel Administration continued to oversee the provision of special education services to 
approximately 1,000 identified students, between the ages of 3 and 22. Programs were available to address the 
needs of students with mild to moderate learning disabilities as well as those with more severe, multiple 
handicaps. To the extent possible, special education students attended their neighborhood school and 
participated with their typically developing peers in the general education setting. The Department continued its 
commitment to returning students to the district from out-of-district programs and providing consultation, 
training and support to in-district staff so that outside placements could be avoided whenever possible. One 
important aspect of this work was the establishment of a collaborative relationship with Melmark New England, 
a school for autistic children and those with severe behavioral challenges. Melmark consultants now visit our 
schools regularly to assist in behavioral planning. When their program eventually moves to Andover, we 
anticipate that this partnership will continue to grow in a mutually beneficial manner. Another area that was 
strengthened this past year was nursing services. The LPN position at Wood Hill Middle School was changed to 
an RN position in order to bring Wood Hill in line with the other middle schools. Middle school RN's are 
considered important members of the professional team in responding to the needs of young adolescents, both 
their medical and social/emotional needs. In addition, the Head Nurse position became a Director of Nursing 
Services. As the schools increasingly respond to children with complex and potentially acute medical conditions, 
the addition of a professional level administrator to oversee nursing care in the district helps improve the 
students' overall safety. Collaboration with Melmark and improved nursing services are two examples of the 
work in the Pupil Personnel Department to improve the capacity of the Andover Public Schools to be responsive 
to the needs of an increasingly diverse student population. 

Health Education Department 

The Andover Health Education Department supports, delivers, and evaluates a coordinated health education 
program for all students. This year health educational professionals aligned the curriculum with the 
Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework recommended by The Massachusetts Board of Education. Five 
health teachers were returned to our elementary schools to build positive self-concepts and decision-making 
techniques in our children at an early age. Secondary students were given accurate, current health knowledge so 
that they might achieve their highest potential for well Ippjtig. The Department of Health Education administered 



the Center for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey to high school students. Behaviors related to tobacco, 
alcohol and illegal drug use, sexuality, diet, exercise, violence, and mental health issues were reported. 
Community network teams such as Andover's Community Health Advisory Team met to build safe schools and 
community. G.U.T.S. (Growing Up Taking A Stand), and G.L.A.M. (Girls, Leaders, Advocates & Mentors) 
membership at Andover High taught students to take an active role as models for positive health decisions. Peer 
Leaders at Andover High increased support for students' addressing problems relating to dating violence, family 
situations, eating disorders, and addictive behaviors. S.A.D.D. increased awareness of alcohol and drug misuse. 
The Parent-to-Parent Speaker Series established a program of speakers that directly tied curriculum initiatives to 
parent awareness. Speakers introduced parents to topics such as resiliency, stress, and resolution of conflicts. 
Anthony Wolf spoke on "Raising Responsible Teenagers," Rick Irving on "Bullying-How It Happens and How To 
Help" and Lani Peterson on "It Takes A Village." 

Fine and Performing Arts Department 

Performing Arts : 

573 students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. There are 202 Middle School Chorus members. 
Instrumental and vocal students continued to participate through the audition process for district and state 
ensembles, and earned the following awards: 

■ 2 AHS students All-State 2 vocal 

■ 8 students - Senior District 2 vocal, 6 instrumental 

■ 21 students - Junior District 16 vocal, 5 instrumental (4 Orchestra, 1 Band) 

WMS, WHMS & DMS choruses performed National Anthem for Lock Monster Games in January and March 
2005. Handbell Choirs at WHMS performed at Fanieul Hall Marketplace in December 2005. New Pilot 3 rd grade 
String/Recorder program at Sanborn - 28 String players & 20 Recorder players 

Visual Arts : 

Andover High School 26 students' artwork was submitted to The Boston Globe and earned the following awards: 
4 Silver Key, 1 Gold Key, 5 Honorable Mentions, 2 Gold Keys - Senior Portfolio, 2 AHS students were accepted 
to Art All-State. At West Middle School 5 students won a poster design contest sponsored by the Massachusetts 
Dental Society. Each one of the five winning students from West received a $100 check and their artwork was put 
into a calendar, which was distributed to schools and businesses throughout the state. 65 students were involved 
in a Mardi Gras mask-making workshop in which each student donated $5 to make a mask and learn about this 
cultural event in Louisiana. All of the money collected went directly to the Art Department at Gretna Middle 
School in Louisiana. 

Dramatic Arts: 

The Technical Theatre course offers Survey of American Film, Art of Theatre, and Musical Theatre Workshop. The 
Music Theatre International (MTI) has selected the Andover High School Drama Guild to be featured in a video 
and a textbook published by Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. Also in January, we held auditions for our Massachusetts 
High School Drama Guild performing an adaptation of the classic American short story by Shirley Jackson 
entitled The Lottery. In March auditions were held for our annual Spring Drama Production, Agatha Christie's 
murder mystery, The Mousetrap. Following that in July, the first ever AHS Drama Guild Alumni production took 
place, the musical revue Side by Side by Sondheim. In September auditions were held for the fall production of 
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. For the first time this year, the Andover High School Drama 
Guild is proud to announce its selection to and participation in the North Shore Music Theatre Spotlight Awards. 

Technology Department 

The Technology Department's goal focused on enhancing student learning with technology for our students to 
access, collect, authenticate, manage, assess and analyze information effectively, efficiently, and ethically. 
Additionally, we supported the technical needs of the Business Department, Human Resources Department, 
Principal Office at each school, Pupil Personnel, the Offices of the Superintendent of Schools and assist the Town 
Plant & Facilities Department with the monitoring of the mechanical, heating, and security systems of town and 
school buildings. Our 6800 users depend on the Technology Department to provide them with a reliable, 
efficient, and effective computer network to conduct their daily tasks. We continually strove to improve services 
and the availability of equipment to the students, faculty, and administration. This year we installed new HP 
ProCurve switches in each school increasing internal network speed to 100 mb/s. The restrictions on funding 
required the technology department to extend the replacement cycle of computers to as long as nine years. We 
continued to repurpose our legacy equipment, moving existing equipment that has been replaced by new 
computers and printers to other locations within the school district. This past year we replaced 15% of our 2568 
computers, which is well below the 20% necessary to enable a 5-year rotation of equipment. To maximize tax 
dollars and address the computing needs of our studenreVthe School District took advantage of an offer from the 



Town Information Systems department and accepted 30 Legacy Gateway E-1600 computers and monitors. These 
computers were used in town offices over the past several years and now have been re-assigned to meet Middle 
School Special Education classrooms computer needs. The School/Town Institutional Cable Television and Data 
Network (the system that connects all of the school and town building together for voice, video, and data services) 
is now nine years old and its reliability and efficiency is causing mission critical operations to be negatively 
affected and needed application upgrades to be delayed. The school department is working closely with town 
officials to develop and implement a plan to replace the mission critical but aging Institutional Cable Television 
Network (I-Net). 

Physical Education Department 

Our K-12 Physical Education teachers strive to instill in their students an understanding of the importance of 
physical fitness and activity and the critical role it plays in their overall lifetime health and well-being. 
Implementing a comprehensive curriculum that is based upon the National Association for Sport and Physical 
Education standards as well as the Massachusetts Health Curriculum frameworks our students are taught a wide 
variety of movement concepts, health related components and skill related components of physical fitness as well 
as sports skills and activities that promote a healthy and active lifestyle. In addition to these curricular offerings 
elementary and middle school physical education teachers have run successful American Heart Association Jump 
Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart programs. A school district fifth grade track and field meet as well as 
separate 4 th and 5 th grade and middle school cross country meets were conducted by the respective physical 
education staffs. High School Physical Education teacher Wayne Puglisi was chosen by the Massachusetts 
Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance as their high school teacher of the year. High 
School Physical Education teacher Carol Martini continues to serve on the AAHPERD national committee for 
teaching standards. Brian McNally, department coordinator, serves as the state MAHPERD vice-president for 
the division of Boys and Men's Athletics. Several members of the Physical Education department presented 
sessions at the MAHPERD state convention. 

Athletic Department 

Andover High School is committed to the philosophy that athletics are an integral part of the total education 
process. Successful interscholastic athletic programs teach young people values such as accountability, 
commitment, teamwork, discipline, responsibility, persistence and leadership. Athletes are students first and 
athletes second. While winning contests is a laudable goal, it should not supersede primary priorities. Preparing 
students to succeed rather than merely to win games is the central focus. Win or lose, students should learn 
lessons of a lasting and positive nature. Andover High School was recipient of the Ernest B. Dalton Award from 
the Boston Globe for combined boys and girls winning percentage. Andover boys with a 136-50-7 record and 
girls with a 155-34-3 record led the entire state of Massachusetts in wins. Andover won the league championship 
in twelve different sports. The boys' tennis team and the girls' lacrosse team received Massachusetts 
Interscholastic Athletic Association Sportsmanship Awards. The girls' volleyball team went all the way to the 
state championship final. The girls' outdoor track and field team won the All-Class State Track Championship. 
The girls swimming and diving team won their unprecedented seventh straight Massachusetts State 
Championship at Harvard University. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 
Superintendent of Schools 



104 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution serving 
the communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover. The student body of 
approximately 1,470 students includes 18 students from Andover. The staff of nearly 200 
includes 26 who live in Andover, among them teachers, paraprofessionals and administrators, 
plus substitute teachers. 

GLTS is fully accredited by the New England Association of Schools & Colleges 
(NEASC). It restructured to a five-academy model several years ago, with the Freshman 
Academy and four career clusters or academies that create smaller learning environments for 
students and encourage integrated career and academic projects. 

Career academies include Advanced Science & Technology, with majors in Allied Health, 
Biotechnology, Electronics, Machine Technology/CAD, and Information Support Services; 
Business Communications, with majors in Fashion Design, Graphic Communications, Marketing 
and Office Technology; Construction, with majors in Building & Property Management, 
Carpentry, Electrical, Metal Fabrication, and Plumbing; and Service, with majors in Autobody, 
Automotive, Cosmetology, and Culinary Arts & Hospitality. 

Greater Lawrence offers a full academic program as well as career education in seventeen 
vocational-technical areas. Students and staff enjoy the rotating or "week about" schedule in 
which students spend one week in academic classes and the alternate week in their chosen career 
area. 

Some of the school's accomplishments and milestones of 2005 include: 

Five-Year Focused Visit from the New England Association of Schools & Colleges 
(NEASC) with "excellent" ratings in 10 out of 1 1 categories. 

National gold medals in Community Service at SkillsUSA for a team of students for their 
"Walk with Me, Talk with Me" project at Andover' s Ironstone Farm. Students volunteered 
as side walkers for the therapeutic horsemanship program, built a 32-foot long, 5-foot wide 
handicapped access ramp, made horse blankets and fabricated a metal horse for the State 
presentation. In all, 14 of the school's career areas participated. The school team took a gold 
medal in Massachusetts and came in first in the country among 48 competing projects. 

Special recognition at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Assistive Technology Design 
Fair. Under the tutelage of their physics teacher, a team of GLTS students, from Electronics, 
Machine Technology and Information Support Services programs, designed a walker with 
headlights for a legally blind senior citizen and were asked to present their project at the 
engineering design event. 

National certification from the prestigious American Culinary Federation for the Culinary 
Arts & Hospitality program. 



105 



Checks and compliments for commissioned artwork that will appear as part of the permanent 
collection at Andover's renovated Powder Mill residence. Three students won top honors and 
a place at the mill for their paintings, but sponsor Northpoint Realty was so impressed with 
the quality of the artwork that they recognized all 25 participants. 

"A Community of Learners Dedicated to Service and Excellence" is the school's motto. They 
believe that community service is an important part of being a good citizen; in technical 
education, rendering service can provide mutual benefits. Each year the school's member 
communities and nonprofit organizations within the Greater Lawrence area submit requests for 
consideration. Requests can be for services or projects that will have educational value for the 
students who complete them. The following projects in Andover were planned or scheduled 
during the 2004-05 school year: 



Andover Community Trust House Project 

Andover Chamber of Commerce "Taste of Andover" participant 

Andover Historical Society - repair/paint fence 

Andover Senior Citizen Center - print color copies 

Bancroft School - paint and assemble propeller cars 



106 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

The mission of the Commission on Disability is to address Andover's needs for the Town, 
its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. 



The Andover Commission on Disability is a commission of nine volunteers serving three- 
year terms and appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability-related issues. The 
majority of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to disability. The 
goals of the Commission are as follows: 

To advocate for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in 
the Town of Andover. 

To research the needs and problems of people with disabilities in the Town of Andover. 
To advise and assist Town officials and employees in addressing the needs of people with 
disabilities. 

To provide information, referral, guidance and technical assistance to individuals, public 
agencies, business and organizations in matters pertaining to disability. 
~ To participate to the maximum extent possible in disability-related programs of a local, 

regional, state and federal nature. 

To support training related to disability to people who reside or work in the Town of 
Andover. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

The Commission's areas of concentration during 2005 were: 

The introduction and sponsorship of an innovative and vital rescue program known as Project 

Lifesaver in partnership with the Andover Police Department. The program is available to 

participants through the 91 1 system. 

Identifying downtown businesses that could be made more accessible with reasonable 

modifications. 

Offering disability training in partnership with SEP AC for the well-attended "Executive 

Function Disorder" lecture. 

The publication of a semi-annual disability newsletter to provide a resource to the 

community. Copies are also available on the Town's web site. 

PROJECT LIFESAVER 

The Commission purchased and implemented Project Lifesaver in partnership with the 
Andover Police Department. Autism, Alzheimer's, Down's Syndrome and various neurological 
disorders can cause individuals to have a tendency to wander and become lost. Technology has 
now produced a rescue tool utilizing wristband transmitters to locate missing people. Participants 
in the program, which is conducted by trained officers of the Andover Police Department, wear a 
personalized wristband which emits a silent radio frequency unique to that individual twenty- 
four hours a day. When caregivers notify the Police Department that the person is missing, a 



107 



Search and Rescue Team responds to the wanderer's area and starts searching with a mobile 
locater tracking system. The signal is tracked on the ground or in the air for up to two miles. The 
average time it takes to find the missing person is twenty- two minutes. 

Since the inception of the program in 1999, more than 200 law enforcement agencies in 
thirty-nine states in the United States and Canada have logged a 100% success rate in more than 
1,265 searches. All were found alive and returned home. Search times have been reduced from 
hours and days to minutes. Prompt rescue in New England temperatures is a key factor and 
Project Lifesaver has become internationally recognized as a proven program that saves lives. 
Andover is the first North Shore, Essex County community to implement the system. 

PHYSICAL ACCESS FOR THE DISABLED 

In anticipation of the Main Street Project, the Commission reviewed one hundred 
downtown businesses located on the renovation route. After conferring with the Planning 
Department, it was determined that twenty-four businesses met the set criteria indicating they 
could be made more accessible, with reasonable modifications, for those in wheelchairs. Letters 
were sent to the business/property owners. The Commission will work with the 
merchants/property owners to assist them in complying with the Americans with Disability Act. 

PUBLICATION OF A NEWSLETTER AND MAINTENANCE OF A WEBSITE 

The Commission's newsletter is available at various locations throughout the Town 
including the Town Offices, Senior Center, Old Town Hall, Memorial Hall Library. It can also 
be found on the Town's website. The newsletter is intended to inform residents of new programs 
and services for the disabled as well as areas of concern needing advocacy. 

The Commission improved its website which includes several new links. 
Access to other Commissions on Disability throughout the State and several ADA resources are 
now available. The "Frequently Asked Questions" section has been increased to provide links to 
State agencies for the disabled. The site includes links to important names and telephone 
numbers as well as past issues of the Commission's newsletter. You can access the website 
at: http://andoverma.gov/boards/disability 



108 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in the 
following areas: 

Demolition Delay Bylaw 

The Commission heard demolition requests for nine properties and imposed delays of zero to 
twelve months. Three historically significant buildings will be demolished after the delay period ends. 
One house was moved. Five structures were determined to be not historically significant and were 
demolished. Twenty-two applications were reviewed for historic appropriateness. The Ballardvale 
Local Historic District Commission permitted demolition of one house with rebuilding conditions 
established by the District Commission. 

Dimensional Special Permit/Historic Preservation 

Two requests were submitted - one was approved and one was withdrawn. 

Local Historic Districts 

The Commission and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission work cooperatively on issues 
of mutual interest. Lynn Smiledge is the Commission's representative on the BVHDC. 

Heritage Education 

The 15 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held in May at Memorial Hall Library in 
cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission. The 
Awards Program recognizes outstanding examples of historic preservation in the community. Eight 
property owners and two individuals received recognition for their efforts. 

Projects of Note 

The Essex National Heritage Commission approved the first phase of a grant to update and add 
to Andover' s Historic Building Survey. The grant was submitted as a collaborative project of the 
Preservation Commission, Andover Historical Society and Memorial Hall Library. This important project 
begins the process of digitizing the general survey of Andover's historic buildings from the late 1 7th 
century through the early 20th century by creating a database that can be searched, sorted by category or 
modified as new information becomes available. Upon completion, the web site, hosted by Memorial 
Hall Library, will allow internet access to this information. 

Commission members Karen Herman and Jim Batchelder presented sessions on "Moved 
Buildings in Andover" and the Town's Dimensional Special Permit/Historic Preservation Bylaw at the 
Merrimack Valley Preservation Group (MVPG) LEAP/Historic Preservation Regional Conference in 
Haverhill in May. This was the first regional preservation conference to be held in the Merrimack 
Valley. 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
community character. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of the Dimensional Special 
Permit for Historic Preservation. The Commission also encourages individual homeowners to consider 
preservation restrictions or easements for the long-term protection of their historic properties. 

Acting in their advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources assist individual building owners understand the meaning of 
histonc preservation, instruct them on the selection of appropriate materials and direct them to 
appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. 



109 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. Monthly meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room, 1 00 Morton Street, 
except during the months of January, May and October when meetings are held at the Frye 
Circle Community Room, 256 North Main Street. The Housing Authority Board Members and 
Director are as follows: 

Ronald. Hajj - Chairman Paul Higgenbottom - Asst. Treasurer 

James Cuticchia - Vice Chairman Calvin Deyermond - State Appointee 
Francis O'Connor - Treasurer Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Ex. Director 

The Housing Authority manages 218 units of State-aided housing for elder/disabled 
people on Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. There are 56 units 
of family housing in Memorial Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. 
Chapter 689 program and administers five Alternative Housing Vouchers (AHVP) for a total of 
288 State-aided units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits 

1 person $40,250 3 people $51,750 5 people $62,100 7 people $71,300 

2 people $46,000 4 people $57,500 6 people $66,700 8 people $75,900 
Apartment Turnover: 30 Elder/Disabled Units (14%) 6 Family Units (1 1%) 

Average Rent: $288 - Elder/Disabled Program $409 - Family Program (includes utilities) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 

• Memorial Circle - Basement Drainage Project - increase $28,000 

Stowe Court - Installation of Sprinker System - Planning Grant - $26,000 

Frye Circle - Planning Grant for Sidewalks - $42,825 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons for Youth Program 

An after-school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the 
Andover Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance Program. 

State/ AHA Rent Escrow Program 

Allows Memorial Circle Tenants to escrow partial rent payments specifically to transition out 
of public housing. Two tenants remain in the program. 

Federally- funded Programs 

Income limits for Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program through HUD. 

1 person $26,500 3 people $34,100 5 People $40,900 7 People $46,950 

2 people $30,300 4 people $37,900 6 People $43,950 8 People $50,000 

Family Self Sufficiency Program 

Eleven participants with five escrowing partial rent payments monthly. In 2005, two 
participants used their escrow funds to purchase homes in Andover. 



110 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



2003 2004 2005 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of animals testing positive for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of dogs quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of bams inspected 

Number of beef cattle 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of horses 

Number of donkeys 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 2, 2005 at the West 
Middle School. 



22 


21 


24 





5 


10 











63 


63 


52 


8 


28 


3 


18 


19 


17 


17 


14 


4 


3 


20 


6 


2 


3 


3 


85 


73 


64 


4 


4 


4 











2 


1 


4 


72 


65 


85 


2 


2 


1 



111 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

In 2005, the Trustees acted on eleven cases, disbursing $18,133.14 on approved cases (which 
numbered nine) and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The 
principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income are invested under the 
direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers 
approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2004 $105,922.71 

Receipts - 2005 16,937.40 

$125,185.25 
Disbursements - 2005 18,133.14 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2005 $104,726.97 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved four applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/04 $5 1 ,852.72 

Income - FY-2005 1,864.82 

Expenditures - FY-2005 1,900.00 

Balance as of 6/30/05 $51,817.54 



112 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2005 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



Money Market Fund 
Securities @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 



1/1/05 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



12/31/05 



$10,000.00 -Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities ($10,730.15) Money Market Fund $10,624.38 

231,972.52 -Transfers to/from Operating Accts. 0.00 Securities @ Book 219,369.99 

0.00 -Adj. to lower of Cost/Market 0.00 Res.for Cost/Mkt. 0.00 

- Investment Counsel Fees (1 ,248.00) 



$241,972.52 



Decrease 



($11,978.15) 



$229,994.37 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



INCOME 



Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 



$7,459.09 Dividends Received 
2,103.48 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
6,725.67 Interest Received-Other 



$16,288.24 



Income Total 



$7,574.42 Savings Account 
856.00 Checking Account 
497.05 Money Market Fund 



8,927.47 



$7,645.43 

278.54 

12,414.80 

$20,338.77 



EXPENSES 



Andover High School Projects 
Misc. Operating Expenses 


$4,103.45 
773.49 


Expense Total 


4,876.94 


Net GainZ(Loss) 
TRANSFERS 


4,050.53 



- To/From Principal 



0.00 



Increase 



$4,050.53 



$258,260.76 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$250,333.14 



113 



PFSFA A2.O60 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF: December 31, 2005 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

Money Market Fund 

STOCKS & BONDS 

500 Shs. Atmos Energy Corp. 
300 Shs. Diebold, Inc. 
300 Shs. Honeywell Intl. Inc. 
300 Shs. Keyspan Corp. 
200 Shs. Kimberiy Clark Corp. 
300 Shs. Meadwestvaco Corp 
300 Shs. National City Corp. 
250 Shs. Peoples Energy Corp 
500 Shs. Pepco Inc. 
300 Shs. Pioneer Nat. Res. Co. 
300 Shs. Raytheon Co. New 
500 Shs. Sara Lee Corp. 
400 Shs. Southern Co. 
500 Shs.TodcoCI. A 
300 Shs. Unilever PLC 
400 Shs. Vectren Corp. 
200 Shs. Verizon Communications 
$40,000 FHLB,4.28%,11/05/07,Callable 5/05/06 



BOOK VALUE 



$10,624.38 



TOTAL STOCKS & BONDS 

TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 
Reserve for Lower of Cost /Market 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknorth 

TOTAL FUNDS 



219,369.99 

229,994.37 

0.00 

1,994.37 



$7,645.43 
12,414.80 

$20,060.23 



$278.54 
$250,333.14 



MARKET VALUE 



$10,624.38 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 
BOOK VALUE 



$0.00 



10,529.50 


13,080.00 


2,550.50 


11,050.26 


11,400.00 


349.74 


10,673.98 


11,175.00 


501.02 


11,164.35 


10,707.00 


(457.35) 


11,696.03 


11,930.00 


233.97 


9,805.24 


8,409.00 


(1,396.24) 


10,552.35 


10,071.00 


(481.35) 


10,937.75 


8,767.50 


(2,170.25) 


10,050.03 


11,185.00 


1,134.97 


9,898.25 


15,381.00 


5,482.75 


9,446.23 


12,045.00 


2,598.77 


10,990.25 


9,450.00 


(1,540.25) 


12,047.25 


13,812.00 


1,764.75 


9,269.80 


19,030.00 


9,760.20 


11,631.94 


12,036.00 


404.06 


9,912.28 


10,864 00 


951.72 


9,714.50 


6,024.00 


(3,690.50) 


40,000.00 


39,66240 


(337.60) 



235,028.90 

245,653.28 

0.00 

$245,653.28 



$20,060.23 

$278.54 
$265,992.05 



15,658.91 



15,658.91 
0.00 



$15,658.91 



$0.00 

$0.00 
$15,658.91 



Change in Market Value from 1/1/05 



($71.32) 



114 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED: December 31, 200S 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 

J.W.BARNARD 

ALICE M.BELL 

THOMAS BLACK 

EDNA G.CHAPIN 

FRED W.DOYLE 

WARREN F.DRAPER 

WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 

ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 

MYRON E.GUTTERSON 

ANDOVER GRANGE 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 

PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 

ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 

HENRY WYATT 

A.F.B. &W.A. TROW 

RES. FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 





ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 








BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 


1/1/05 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 
$0.00 


12/31/05 


$1 ,049.55 




$72.08 


$1,121.63 


$1,121.63 


7,813.80 




536.61 


8,350.41 


100.00 * 


8,250.41 


1,174.06 




80.63 


1,254.69 


0.00 * 


1,254.69 


15,661.27 




1,075.53 


16,736.80 


500.00 


16,236.80 


2,649.32 




181.94 


2,831.26 


30.00 * 


2,801.26 


10,555.82 




724.92 


11,280.74 


0.00 


11,280.74 


1,729.21 




118.75 


1,847.96 


10.00 * 


1,837.96 


2,970.21 




203.98 


3,174.19 


0.00 


3,174.19 


1,189.64 




81.70 


1,271.34 


10.00 * 


1,261.34 


1,634.49 




112.25 


1,746.74 


0.00 


1,746.74 


2,960.77 




203.33 


3.164.10 


50.00 * 


3,114.10 


19.966.76 




1,371.21 


21,337.97 


500.00 


20,837.97 


30,829.02 




2,117.17 


32,946.19 


0.00 


32,946.19 


10,991.52 




754.84 


11,746.36 


300.00 * 


11,446.36 


27,784.32 




1,908.08 


29,692.40 


0.00 


29,692.40 


12,675.62 


989.00 -A) 


870.49 


14,535.11 


500.00 


14,035.11 


90,053.21 




9,052.64 


99,105.85 


8,000.00 


91,105.85 


0.00 


$989.00 


0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


$241,688.59 


$19,466.13 


$262,143.72 


$10,000.00 


$252,143.72 



Interest Income 
Dividend Income 
Capital Gain Distributions 
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Securities 
Adj. to Lower of Cost/Market 



(A-Add'l funds contributed by Town Employees- 8/05 
'Combined funds of $500 given as one scholarship. 



$267.87 
7,589.57 
8.736.34 
2,872.35 
0.00 



NET INCOME 



$19,466.13 



FUNDS HELD 

TD BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT 
FEDERATED CAPITAL RES MONEY MARKET FUND 
2,578.907 Shs. AMERICAN BALANCED FUND 
885,319 Shs. CAPITAL INCOME BUILDER FUND 
14,529.012 Shs. FRANKLIN INCOME FUND 
1,203.435 Shs. TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 
Total - Individual Scholarship Funds 
FED. CAP. RES. MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 
1 ,01 1 .476 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND 

517,003 Shs. PIONEER SMALL CAP/TROW FUND 
4,900,601 Shs. PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND 

Total - Trow Scholarship Funds 
RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 




VALUE 


VALUE 


Variance 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


8,574.85 


8,574.85 


0.00 


45,956.12 


47,329.79 


(1,373.67) 


46,948.47 


46,523.50 


424.97 


34.869.63 


36,100.00 


(1,230.37) 


27.017.12 


22.509.73 


4.507.39 


163.366.19 


161.037.87 


2J52JL32 


8,315.82 


8,315.82 


0.00 


29,090.05 


27,068.18 


2,021.87 


16,590.63 


10,721.85 


5,868.78 


52,632.45 


45.000.00 


7.632.45 


$106,628.95 


$91,105.85 


$15,523.10 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


$269,995.14 


$252,143.72 


$17,851.42 



115 



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."? *3 







TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2005 



Revenues: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Other Excise 

Penalties/Interest on Taxes and Excises 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Fees 

Charges for Services - Water 

Charges for Services - Sewer 

Departmental Revenue - School 

Departmental Revenue - Library 

Other Departmental Revenue 

Licenses and Permits 

Special Assessments 

Fines and Forfeits 

Investment Income 

Other 

Intergovernmental 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Tax Titles 
Offsets 

DCS 

Elder Services 

Rentals 

Off Duty Admin Fee 

Cemetery Internment Fees 

Ambulance Fees 

Medicare 



Expenditures: 

General Government 

Community Development 

Community Service 

Elder Services 

Municipal Maintenance 

Public Safety 

Water Enterprise 

Sewer Enterprise 

Public Works 

Library 

School 

Health Insurance 

Insurance 

Debt Service 

Gen Fund Special Articles 

Retirement 

State & County Assessments 



Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Debt Activity 
Interfund Transfers 
Other 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over 
(Under) Expenditures and Other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 

Fund Balance July 1 , 2004 

Fund Balance June 30, 2005 



Governmental Fund Type 
General Capital Special 

Fund Projects Revenue 



Proprietary Fund Type 

Water Sewer Internal 

Enterprise Enterprise Service 



Fiduciary 



Expendable 
Trust 



4,666,645 

764,164 

335.008 

2,016 

50,014 





29.590 

20,339 

250,943 

2,373.544 

546 

467,873 

387,504 



9,318,928 

78,353,240 

1 .896,484 

380.214 



5,959,589.25 



4.132,786.32 



5,917,242.49 
4,454,162.17 



45,414.42 



387.41 



9,180.76 
11,251,891.93 



98,521.06 
154,097.68 



15.000,000.00 



519.264.72 

177,068.45 

86,551.86 

91.124.50 

59.535.00 

753,300.29 

283,806.00 



101.267.708.52 15,000,000.00 10.371,404.66 6.005,003.67 4,133,173.73 11,261.072.69 



3,037,464.44 




430,820.78 


1,334,021.15 


799,528.88 


361,659 27 


884.681.53 




458.866.54 


669,640.82 




108,372.55 


4,562,622.52 


2,811,474.66 


96,684.19 


11,834,255.92 


839,487.70 


1,893,726.99 


0.00 


2,603,853.04 




0.00 


5.234,093.94 




5,467.495.30 


665.256.29 


884,981.17 


2.321,272.30 


3,188.15 


139,960.20 


48.545,27878 


218,178.18 


5.793,411.36 


8,463,109.00 






631,447.25 






12.713,206 54 






82,835.59 






3,597,440.00 






1,599.527.00 







11,330,298.78 



120,220.36 



3,254,637.83 



1,625,720.53 



105,744,298.14 13,175,060.84 10,168.483.05 3,254,637.83 1,625,720.53 .11,330,298.78 



(19,838.000 00) 

2.991,744.46 2,042,780.49 

(107,923.71) 



234.530.65 (2,994.361.18) (2,740,959.00) 
(14.636.83) (17,589.69) 



203,441.75 



262,822.83 
0.00 



Total 
(Memo Only) 



4,666, 

764, 

335, 

2, 

50, 

5.959, 

4,132, 

5,946, 

20, 

4,705, 

2,373, 

467 

541 

11,405 

24,318 

78,353, 

1,896 

380 



252,618.74 148,290.982.01 



14,918, 

2,495, 

1.343, 

778, 

7,470, 

14,567 
5,858, 
6.859, 
7,017, 
2,464, 

54.556 

8,463 

631 

12,713 

82 

3,597 

1,599 



645.27 
164.00 
008.52 
016.00 
014.35 
589.25 
786.32 
832.51 
339.62 
105.93 
544.51 
546.00 
873.81 
.007.80 
989.61 
.928.00 
240.73 
484.62 
214.34 



519,264.72 

177.068.45 

86,551.86 

91,124.50 

59,535.00 

753,300.29 

283,806.00 



804.36 
209.30 
548.07 
013.37 
781.37 
470.61 
490.87 
814.47 
732.76 
420.65 
868.32 
109.00 
447.25 
206.54 
835.59 
440.00 
527.00 



120,220.36 145,418,719.53 






2,883,820.75 (17,795,219.51) 



219,893.82 (3.011,950.87) (2,740.959.00) 



(19,838,000.00) 

0.00 

(140,150.23) 



203,441.75 262,822.83 (19,978,150.23) 



(1,592,768.87) (15,970,280.35) 422,815.43 (261,585.03) (233,505.80) 

7,771,046.35 11,106,039.16 3.324,585.91 3,761,325.78 169,587.59 



134,215.66 
934,913.06 



395,221.21 
2,996,608.33 



(17,105,887.75) 
30,064,106.18 



6,178.277.48 (4,864,241.19) 3,747,401.34 3.499,740.75 (63,918.21) 1,069,128.72 3,391,829.54 12,958.218.43 



117 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

RECAP OF GENERAL FUND 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2005 





RES FOR 


APPROP 


OFFSET 


RESERVE 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


EXPENDED 


RES FOR 


TRANS TO 




ENCUM 


(ORIGINAL) 


RECEIPTS 


FUND 




AVAILABLE 




ENCUM 


UNRES FD BL 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




















Personal Services 




1,997,92100 




1.983 00 


(11.000 00) 


1,988.904 00 


1.966.10553 


22.700 00 


98 47 


Other Expenses 


143.952 53 


1.012.729 00 




7,350 00 


(34.000 00) 


1.130,031 53 


1.068.601 87 


58,409 66 


3,020 00 




143.952 53 


3.010.650 00 


000 


9.333 00 


(45,000 00) 


3.118,935 53 


3.034.707 40 


81,109 66 


3.11847 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 




















Personal Services 


00 


1.208.874 00 




20.20200 


6,000 00 


1,235,076 00 


1.221.688 34 


13.300 00 


87 66 


Other Expenses 


12.67424 


100.325 00 




000 


000 


112,999 24 


112.332 81 


00 


66643 




12,67424 


1.309,19900 


00 


20,202 00 


6.000 00 


1,348,075 24 


1.334.021 15 


13.300 00 


754 09 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 




















Personal Services 




311.438 00 


295,700 00 




8.000 00 


615,138 00 


611.988 70 


3.149 30 


00 


Other Expenses 


4.208 50 


51,150 00 


218.120 00 




000 


273,47850 


272.692 83 


785 67 


00 




4.208 50 


362,588 00 


513.820 00 


00 


8,000 00 


888.61650 


884.681 53 


3.93497 


00 


ELDER SERVICES 




















Personal Services 




448.788 00 


162,000 00 




(44.000 00) 


566.788 00 


558.169 13 


8.600 00 


18.87 


Other Expenses 


2.99550 


114.000 00 


00 






116.995 50 


111.471 69 


3.053 43 


2.47038 




2.995 50 


562.788 00 


162.000 00 


00 


(44.000 00) 


683.783 50 


669.640 82 


11.653 43 


2.48925 


MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 




















Personal Services 


7.754.00 


2.527.27500 


143,000 00 




104.505 00 


2.782.534 00 


2.763.621 19 


21,600 00 


(2.687 19) 


Other Expenses 


1.203,716 80 


1.119.710 00 




32.800 00 


(233.731 32) 


2.122.495 48 


1.799.001 33 


309.571 35 


13.922 80 




1.211,470 80 


3.646.985 00 


143.000 00 


32.800 00 


(129.226 32) 


4.905,029 48 


4.562.62252 


331.171 35 


11,235 61 


PUBLIC SAFETY 




















Personal Services 




9.957.467 00 


810.000 00 


41.785 00 


148.791 00 


10.958.043 00 


10.864.07823 


90.000 00 


3.96477 


Other Expenses 


105.715 46 


932.52900 






13.600 00 


1.051.844 46 


970.177 69 


75.36527 


6,301 50 




105.715 46 


10.889.996 00 


810.000 00 


41.785 00 


162.391 00 


12.009.887 46 


11,834.255 92 


165,365 27 


10,26627 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 


















Personal Services 




1.460.729 00 




92.190 00 


39.000 00 


1.591.91900 


1.575.519 00 


16.400 00 


000 


Other Expenses 


304.069 61 


3.675.250 00 






200.000 00 


4.179.31961 


3.891.976 30 


198.901 98 


88.441 33 




304.069 61 


5.135.979 00 


000 


92,190 00 


239.000 00 


5.771.238 61 


5.467,495 30 


215,301 98 


88,441 33 


LIBRARY 




















Personal Services 




1.791.893 00 






36.000 00 


1.827.893 00 


1.806.318 86 


21,500 00 


74 14 


Other Expenses 


22.670 46 


524.200 00 






00 


546.870 46 


514.953 44 


31,877 44 


39 58 




22.670 46 


2.316.093 00 


00 


00 


36.000 00 


2.374,763 46 


2.321.272 30 


53.377 44 


11372 


SCHOOL 




















Personal Services 




38.206.785 00 






295.30676 


38.502.091 76 


38.401.166 76 


100.92500 


00 


Other Expenses 


326.867 40 


10.292.60200 


100.000 00 




(265.716 74) 


10.453.752 66 


10.020.586 27 


433.166 39 


00 


GLRVTHS 




119.836 00 




3.690 00 




123.526 00 


123.525 75 


000 


25 




326.867 40 


48.619.223 00 


100.000 00 


3.690 00 


29.590 02 


49.079.370 42 


48,545.278 78 


534,091 39 


025 


UNCLASSIFIED 




















Compensation Fund 












00 






00 


Reserve Fund 




200.000 00 




(200.000 00) 




00 






00 




00 


200.000 00 


00 


(200.000 00) 


000 


00 


00 


00 


0,00 


FIXED EXPENSES 




















Debt Service - Interest 


7,000 00 


4.325.085 00 








4.332,085 00 


4.123,206 66 


7.000 00 


201,878 34 


Debt Service - Pnncipal 




8.590.001 00 








8,590,001 00 


8,589,999 88 




1,12 


Insurance 




741,000 00 






(109.552 75) 


631.447 25 


631,447.25 




000 


Health Insurance Fund 




8,325,000 00 






138.109 00 


8.463.109 00 


8.463,109 00 




00 


Unemployment Comp 




00 








000 






000 


Retirement 




3.735,549 00 






(138.109 00) 


3.597.440 00 


3.597.440 00 




00 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



7,000 00 


25,716.635 00 


00 


000 


(109.552 75) 


25,614.082 25 


25.405.202 79 


7.000 00 


201.879 46 


2.141.624 50 


101,770.136 00 


1.728,820 00 


00 


153,201 95 


105,793,782 45 


104.059,178 51 


1.416,305 49 


318.298 45 


352.963 51 


360.097 00 
1.625.100,00 








360.097 00 
1.978.063 51 


325.01415 

1,300.706 38 


3.300 00 
394.537 07 


31.782 85 
282,820 06 



352.963 51 



1,985.197 00 



2.338,160 51 



1.625.720 53 



314,602 91 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
Personal Services 
Other Expenses 



GRAND TOTAL 



4.82500 
672.421 57 



1.570,275 00 
2,097,72500 



1,575.100 00 
2.770,146,57 



1.486.215,93 
1.768,421 90 



15.000.00 
711,732.72 



73.88407 
289.991 95 



677,246 57 


3,668.000 00 


00 


00 


000 


4,345,246 57 


3,254,637 83 


726,732.72 


363.87602 


1,030.210 08 


5,653.197 00 


000 


00 


00 


6,683,407 08 


4,880,35836 


1,124,569 79 


678,478 93 


3,171.834 58 


107.423,333 00 


1.728.820 00 


000 


153,201 95 


112,477,189 53 


108,939,536 87 


2,540,875.28 


996.777 38 



118 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL FUND SPECIAL ARTICLES 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2005 



ARTICLE 
NUMBER 



ARTICLE 
TITLE 



CONTINUED APPROPRIATION TOTAL EXPENDED CONTINUED 

APPROPRIATION AVAILABLE APPROPRIATION 



ANNUAL UNPAID BILLS 

ART 39, 2000 TRANSCRIBE SELECTMEN'S MTG 

ART 89, 1 999 OPPOSE GAS PLANT 

ANNUAL FIREWORKS FUND 

ART 40, 1 997 RECORD SCH/PL 

ART 36, 2002 ASSESSORS REASSESSMENT 

ART 45, 1 992 WAR MEMORIAL 



0.00 

377.00 

78.66 

6.186.62 

309.29 

82,120.80 

1,034.63 





0.00 






377.00 


377.00 




78.66 




9,000.00 


15,186.62 


6,000.00 




309.29 


309.29 




82,120.80 


56,845.80 




1,034.63 





0.00 

0.00 

78.66 

9,186.62 

0.00 

25,275.00 

1,034.63 



90.107.00 



9,000.00 



99,107.00 



63,532.09 



35,574.91 



ART 57, 1995 
ART 44, 1987 
ART 65-4, 1998 
ART 98, 1 999 
ART 60, 2003 



ART 48, 1997 
ART 49, 1997 



ART 31,1999 
ART 21 , 2000 
ART 22, 2000 
ART 16,2002 



WETLAND BYLAW 
ELM SQ TRAFFIC SIGNAL 
TRAFFIC SIGNALS 
BALLARDVALE SIGN 
EXECUTIVE ORDER 418 



ART 43, 1 996 DISPATCH CENTER 



RIVER ROAD LAND 
BURTT ROAD 



SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 
SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 
ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 
ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 



TOTAL GENERAL FUND 



1,461.19 
5,313.08 

1,599.10 
4,000.00 
5.500.00 




1,461.19 
5,313.08 
1,599.10 
4,000.00 
5,500.00 


5,500.00 


1,461.19 
5,313.08 
1,599.10 
4,000.00 
0.00 


17.873.37 
857.80 


0.00 


17,873.37 
857.80 


5,500.00 


12,373.37 
857.80 


857.80 

5,000.00 
100 00 


0.00 


857.80 

5,000.00 

100.00 


0.00 


857.80 

5,000.00 
100.00 


5.100 00 

4.000.00 

2.000.00 

4,43850 

24.42366 


0.00 


5,100.00 

4,000.00 

2,000.00 

4,438.50 

24,423.66 


0.00 

4,247.00 

9,556.50 


5,100.00 

4,000.00 

2,000.00 

191.50 

14,867.16 


34.862 16 


0.00 


34,862.16 


13,803.50 


21,058.66 


148.800 33 


9.000.00 


157.800.33 


82,835.59 


74,964.74 



119 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL REVENUE/GRANTS ROLLFORWARD 

JUNE 30, 2005 



BALANCE 
07/01/04 



Reclassification 

07/01/04 INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



DEPART- 
MENTAL 



TOTAL 
EXPEND 



OFU 



BALANCE 
06/30/05 



PWED G-9403 
FEDERAL CDBG 



ELECTION OT GRANT 

STATE GENERAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS 



(41884) 


41884 














000 


(418 84) 


418 84 


00 


000 


00 


0.00 


00 


000 


0.00 


6.449 96 




4.848 00 








2.178 83 




9.119.13 



6.449 96 



000 0.00 



2.17883 



9.11913 



FY03 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT 

FY03 COMMUNITY POLICING 

FY04 MEMA 

REGIONAL EMERG RESPONSE PLAN 

MEMA 

BULLETPROOF VEST PARTNERSHIP 

LOCAL PREPAREDNESS GRANT 

ASSISTANCE TO FIREFIGHTERS GRANT 

FIREFIGHTER SAFETY EQUIPMENT 

DISASTER REIMBURSEMENTS 

POLICE ANTENNEA 

COPS MORE 2000 

ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING 

STATE PUBLIC SAFETY GRANTS 

PWED 

PWED G-9403 

CHAPTER 90 

STATE PUBLIC WORKS GRANTS 

HEALTHY COMMUNITY 

LAHEY CLINIC NUTRITIONAL GRANT 

RECYCLE INCENTIVE 

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT 

SERVING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 

MOTHER GOOSE ASKS WHY GRANT 

ARTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

RIGHT TO KNOW 

NATIONAL LEADERSHIP GRANT 

SECONDHAND SMOKE INITIATIVE 

LIBRARY AID CH 78 SEC 19A 

NEW HORIZONS FOR YOUTH 

FY03 COA FORMULA GRANT 

OTHER STATE GRANTS 



(1,696 27) 

(16.41886) 

(175.38) 

132.928 42 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

18.746 69 

0.00 

000 



133.384 60 

71.445 79 
0.00 

(178.007 93) 



(106.562 14) 

14.001 15 

7.666 17 

41.477 92 

(19.426 19) 

11,057 06 

000 

23,014 42 

97330 

264 36 

1.000 00 

83.703 52 

000 

000 



10,965 77 
38,000 00 

113,545 00 
279.18165 
5.729 43 
10.166 45 
21.438 00 
41.000 00 
20.663 82 

24.985 00 



12.121 61 

35.44378 

(175.38) 

210.533 72 

279.181.65 

5.72943 

10,166 45 

12.508 00 

34.41932 

20.663 82 

1.61611 

24.985 00 



300 00 



300 00 565.675 12 00 12.000 00 3.952 48 

1.41695 



(41884) 



55.921 65 



808.619 97 



859,544 94 



55.921 65 
6.02490 



(41884) 808.61997 1.41695 55.92165 

59.74824 
79 95 



17,589 69 



10.825 00 
10.000 00 



42.293 74 

3.61174 18.083 47 

849 60 27.394 00 



3.220 00 



859.544 94 
60.74245 

3.012.41 

20.738 08 
4.875 02 
7.779 00 



33.688 06 
21.695 21 
27.87881 



61.946 55 
14.23471 



(2.852 11) 

(1.862.64) 

0.00 

25.673.25 

000 

000 

000 

8.930 00 

153.33 

ooo 

21.083 06 

00 

300 00 



51.42489 

72.86274 

(41884) 

(234.957 80) 



(162.51390) 

(1.227 77) 

7.66617 

38.545 46 

00 

23201 

5.12498 

18,45542 

97330 

264.36 

1,000 00 

92.309 20 

00 

(39 21) 



163.731 71 



4.461 34 



168.424 40 



00 17.589 69 5.056 50 



180.409 04 



163.30392 



P&F DAMAGE RESTITUTION 

TOWN DAMAGE RESTITUTION 

PUBLIC SAFETY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 

PUBLIC WORKS DAMAGE RESTITUTION 

LIBRARY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 

DMM FIELDS REVOLVING 

OFF STREET PARKING 

CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS FUND 

SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

WETLAND FILING FEES 

RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION 



9.126 36 
27.544 04 

4.026 25 

9.549 49 
12.967 02 
34.436 67 
155.168 12 

5.227 33 
18,870 00 

4.692 86 



(9,126 36) 
(27,544 04) 
(4.02625) 
(9.549 49) 
(12.967 02) 
(34.43667) 



000 

00 

00 

000 

000 

000 

198.956.20 

5.227 33 

18.870 00 

42.327 36 



281.608 14 



(97.649 83) 



000 0.00 171.179C 



265.380 89 



120 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL REVENUE/GRANTS ROLLFORWARD 

JUNE 30, 2005 



SPED ENTITLEMENT 

SPED ENTITLEMENT 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION 

SPED IMPROVEMENT 

SPED IMPROVEMENT 

SPED SUMMER INSTITUTE 

SPED SUMMER INSTITUTE/CAST 

SPED MCAS ALT ASSESSMENT 242 

CHAPTER 70 

50/50 PROGRAM 

CIRCUIT BREAKER 

DRUG FREE SCHOOLS 

TITLE I READING 

TITLE V 

TITLE V 

TECH LIT\ENHANCED ED 

TECH UT\ENHANCED ED 

TECH UT\ENHANCED ED 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

PROF DEB TEACHER QUALITY 140 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

AHS WORKFORCE GRANT 

CORPORATE GRANTS 

EQUIPMENT GRANT 

ANDOVER HIGH DONATIONS 

AHS MARCHING BAND DONATIONS 

OTHER GIFTS AND GRANTS 

ANDOVER CARES 

AIRS 

COLLINS CTR REVOLVING 

REVOLVING FUNOS EDUCATION 

ATHLETIC REVOLVING 
REVOLVING FUNDS ATHLETIC 

NEW HORIZONS FOR YOUTH 

FY03 COA FORMULA GRANT 

CDPCH44SEC53E1/2 

C44 S53 DCS REVOLVING 

CH 44 S53 YOUTH SERVICES 

COA CH44 SEC 53E 1/2 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CH 44 S53E1/2 LIBRARY AUDIO/VISUAL 

REVOLVING CHAPTER 44 53 E 1/2 

FRONTAGE ROAD 
RECYCLABLE BATTERY PROGR 
ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING 
P&F DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
TOWN DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
PUBLIC SAFETY DAMAGE REST 
PUBLIC WORKS DAMAGE REST 
LIBRARY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
DMM FIELDS REVOLVING 
OTHER REVOLVING FUNDS 



BALANCE 
07/01/04 

59.842.60 

000 

2.977 34 

000 

26.611.07 

0.00 

876 00 

000 

000 

(52.71439) 

43.596 00 

127.184 44 

0.00 

000 

5.44069 

000 

5.46191 

000 

17.196 95 

17.749 80 

000 

113 47 

000 

00 

27.503 90 

9841 

1.66149 

37833 

10.35862 

2.047 40 

15.435 05 

38.587 98 



Reclassification 

07/01/04 INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



1.178.497 00 

24.996 00 

31.595 00 

450 00 

1 .650 00 

900 00 

1.032.328 00 
25.352.00 
260.830 00 

12.217 00 

11.016 00 



4.419 00 
600 00 



DEPART- 


TOTAL 




BALANCE 


MENTAL 


EXPEND 


OFU 


06/30/05 




59.842.60 




000 




1.118.694 57 


7.79157 


52.010.86 




2.977 34 




0.00 




25.473 84 




(477.84) 




26.61107 




000 




26.151 81 


3.057 45 


2.38574 




1,326.00 




00 




1.650 00 




0.00 




87508 




24.92 

(52.71439) 
43.596 00 




804.11912 


205.393.32 


150.000.00 




25.35200 




000 




197.284.37 


1.152.50 


62.393 13 




5.440 69 




000 




8.62578 


1.072 00 


2.519.22 




5.461.91 




000 




4,650.00 


3.086 00 


3,280 00 




17,196.95 




000 




17.74980 




000 




105.182 83 


2.424 00 


7.49717 




113.47 




000 




4.366 93 


52.07 


000 




600 00 




000 


56.335 64 


43.732 90 


6.69470 


33.411 94 




9841 




000 




81246 




849 03 




378.33 




000 




10.428.73 




23.379.22 


500 00 






2,547 40 


4.004 45 


2,638 29 




16.801 21 


148.837 04 


139.885.31 




47.539 71 



350.407 06 


000 


2.723.403 33 


00 


000 


209.677 13 


2,657.72059 


230.72361 


395.04332 


27.41820 










320,589 79 


333.175 67 




14.832 32 



27.418 20 


000 


3.611.74 


(3.611 74) 


849 60 


(849.60) 


41.196 87 




145.34449 




74.32519 




58.490 12 




60.046 86 




16.358 53 




000 




400.223 40 


(4.461.34) 


3.855 66 




3.053 84 




300 00 


(300.00) 


000 


9.126 36 


0.00 


27.544 04 


000 


4.026.25 


000 


9.54949 


000 


12.967 02 


0.00 


34.43667 



70.837 83 
257.74251 
180.067.21 
71.227.92 
12.300 00 
20.46846 
43.107 00 



333.17567 



74.798 74 
254.14257 
198771 92 

72,681 94 
1,595 90 

12.78570 

29.81650 



655.750 93 



42.501 97 

3.884 00 

493 00 

7.57309 
41.347 50 



644.093 27 

1.760.00 

32,698 40 

75.00 

2.22946 
63.985.79 



14.83232 

0.00 
000 
37.235.96 
148.944 43 
56.12048 
57.036 10 
70.750 96 
24.041 29 
13.290 50 



407.41972 

3.855 66 
1293 84 
00 
18.929.93 
31.428 04 
4.444 25 
9.549 49 
18.310.65 
10.961.91 



7.209 50 



97.34983 



8.77377 



121 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL REVENUE/GRANTS ROLLFORWARD 

JUNE 30, 2005 



FUND/TITLE 

EARLY CHILDHOOD REV 

COMMUNITY ASK REVOLVING 

PARENT TO PARENT REVOLVING 

ANDOVER BUDDY CORPS 

ALL DAY KINDERGARDEN 

EXTRA CURRICULAR REVOLVING 

PHYS ED REVOLVING 

LOST BOOKS 

STUDENT TEACHER REVOLVING 

AND/LAW COLLAB REVOLVING 

TRANSPORTATION REVOLVING 

OTHER SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS EDUCATION 

FOOD SERVICES 

OTHER SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS SCHOOL LUNCH 

SEWER RELIEF GRANT 

VETERAN'S SERVICES GIFTS 

CABLE TV COMMUNITY ACCESS 

GIFT - FIREWORKS 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY GIFT 

OLD TOWN HALL RESTORATION 

TOWN GIFT & DONATIONS 

CONSERVATION GIFT 

CONSERVATION TRAIL ACCOUNT 

DCS-GIFT 

YOUTH SERVICES GIFTS/CONTRIBUTIONS 

COA ADULT DAY CARE DONATIONS 

COA BUILDING FUND 

COA SCHOLARSHIPS 

DARE CONTRIBUTIONS 

LIBRARY GIFTS & DONATIONS 

HOME FOR THE AGED GIFT 

CHOLESTEROL SCREENING 

A19 2003 ACCUM BENEFITS 

A18 2004 ACCUM BENEFITS 

A24 2005 ACCUM BENEFITS 

BALLARDVALE HISTORIC DISTRICT 

OTHER SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 

SUB TOTAL 



BALANCE 
07/01/04 

64.309 88 
2.252 09 

12.124 27 

1.827 00 

237,48214 

28.455 18 
6.975 25 

44.446 12 

8.015 88 

1.964 60 

248,556 95 



Reclassification 

07/01/04 INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



763.629 99 



23.053 00 

1.655 69 

10.451 85 

3.000 00 

474.211 23 

46878 

2.058 94 

4.964 14 

234 85 

812 68 

16.852 55 

(36 00) 

(160 00) 

150 00 

805 23 

55.821 00 

74.016 84 

2.130 72 

250.000 00 

300.000 00 

000 

000 



DEPART- 


TOTAL 


MENTAL 


EXPEND 




104.364 79 



11.203 00 



7.488 86 



774.987 00 


715.282 58 


203.791 95 


191.90167 


5.500 00 


5.37651 


16.329 45 


18.91803 




6.97581 


1.000 00 


1.292 34 


308.170 00 


356.533 35 



73.31300 
140.876 53 



00 1,471,317 77 



978,064 74 1,051,259 76 



140.876 53 
(23.053 00) 



0,00 978.064 74 



445 00 



4.000 00 
216.263 35 



77000 
32.681 00 



2.596 82 



BALANCE 
06/30/05 

27.892 62 
2,252.09 

15.838 41 

1.827 00 

295.565 21 

40.345 46 
7.09874 

35.20524 

1.040,07 

1.672 26 

200.193 60 



748,75962 



.051.259 76 41.586 59 310,664 53 




000 




2.100 69 


7.937 25 


2.51460 


7.000 00 


000 




690.47458 




46878 


21.850 00 


1,308 94 




4.964 14 




234 85 


537 00 


1.045 68 


5.91505 


43,61850 


(36 00) 


000 


(160 00) 


000 


150 00 


000 




805 23 


48.61308 


31,332 68 


7.857 80 


68.755 86 


81348 


1,317.24 


250.000 00 


000 


19.53670 


280.463 30 




300.000 00 


389 28 


130 72 



1.335.220 86 



2.596 82 300.000 00 



1,436,804 60 



4,013 77 385,51134 4.211.292 09 



AGENCY ACCOUNTS 

MEALS TAX 

FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 

POLICE OFF DUTY 

FIRE OFF DUTY 

FIREARMS PERMITS 



(1.849 981 

(36 501 

(328.354 841 

(1.194 93 

(3 750 50 



1.084 93 


(765 05) 


7.880 00 


7.843 50 


1.534.798 50 


1.383.652 05 


59.704.50 


61.396 26 


14.662 50 


10.912 50 



0.00 

000 

(177.208,39) 

(2,886 69) 

(0.50) 



(335 186 75 




000 


00 


00 


1.618.130 43 


1 ,463.039 26 


00 


(180.095 58) 


3 311 685 30 




■i ' ' '4 18'" 


4.013 77 


385.511 34 


5.829.422.52 


9.963.089 73 


514.367.82 


3.558.917 23 



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125 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

JUNE 30, 2005 









BALANCE 










BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


July 1. 2004 


DEPOSITS 


OTHER 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


June 30. 2005 


SPRING GROVE 




851,915.77 


448.094 28 


357.369.53 


40.320 00 


10.937.24 




856.721.05 


SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 






36.661.38 






408 92 


1.475.00 


35,595.30 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 


1.000.00 


1.650.83 






60.22 




1,711.05 


EMMA J LINCOLN 


AVIS 




91742 






33.00 




95042 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




54.125 87 






1,964.57 




56.090.44 


J GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5.000 00 


7.326.97 






257.86 


1,232 62 


6,352.21 


EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 


LIBRARY 


45.000 00 


51.261 84 






1,860.59 




53.122.43 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




458.853 12 






16,654 49 




475.507.61 


A. & A V LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1.000 00 


7.494.23 






272.01 




7.76624 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5.000.00 


19,788 33 






424.07 




20.21240 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200 00 


273 08 






9.90 


15.00 


267.98 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200 00 


1.070.05 






3885 




1.108.90 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


53288 


1,256.15 






45.60 


25.00 


1.276.75 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




1.143,730 94 






41,512.72 




1,185,243.66 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


4.587 68 


463299 






168 13 


187.46 


4,613.66 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


291 71 


1.451 18 






5269 




1,503.87 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10.000 00 


39 728 02 






1.441.94 




41,169 96 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1.058 93 


14.284 59 






51846 




14,80305 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1.500 00 


2436 65 






88.44 




2,525.09 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5.766 63 


13.492 31 






289.15 




13,781.46 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600 00 


1.674 15 






60.75 


15.00 


1.719.90 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


81 95 


650 81 






23 62 




674.43 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5.000 00 


51.852.72 






764.82 


800 00 


51,817.54 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345.825 50 


345825 50 










345.825.50 


MARGARET G TOWLE 


INCOME 




104.227 05 






15.964.90 


15,312.63 


104,879 32 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




13.371 87 




17,79082 


59.56 


6.595.95 


24,626.30 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






2.925 06 






31679 




3,241.85 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598 50 


598 50 










598.50 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1 000 00 


5 483 24 






199 03 




5.682.27 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1 000 00 


12 980 25 






471.15 


15.00 


13,436.40 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300 00 


1 722 70 






62.54 




1,785.24 


TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 






7 166 39 






520 79 




7,687.18 


UNDISTRIBUTED TRUST FUNDS 






93 156 70 






1,390.00 


94.546.70 


0.00 


ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 






1 031 84 


1.44016 








2,472.00 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7 84581 


4S411 32 






1.648 26 




47,059.58 




2 996 608 33 


358.809 69 


58.110 82 


98.521.06 


120.220,36 


3.391.829.54 


INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 


















INSURANCE 


TOWN 




215083 64 






4.609.28 




219.692.92 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 




265 495 44 






4.571 48 


60,34587 


209,721 .05 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






135 191 32 


2.836.206.93 


8,325.000 00 




11.031,35891 


265.039.34 


HEALTH INSURANCE W/C DEPOSIT 




299 015 00 


90.685 00 






96,800.00 


292,900 00 


WORKERS COMPENSATION 






20 1 27 66 


109.55275 


93.889 00 




141,794.00 


81,775.41 


TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 


914 913 06 


3 036.444 68 


8.418,889 00 


9.18076 


11.330,298.78 


1,069.128.72 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 


3 931 521 39 


3395,25437 


8.476,99982 


107.701.82 


11,450,519.14 


4,460,95826 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND UNISSUED 

JUNE 30, 2005 (UPDATED 12/01/2005) 



ARTICLE PROJECT NAME 

ART 41, 1999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 

ART 44, 1999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 74, 1999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

ART 9, 2000 MIDDLE/ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (EXEMPT) 

ART 12, 2001 LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 

ART 10-1, 2002 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (ADD'L FUNDING) 

ART 1 1 , 2002 NEW SCHOOL ADDITIONAL FUNDING 

ART 12, 2002 WEST ELEMENTARY ASBESTOS REMOVAL 

ART 23, 2002 CONSERVATION FUND 

ART 48, 2002 MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 20, 2003 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 29, 2004 COLLINS/WEST MIDDLE HVAC 

ART 32, 2004 SENIOR CENTER PLANS 

ART 35, 2004 SO MAIN/ROGERS BROOK SEWER 

ART 2A, 2004 SOUTH MAIN AREA SEWERS 

ART 1 1 , 2005 SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATIONS/REPAIRS 

ART 12, 2005 SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY 

ART 33, 2005 MORAINE STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 34, 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 41 , 2005 FISHBROOK PUMPING STATION 

ART 51 2005 SIDEWALK RECONSTRUCTION 

ART 54 2005 BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION 



AUTHORIZED 


DECREASES 


AUTHORIZED 


UNISSUED 




UNISSUED 


June 30, 2005 


December 1, 2005 


December 1,2005 


8,500,000.00 


0.00 


8,500,000.00 


2,200,000.00 


0.00 


2,200,000.00 


304,000.00 


50,000.00 


254,000.00 


6,938,000.00 


3,092,000.00 


3,846,000.00 


2,000,000.00 


0.00 


2,000,000.00 


830,000.00 


250,000.00 


580,000.00 


350,000.00 


0.00 


350,000.00 


300,000.00 


0.00 


300,000.00 


500,000.00 


0.00 


500,000.00 


269,500.00 


0.00 


269,500.00 


I 2,472,000.00 


0.00 


2,472,000.00 


475,000.00 


475,000.00 


0.00 


350,000.00 


320,000.00 


30,000.00 


1,250,000.00 


0.00 


1,250,000.00 


2,500,000.00 


0.00 


2,500,000.00 


1,500,000.00 


1,000,000.00 


500,000.00 


235,000.00 


0.00 


235,000.00 


113,000.00 


113,000.00 


0.00 


; 6,500,000.00 


0.00 


6,500,000.00 


300,000.00 


0.00 


300,000.00 


858,000.00 


0.00 


858,000.00 


250,000.00 


0.00 


250,000.00 


38.994,500.00 


5,300,000.00 


33,694,500.00 



133 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUNDS 

JUNE 30, 2005 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting 
May , 2004 



Public Safety - Personal Services 41 ,785.00 

General Government - Other Expenses 7,350.00 

CD & P - Personal Services 20,202.00 

General Government - Personal Services 1 ,983.00 

Greater Lawrence Tech - Other Expenses 3,690.00 

P & F - Vehicle Maint - Other Expenses 32,800.00 

DPW - Personal Services 92,190.00 



From Taxation 



200,000.00 



Available Balance 



0.00 



200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfer by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting 
May , 2004 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



134 



OFFICIAL TOWN ELECTION RESULTS 
MARCH 22, 2005 



PRECINCT 



TOTAL 



MODERATOR (1) 



James D. Doherty 56 


63 


53 


37 


35 


35 


37 


53 


56 


425 


Blanks 5 


9 


10 


5 


2 


3 


3 


9 


4 


50 


Misc. Others 2 





1 


3 


1 





2 








9 


TOTAL 63 


72 


64 


45 


38 


38 


42 


62 


60 


484 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN (1) 


















Mary Kelvie Lyman 57 


61 


57 


37 


34 


31 


37 


53 


51 


418 


Blanks 4 


10 


7 


8 


4 


7 


5 


9 


8 


61 


Misc. Others 2 


1 




















1 


5 


TOTAL 63 


72 


64 


45 


38 


38 


42 


62 


60 


484 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE (1) 


















David S. Samuels 53 


60 


49 


41 


35 


32 


33 


54 


51 


408 


Blanks 8 


10 


12 


4 


3 


6 


9 


6 


8 


66 


Misc. Others 2 


2 


3 














2 


1 


10 


TOTAL 63 


72 


64 


45 


38 


38 


42 


62 


60 


484 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY (1) 














Francis A. O'Connor 57 


64 


53 


34 


34 


32 


39 


55 


51 


419 


Blanks 6 


7 


11 


11 


4 


6 


3 


5 


9 


62 


Misc. Others 


1 

















2 





3 


TOTAL 63 


72 


64 


45 


38 


38 


42 


62 


60 


484 



135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on February 28, 2005 the Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. 
All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and Nine are to vote at the 
Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 2005 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have 
notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house and in 
no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectmen for three years, one School Committee 
member for three years and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years. 

All of the above candidates are to be voted on one ballot. The polls will be open from seven o'clock A.M. 
to eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of 
Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to Monday, April 25, 2005, at seven o'clock 
P.M. in the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, then and there to 
begin acting upon articles that follow in this warrant. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 25, 2005 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 707 voters admitted to the meeting. 

James D. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:01 P.M. 

The opening prayer was giving by Rev. Jeffrey S. Gill, Christ Church, Central Street. 

Salute to the flag was led by Brian Major, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

Amanda Weldin, a senior at Andover High School, sang "America the Beautiful". 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit sixty-nine (69) non-voters to the meeting and escort 
non-voters to the non-voting section thereafter. 

The Virginia Cole Award Community Service Award was awarded to the following recipients: 

Alix Driscoll presented the Virginia Cole Award Community Service Award to Margaret R. Keck, 52 
Harold Parker Road. Peggy Keck has served Andover as both AVIS vice president, who has acquired and 
protected substantial areas of town, and a long-serving member of the Planning Board. 

136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

As Vice President of AVIS, which is the second oldest land trust in the country, Ms. Keck ran the land 
acquisition committee, a more than three decade commitment. Ms. Keek's knowledge of Andover and land 
conservation rules has made possible new reservations and additions to the more than two dozen AVIS 
reservations. 

Ms. Keck also served on the Planning Board for many years overseeing the strengthening of zoning rules to 

preserve Andover neighborhoods and bolstering a strong downtown, using the Master Plan. 

A firm believer in connections between neighborhoods she urged trails and paths be built as good public policy 

In 1967, she was a prime mover behind the first bonding article, $250,000, for the Andover Conservation 
Commission to purchase and set aside land. The Foster property at Pomps Pond, land around Hussey's Pond in 
Shawsheen Square, Wood Hill in West Andover and Pole Hill in Ballardvale, and Essex Sand and Gravel came 
under town's protection in this first article. 

Susan Stott presented the Virginia Cole Award Community Service Award to Nathaniel B. Smith, 
21 Phillips Street. Nat Smith has been president of AVIS since 1970. This spring Mr. Smith will retire 
from AVIS and also from Phillips Academy, where he has taught Math since 1965. 

Mr. Smith initiated and supervised the first major AVIS boardwalk between Indian Ridge and the West 
Parish Meadow, linking the two reservations. Mr. Smith is responsible for reproducing the AVIS map, as 
well for making all the familiar wooden signs at the entrance to each AVIS reservation. 

Under Mr. Smith's leadership, AVIS developed a network of wardens who care for its reservations, a 
maintenance team to care for the trails and boardwalks and a land acquisition committee, which has 
expanded the open space protected by AVIS. Mr. Smith also played the key role in the acquisition of the 
West Parish Meadow in 1995. 

Brian Major, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, presented the Virginia Cole Award Community 
Service Award to James D. Doherty, 9 Juniper Road. Mr. Doherty has served the Town over 70 years 
in a variety of capacities: Recreation Supervisor. Co-Chair of the 350 th Committee, Businessman, 
Kiwanian, Merrimack College Volunteer and St. Augustine's Church Leader. The post for which he will 
always be remembered is Town Moderator. This year marks his 29 th consecutive year in this position. 

Mr. Doherty has been a participant in the educational, business, political, spiritual and volunteer life of the 
Town of Andover for just about all of his near-90 year life. 

• A 1933 Graduate of Punchard High School 

• 12 years working in the Andover Recreation Department between 1934 and 1950 

• 20+ years Umpiring Andover Little League Baseball 

• 20 years as Chairman of the Town Democratic Committee 

• Nearly 70 years as Owner of Doherty Insurance - a business that he and his brother Bill started in 
1937 

• Elected in 1977, 29 consecutive years as Andover' s Town Moderator 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading 
of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to 

the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator introduced Mark Merritt the Town Meeting "Ombudsman" and reminded meeting 
members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to 
articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and procedures of the meeting to the meeting participants and 
announced that pro and con microphones would be used when appropriate during the meeting. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectmen for three years, one School Committee 
members for three years, one Andover Housing Committee Member for five years. 

All candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 22, 2005. The Polls were open from 7:00 
A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 



Moderator 



Board of Selectmen 



School Committee 



For One Year 

One For Three years 

One For Three Years 



James D. Doherty 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 
David S. Samuels 



Andover Housing Authority One For Five Years Francis A. O'Connor 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to elect Edward Cole, 43 River Street, be elected 
Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the elected 
Town Officers be established as follows: 



Town Moderator - 

Selectmen - 
School Committee 



$250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 

Chairman -$1,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

Chairman -$1,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 



The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary, 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 



138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise and 
appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, 
including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1 , 2005 
and ending June 30, 2006 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 
ARTICLE 4 - 2005 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority' Vote. 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,009,946 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,093,929 
TOTAL 3,103,875 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,246,213 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 117,880 
TOTAL including 6,000 from wetland filing fees and 64,000 from 

closeout of Title V revolving fund. 1,364,093 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
COMMUNITY SERVICES/YOUTH SERVICES 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 651,477 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 270,650 
TOTAL including 517,000 and 38,700 in receipts from Community 

Services and Youth Services programs and activities. 922,127 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
ELDER SERVICES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 621,201 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 147,933 
TOTAL including 55,000 in federal grants, 45,000 in other grants, 

and 102,000 in meals donations, senior connections receipts 

and newsletter ads. 769,134 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
PLANT & FACILITIES 



139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,809,817 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 1,213,412 
TOTAL including 110,552 in rental receipts, 10,000 from perpetual 

care income, and 43,000 from cemetery fees. 4,023,229 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

11 PERSONAL SERVICES 11,152,761 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 1,009,825 
TOTAL including 141,934 in parking receipts, 60,000 in detail 

fees, and 850,000 in ambulance collections. 12,162,586 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
PUBLIC WORKS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,466,581 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 3,604,250 
TOTAL 5,070,831 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

SEWER 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 358,314 

16 OTHER EXPENSES 1,663,000 
TOTAL 2,021,314 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

WATER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,653,455 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 2,178,725 
TOTAL 3,832,180 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

LIBRARY 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,834,166 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 530,680 
TOTAL 2,364,846 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES 

21 COMPENSATION FUND 695,000 

22 RESERVE FUND 200,000 
TOTAL 895,000 



140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

23 PERSONAL SERVICES 40,551,500 

24 OTHER EXPENSES 10,788,711 
TOTAL including 200,000 in insurance receipts and 150,000 

from state circuit breaker reserves. 51,340,211 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

25 GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENT 183,493 

TOTAL 183,493 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 
FIXED EXPENSES 

26 DEBT SERVICE 12,111,907 

27 STABILIZATION FUND 

28 GENERAL INSURANCE 761,134 

29 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

30 RETIREMENT FUND 3,961,248 

31 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 9,347,000 
TOTAL 26,181,289 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

GRAND TOTAL $ 1 1 4,234,208 

less dedicated Revenues (2,393,186) 
NET TOTAL $ 1 1 1 ,841 ,022 



ARTICLE 4 - 2005 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
SPECIAL ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 



Article 8 



Free Cash FY 2006 



$876,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 



Article 7 FY2005 Public Works - Other Expenses (snow removal) 
Article 9 Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 

(from One time Lottery Distribution) 
Article 24 Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 
Article 27 Fireworks 



TOTAL 



$200,000.00 
$153,377.00 

$300,000.00 

$9,000.00 

$662,377.00 



141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 
SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from FY 2005 Budget: 
Article 6 Article 4 2004 ATM - FY 2005 Retirement Fund $138,109.00 



and be appropriated to the following: 
FY 2005 Health Insurance Budget 

Article 57 Article 4 ATM 2002 - Plant & Facilities Capital Projects Fund 
and be appropriated to the following: 
Repairs to Lewis Street DPW and Plant & Facilities Buildings 



$138,109.00 
$150,000.00 
$150,000.00 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



Article 10H Article 26, 1995 Field Improvements 

Article 47, 1996 Shawsheen Field Improvements 
Article 16, 1999 - Public Safety Center 

TOTAL 



$384,000.00 

$4,000.00 

$552.00 

$388,552.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 11 School Building Renovations 

Article 12 School Safety & Security 

Article 33 Moraine Street Safety Improvements 

Article 34 Water Treatment Plant Improvements 

Article 41 Fish Brook Pump Station Improvements 

Article 51 Sidewalk Reconstruction 

Article 54 Bridge Repairs 



$1,500,000.00 
$235,000.00 
$113,000.00 

$6,500,000.00 

$300,000.00 

$858,000.00 

$250,000.00 

TOTAL $9,756,000.00 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 



Article 9 Transfer of Funds From the Following Warrant Articles: 



West Fire Station Study $40,000.00 

Library HVAC Improvements $37,219.51 

Plant & Facilities CIP Fund $13,765.99 

Plant & Facilities - Other Expenses $1 8,460.33 

TOTAL $109,445.83 

to be appropriated to the following : 

Spring Grove Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund $109,445.83 



Article 33, 2001 ATM 
Article 34, 2002 ATM 
Article 4, 2003 ATM 
Article 4, 2003 ATM 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53^g REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Article 14 A Community Development and Planning Department $40,000.00 

Article 14 B Memorial Hall Library -Lost Damaged Materials $20,000.00 

Article 14 C Health Clinic $20,000.00 

Article 14 D Division of Community Services $260,000.00 

Article 14 E Division of Youth Services $175,000.00 

Article 14 F Field Maintenance $50,000.00 

Article 14 G Division of Elder Services $200,000.00 

Article 14 H Public Safety $50,000.00 

Article 14 I Memorial Hall Library Audio/Visual $36,000.00 

TOTAL $851,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 



Article 5 Capital Projects Fund 

Article 39 Elderly & Disabled Transportation Program 



TOTAL 



$2,077,000.00 

$12,000.00 

$2,089,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER & WATER RESERVES 



Article 36 Transfer funds from Water Reserves 
and appropriate to: 
Water Distribution Improvements 

Article 55 Transfer funds from Water Reserves 
and appropriate to: 
MA Salt Study 



$250,000.00 

$250,000.00 

$20,000.00 

$20,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM CONSERVATION FUND 



NONE 



143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Article 38 Transfer funds from Overlay Surplus $670,623.50 
and appropriate to the following overlay accounts: 

FY 2003 $313,659.02 

FY 2004 $356,964.48 

TOTAL $670,623.50 

A true record 
ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

Brian Major, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, presented a status report of previously approved Town 
projects. Mr. Major reported on the sewer projects, Water Treatment Plant project, Public Safety Center 
completion, West Elementary School asbestos removal project, and the privately funded WWII Veterans 
Memorial dedicated on Memorial Day 2004. Other projects that were competed and reported were: the 
Library HVCA project, Red Spring Road retaining wall, the Olde Andover Village Parking lot, Town 
Yard roof replacements, Bancroft Elementary School bathroom improvements, the High School Elevator 
upgrade, Town and School Building - Radio fire alarm call boxes and the Andover High School track 
resurfacing and re-striping project. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,177,000 for 
the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2006 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was NOTED that the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $2,077,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal 2006 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the 2004 
Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town transfer the sum of $138,109 from 
Article 4, 2004 Annual Town Meeting - FY2005 Retirement Fund budget and appropriate $138,109 to the 
FY2005 Health Insurance budget by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 2004 Annual Town Meeting or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer from free cash the sum of $200,000 and 
appropriate to the FY2005 Public Works - Other Expenses to supplement the budget for snow and ice 
removal and control costs by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash to 
reduce the Fiscal Year 2006 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2005 Annual Town Meeting. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to permit the Assessors to use $876,000 in free 
cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 2006 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2005 Annual Town 
Meeting by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the 
treasury. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the town transfer $109,445.83 from the 
following unexpended appropriations: 

Article 33, 2001 West Fire Station-Long term Study $ 40,000.00 

Article 34, 2002 Library HV AC Improvements 37,219.51 

Article 4,2003 Plant & Facilities CIP Fund 13,765.99 

Article 4,2003 Plant & Facilities Other Expenses 18,460.33 

and $153,377 from free cash available for appropriation from a one-time State Aid Lottery distribution 
and appropriate the sum of $262,822.83 to Spring Grove Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund for 
reimbursement of principal funds expended from said fund. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles or take any other action 
related thereto: 



145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to 
apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to 
Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under any State or Federal 
grant program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with the 
Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the construction and 
maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 
as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for Fiscal 
Year 2006 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 5 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of Schools to solicit 
and award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five years, including any renewal, 
extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of 
the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to 
accept grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions 
the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 
146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

G. Granting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to 
grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board and the 
Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

H. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town Meetings or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Motion 1 : Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
approve the consent agenda, Articles 10A through 10G. 

Motion 2: Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town 
approve Article 10H to rescind the following unissued bond authorizations: 

Article 26, 1995 Field Improvements $ 384,000 

Article 47, 1996 Shawsheen Field Improvements 4,000 

Article 16, 1999 Public Safety Center 552 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1,500,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
school building reconstruction and renovation and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1,500,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of school reconstruction and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

Article 1 1 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $235,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
purchasing and installing security cameras, remote lock systems, keyless lock sets and an access control 
system for all of the Town's School buildings, including the Town's School Administration Building, and 
for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 Clause (9) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $235,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of purchasing and installing security cameras, remote lock systems, keyless lock 
sets, and an access control system for all of the Town's school buildings, including the Town's school 
administration building, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to 
meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

Article 12 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay 
unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 13 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary easements 
by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction or any other 
federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 14 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Article 14 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for certain Town 
departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 2005 or take any other action related thereto: 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-2006 Limit 


A. Community 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 


Applicant Fees 


$40,000 


Development & 




hearing notice 






Planning 




expenses for permit 






Department 




applications 






B. Memorial 


MHL Director 


Replacement of 


Restitution 


$20,000 


Hall Library- 




lost/damaged library 


payments 




Lost/Damaged 




materials 


/charges to 




Materials 






borrower or 
patron 




C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 


Clinic supplies and 


Clinic participant 


$20,000 




Director 


other expenses 


fees 




D. Division of 


Community 


Trips, ticket sales 


Participant fees 


$260,000 


Community 


Services Director 


and special 






Services 




programs and 
activities 






E. Division of 


Youth Services 


All programs and 


Participant fees 


$175,000 


Youth Services 


Director 


activities expenses, 
part-time help 






F. Field 


Plant and Facilities 


Field maintenance, 


Field rental fees 


$50,000 


Maintenance 


Director 


upgrade and related 
expenses 






G. Division of 


Elder Services 


Senior programs, 


Participant fees 


$200,000 


Elder Services 


Director 


classes and 
activities 






H. Public Safety 


Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 
purchase of public 
safety radio and 
antennae equipment 


Lease agreements 
for antenna users 


$50,000 


I. Memorial 


MHL Director 


Purchase of 


Rental of 


$36,000 


Hall Library 




audio/visual 


audio/visual 




Audio/Visual 




materials 


materials 





On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 15 A through I, Revolving Accounts, 
be approved as printed in the warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
Legislature for special legislation for the creation of a Solid Waste and Recycling Trust Fund for the 
Town of Andover. All proceeds from the sale or disposal of solid waste and recycling materials, and the 
balance of the Town's Tip Fee Stabilization Fund and any other funds received from the dissolution of the 
North East Solid Waste Committee, shall be deposit into said fund. The Town Treasurer shall be the 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

custodian of said fund and may invest the proceeds as provided for by Section 54 of Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws. Any interest or dividends shall be added to and become part of said fund. The Treasurer 
shall report annually on said fund in the Annual Town Report. Any Annual or Special Town Meeting of 
said Town may appropriate by majority vote from said fund to pay any of the Town's financial obligations 
associated with solid waste and recycling, or for any other lawful purpose by two-thirds vote, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 6 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 16 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote 

VOTE: YES: 242 NO: 258 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to create a Solid Waste and Recycling Stabilization Fund for 
the purpose of paying solid waste and recycling costs including costs incidental and related thereto, and to 
see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available funds and appropriate to the Solid 
Waste and Recycling Stabilization Fund all in accordance with MGL Chapter 40, Section 5B, as amended 
by Chapter 46, Sections 14 and 50 of the Acts of 2003, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 17 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from and appropriate the balance of the 
Town's Tip Fee Stabilization Fund and any other funds received from the dissolution of the North East 
Solid Waste Committee, to be used with other funds to be provided by gift, grant or otherwise for the 
purpose of constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a youth center, and for other costs incidental 
and related to the project and its financing, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Brayden Hass, Andover Youth Action Council, and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 18 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain, to 
be held in the care, custody and control of the Conservation Commission, the following parcels of land, 
which were purchased by the Town for conservation purposes; and to award no damages for said eminent 
domain takings; or take any action related thereto. 

Parcel 1 . 226 Andover Street 

That certain parcel of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, bounded and described as 
follows: 

That certain parcel of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, containing 4.232 acres 
(184,337 square feet), more or less, shown as ParcerZB on Plan of Land entitled "Plan of Land in 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Andover, MA, property of 230 Andover Street, LLC & Shawsheen Rubber Co., Inc." Scale 1"=5, dated 
August 18, 2004, drawn by Donohoe and Parkhurst, Inc. recorded at North Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan No. 14899. 

Parcel 2. 226 Andover Street 

That certain parcel of land in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, containing 1.000 acres 
(43,560 square feet) more or less, as shown as Parcel 2A on Plan of Land entitled "Plan of Land in 
Andover, MA, property of 230 Andover Street LLC & Shawsheen Rubber Co., Inc.," Scale 1' -50', dated 
August 18, 2004, drawn by Donohoe and Parkhurst, Inc., recorded at North Essex Registry of Deeds as 
Plan No. 14899. 

Parcel 3. 15 Pettingill Road 

A certain lot of land with the buildings thereon situated in that part of Andover called West 
Andover and being lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17 and 18 on a plan of land in said West Andover 
surveyed by O.F. Osgood, C.E., dated September 1888, and recorded with North District Essex Registry 
of Deeds, Plan No. 0106, to which plan reference may be made for a more particular description. 

Parcel 4. 33 Oriole Drive 

The land in said Andover being shown as Lot numbered seven (7) on plan of land entitled: 
"Subdivision and Acceptance Plan of Land in Andover, Owned by Fred W. Doyle" drawn by Andover 
Engineers, Inc., dated October 1956, recorded with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 3449, said 
premises being substantially bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHERLY: By Oriole Road, one hundred fifty (150) feet; 

WESTERLY: By a stone wall and an old roadway on four courses, totaling four hundred 

fifteen (84/100) (415.84) feet; 

NORTHERLY: By lot numbered ten (10), sixty feet; and 

EASTERLY: By lot numbered eight (8), four hundred four and 39/100 (404.39) feet. 

Together with any and all rights in and to the old roadway lying to the West of the above within 
conveyed premises to its Northerly boundary. 

Or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Town Counsel 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 19 be approved as printed in the 

Warrant. 

Article 19 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept Great Heron Place as a public way and authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, or otherwise any fee, easement or 
other interest in land known as Great Heron Place as shown on a plan entitled "SUBDIVISION PLAN OF 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. OF GREAT HERON PLACE", dated Dec. 3, 1986 as prepared by Dana 
F. Perkins & Assoc., Inc. and recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan # 10646 and on file 
in the Office of the Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment 
for said acquisition, or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Division 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 20 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Article 20 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the 
following six (6) streets: Douglass Lane, Hitchcock Farm Road, Jordyn Lane, Mortimer Drive, Stirling 
Street and Whittemore Terrace as further described below: 

A. Douglass Lane and Mortimer Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board 
entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, Douglass Crossing", dated March 31, 
1997 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 13137; 

B. Hitchcock Farm Road, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, Hitchcock Farm Road", dated December 23, 1987 
and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 11191; 

C. Jordyn Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled "DEFiNTIVE 
PLAN SUDIVISION, JORDYN LANE ESTATES IN ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS (Essex 
County)", dated August 4, 2000 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 13969; 

D. Stirling Street and Whittemore Terrace, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board 
entitled "DEFINTIVE SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND, STIRLING WOODS, ANDOVER 
MASSACHUSETTS", dated January 20, 1998 and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 13424; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Douglas Lane and 
Mortimer Drive be accepted as Public Ways as printed in the Warrant and that Hitchcock Farm Road, 
Jordyn Lane, Stirling Street and Whittemore Terrace be WITHDRAWN. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in altering 
the layout of Chandler Road and Chongris Circle as nublic ways, as shown on plan of land entitled "Street 
Alteration Plan, Chongris Circle & Chandler Road, TQidover, Massachusetts, prepared for Woodhill 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Construction Co., Inc., scale 1' -40', dated 3/8/04," drawn by MHF Design Consultants, Inc., which plan 
is on file with the Town Clerk, and in connection therewith, accepting those parcels of land shown on said 
plan as Parcels A, C, and D, to be conveyed to the Town for road widening purposes, and to pay no 
monetary consideration therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that we approve Article 22 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a renewal 
of the lease between the Town and the United States of America, Federal Aviation Administration, of land 
at the Town of Andover Water Treatment Plant, for the purpose of maintaining an Outer Marker and a 
Compass Locator Antenna servicing the Lawrence Municipal Airport, for a term of up to five years, on 
terms and conditions the Board deems in the best interest of the Town or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that we approve Article 23 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $400,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account for funding 
accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities upon being eligible for retirement under the Andover 
Contributory Retirement System and terminating employment with the Town, or take any action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 24 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $300,000 from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to 
enter into an Agreement or Agreements with the City of Lowell and the Town of Tewksbury to provide 
water services to users of those services on the property located at 459 River Road, in the Town of 
Andover, and being more specifically identified as Lot 5 on Assessors Map 229, on terms and conditions 
deemed by the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to be in the best interests of the Town, including a 
term of up to twenty-five (25) years, but with specific condition that the use of the land to be served by 
said water shall be limited to ten (10) single family homes, and the two existing buildings known as the 
Christian Formation Center and the Franciscan Friary, and that the use of the existing buildings shall be 

limited to religious, educational or charitable non-profit uses, and expressly prohibiting any other uses 
such as restaurants, nightclubs, gaming or retail, and that the owner(s) of the property shall record a 
restriction concerning the allowed uses at the Registry of Deeds; also gallons restrictions will be placed on 
each property as follows: one the 10 single family homes - 5.240 gallons, for the Christian Formation 
Center - 8,000 gallons and for the Franciscan Friary- 7,800 gallons; and that the Selectmen are 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

authorized to accept such restriction on terms and conditions they deem in the best interest of the Town or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Robert McCabe and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Town authorize the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to enter into an Agreement or Agreements with the City of Lowell and 
the Town of Tewksbury to provide water services to users of those services on the property located at 459 
River Road, in the Town of Andover, and being more specifically identified as Lot 5 on Assessors Map 
229, on terms and conditions deemed by the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to be in the best 
interests of the Town, including a term of up to twenty-five (25) years, but with specific condition that the 
use of the land to be served by said water shall be limited to ten (10) single family homes, and the two 
existing buildings known as the Christian Formation Center and the Franciscan Friary, and that the use of 
the existing buildings shall be limited to religious, educational or charitable non-profit uses, and expressly 
prohibiting any other uses such as restaurants, nightclubs, gaming or retail, and that the owner(s) of the 
property shall record a restriction acceptable to the Selectmen concerning the allowed uses at the Registry 
of Deeds, including a Deed Restriction providing that no comprehensive permits pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40B shall be sought, allowed, permitted or pursed; and also per day 
gallons restrictions will be placed on each property as follows: on the 10 single family homes 5,240 
gallons, for the Christian Formation Center 8,000 gallons and for the Franciscan Friary 7,800 gallons with 
a total daily flow not to exceed 21,040 gallons per day; and also on condition that the Christian Formation 
Center shall be occupied and used by Mellmark New England, Inc., and that the Selectmen are authorized, 
but not required, to accept such restrictions on terms and conditions they deem in the best interest of the 
Town. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 9:50 P.M., until Tuesday, April 
26, 2005 at 7:00 P.M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 26, 2005 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed seven hundred and sixty-eight (768) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:02 P.M. by James D. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit sixty-seven (67) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading 
of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to 
the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Mark Merritt and reminded voters that he would help them 
with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to articles. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

The Moderator outlined the rules and procedures of Town Meeting and announced that pro and con 
microphones would be used when appropriate during the meeting. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition the legislature to 
amend the Town's Charter by adding at the end of the first sentence of Section 5 the words "except the 
Audit Committee", or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 26 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 26 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $9,000 for a Fireworks Program 
as part of the Fourth of July Program from available funds or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Gerald H. Silverman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 27 be approved in the amount of 
$9,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $7,650,000 for the 
purpose of paying costs of constructing a Senior Center on the parcel of Town-owned land located at 56 
Bartlet Street, including the costs of plans, project administration, site development, parking, utilities, 
original equipment, furnishings, parking and circulation improvements to the adjacent municipal campus 
containing the Town Offices, School Administration and Doherty Middle School Buildings and for the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
necessary easements by gift, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise; and that to meet this 
appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore; provided however, that no amounts 
shall be borrowed or expended hereunder unless and until the Town shall have voted at a Town Election 
to exempt the amounts required to pay any bonds or notes authorized by this vote from the provisions of 
Proposition 214, so-called, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Senior Center Task Force 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $7,650,000 be and hereby is 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of constructing a Senior Center on the parcel of Town-owned 
land located at 56 Bartlet Street, including the costs of plans, project administration, site development, 
parking, utilities, original equipment, furnishings, parking and circulation improvements to the adjacent 
municipal campus containing the Town Offices, School Administration, and Doherty Middle School 
Buildings and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; that the Board of 
Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to acquire ah^necessary easements for this project by gift, by 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise; that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore; provided however, that no amounts shall be borrowed 
or expended hereunder unless and until the Town shall have voted at a Town Election to exempt the 
amounts required to pay any bonds or notes authorized by this vote from the provisions of Proposition 
2Vi, so-called. 

Article 28 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 451 NO: 249 A 2/3 vote required 

A recount was requested by 7 registered voters 

Article 28 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 449 NO: 250 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, control and management of a 
parcel of land containing 28,340 square feet more or less shown as Parcel A on a plan entitled "Exhibit 
Plan of Land in Andover, MA" by Hancock Survey Associates, Inc. dated January 20, 2005 to the Board 
of Selectmen for municipal purposes, said plan being on file in the Office of the Town Clerk, and if a 
Senior Center is not built on said property, then the land shall revert back to the School Committee, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Senior Center Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 29 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School Committee to grant, and the Board 
of Selectmen to accept, any and all easements in and across real property at Doherty Middle School in 
order to construct and operate a Senior Center, including but not limited to easements for drainage, 
utilities, access, grading and communications or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Senior Center Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 30 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4.1.3. (Exceptions and Special 
Requirements) of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by adding a new section 4.1.3.5. as follows: 

"5. Municipal Senior Center. Land and structures used for a municipal senior center are exempt from the 
lot area, frontage, building setback and off-street parking and loading requirements of this bylaw." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

3 156 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

On request of the Senior Center Task Force 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 31 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 9.4. 8. c. (Major Non-Residential Projects) 
of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by deleting "j" at the end of the sentence and replacing therewith the letter 
"k" and to see if the Town will vote to amend Section 9.5.4.3. (Procedure for Site Plan Certificate of 
Approval) of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by adding the following: 

"k. provisions for landscaping and adequate screening and buffering." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 32 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Article 32 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1 13,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
constructing sidewalks along the west side of Moraine Street, the relocation of the entrance driveway 
from Moraine Street to the High School track/football field area, the construction of an additional parking 
area on the east side of the road opposite the softball field, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, 
Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1 13,000 be and hereby is 
appropriated for the purpose of paying costs of constructing sidewalks along the west side of Moraine 
Street, the relocation of the entrance driveway from Moraine Street to the High School track/football field 
area, and the construction of an additional parking area on the east side of the road opposite the softball 
field, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this 

appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 33 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval ^ 7 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $6,500,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
constructing two filter units, underdrain retrofit of existing six filters and replacement of the backwash 
pumping system at the Water Treatment Plant and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 Clauses (4) and (7C) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to appropriate $6,500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing two filter units, underdrain retrofit of existing six filters and replacement of the 
backwash pumping system at the Water Treatment Plant and for the payment of all other costs incidental 
and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 Clauses (4) and (7C) 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 34 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to rezone Assessor Parcel 18- 103 A on Assessor Map 18 
from Industrial D to Office Park or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Town rezone Assessor Parcel 1 8- 103 A on 
Assessor Map 18 from Industrial D to Office Park or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 35 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: A 2/3 vote was required and was not obtained, as declared by Moderator. 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $250,000 from water reserves and 
appropriate $250,000 for the purpose of replacing and/or cleaning old water mains including costs 
incidental and related or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of $250,000 

from water reserves and appropriate $250,000 for the purpose of replacing and/or cleaning old water 

mains including costs incidental and related thereto. 

158 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw pursuant to Section 2.3 
(District Boundaries) and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map on Andover, Mass. to re-zone 
to Single Family Residence A (SRA) from Industrial D District (ID) all of the remaining portion not 
currently zoned SRA of those parcels of land situated on the northerly side of Fleming Avenue being 
more particularly shown as Lot A and Lot B on a Plan of Land entitled "Subdivision & Acceptance Plan, 
Raytheon Park, Raytheon Mfg. Co., December 1963 Stowers Associates, Reg. Land Surveyors, Methuen, 
Mass." recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 4975 (a copy of which is on file 
with the Office of the Town Clerk). Said parcels of land being a portion of Lot 4A on Town of Andover's 
Assessor's Map 35 or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Andover Mills LLC and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 37 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 37 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: A 2/3 vote was required and was not obtained, as declared by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from Overlay Surplus and 
appropriate to various fiscal years' Allowance for Abatements and Exemptions accounts or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Chief Assessor 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer the sum 
of $670,623.50 from Overlay Surplus to the following overlay accounts: 

FY2003S 313,659.02 
FY2004 $ 356,964.48 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to exceed 
$12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled transportation subsidy 
program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 39 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $12,000 from Taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law, Section 3.1.3. Table 
of Use Regulations, Appendix A. Table 1., Sections D.l. and 2. in the Industrial Districts by deleting the 
existing language under D.l . and D.2. for the Industrial Districts and replacing therewith the following: 

159 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 



P. Manufacturing and Industrial Uses IG IA ID 

1 . Laboratory for research and development work, Y Y N 
or establishment engaged in general manufacturing 

or other industrial work including fabrication, assembly, 
and uses accessory thereto generally characterized by or 
involving activities conducted outside of enclosed structures. 

2. Laboratory for research and development work; Y Y Y 
or establishment engaged in specialized manufacturing, 

including fabrication and assembly, associated with computers, 
computer peripheral equipment, electronics, information 
systems and devices, communications and telecommunications, 
precision instruments, medical devices and equipment, 
pharmaceuticals, biologies and drugs, and uses accessory thereto 
including training activities, provided that all activities shall be 
conducted within enclosed structures. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 40 be approved as printed in Warrant. 

Article 40 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $300,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
plans and design for the construction of a new extension pump building and wetwell and for the payment 
of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 8 Clause (4) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate $300,000 for the purpose 
of paying costs of plans and design for the construction of a new extension pump building and wetwell 
and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8 Clause (4) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 41 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the. Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 9:55 P.M., until Monday, May 2, 
2005 at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 2, 2005 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed three hundred and fourteen (314) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by James D. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-three (23) non-voters to the meeting and to escort 
non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading 
of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to 
the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Mark Merritt and reminded voters that he would help them 
with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and procedures of Town Meeting and announced that pro and con 
microphones would be used when appropriate during the meeting. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law Section 5.2.10.3., 
Signs in the General Business District, by inserting after the first sentence, the text "In lieu of a 
freestanding sign, a projecting sign, excluding the sign structure, not to exceed nine square feet is 
permitted. The projecting sign shall be at least eight feet above the ground, and the top of the sign shall 
be no more than twenty feet from the ground level to the top of the sign." and by adding the following 
definition to Section 10 "PROJECTING SIGN: A sign which is affixed to a building, is perpendicular to a 
building and extends horizontally no more than five feet beyond the surface to which it is affixed. No 
sign shall project vertically above the eave line of the roof." or take any other action related thereto. 



On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 42 be approved as printed in Warrant. 

Article 42 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

161 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the following sections in the Andover Zoning By- 
law: Section 5.2.14.2.b. by deleting the text "Overhanging signs should be used only in such 
circumstances as on side streets where overhanging positioning is necessary for visibility from a major 
street.", and Section 5.2.1 1.3. by replacing the text "Overhanging signs" with the text "Projecting signs", 
and Section 5.2.10.2. by deleting the text "or projecting from it.", and Section 5.2.10.2. by replacing the 
text "an overhanging sign" with the text "a projecting sign" or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 43 be approved as printed in Warrant. 

Article 43 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law Section 5.2.1 1., Signs 
in the Mixed Use District, by adding the following subsection "8. Use of internally illuminated signs is 
prohibited." or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 44 be approved as printed in Warrant. 

Article 44 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law Section 5.2.4.5., 
Prohibited Signs or Devices, by replacing the text "No animated, revolving or flashing sign shall be 
permitted." with "No animated, revolving, flashing, neon or similar gaseous tube illuminated signs shall 
be permitted." or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
By-law Section 5.2.4.5., Prohibited Signs or Devices, by replacing the text "No animated, revolving or 
flashing sign shall be permitted." with "No animated, revolving, flashing, exposed neon or similar 
exposed gaseous tube illuminated signs shall be permitted." 

Article 45 was approved 

The vote was declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

A count was called by seven voting members: 

1 zro 

Article 45 was approved 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

VOTE: YES: 139 NO: 27 A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law 5.2.8., Signs in 
Residential Districts, by adding the following subsection "1. Not more than two contractor signs, each not 
to exceed twelve square feet, maintained on the premises while construction is in process and containing 
information relevant to the project. Such sign shall not be located closer than twenty-five feet from the 
edge of the roadway and shall be securely anchored. No part of any such sign or its structure shall be 
more than five feet above the ground. Such sign shall be removed within thirty days after completion of 
construction." and by adding the following definition to Section 10 "CONTRACTOR SIGN: A temporary 
sign identifying the contractor's pertinent information, intended to be displayed only in association with 
the construction, remodeling, or repair of a building or structure." or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town WITHDRAW Article 46 by a 
Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law Section 5.2.4., 
Prohibited Signs and Devices, by adding the following subsection: "8. No A-frame signs, except as 
provided for in 5.2.6.5. Temporary A-frame Sign Permit, shall be allowed in any zoning district." and by 
inserting the following definition to Section 10 "A-FRAME SIGN: A self-supporting, double-paneled, 
temporary sign, which panels are connected along one (1) edge and separated along the opposite edge." or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
By-law Section 5.2.4., Prohibited Signs and Devices, by adding the following subsection: "8. No A-frame 
signs, except as provided for in 5.2.6.5. Temporary A-frame Sign Permit, shall be allowed in any zoning 
district." and by inserting the following definition to Section 10 "A-FRAME SIGN: A self supporting, 
temporary sign or device including, but not limited to, signs in the shape of an.A, signs in the shape of a 
T, signs in the shape of an H, and other frames that are self supporting." 

Article 47 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law Section 5.2.6., 
Temporary Signs, by adding the following subsection "5. Temporary A-frame Sign Permit. The Building 
Inspector may issue a permit for the temporary placement of a freestanding A-frame sign which (i) 
announces a performance, an event, or is for directional purposes; ii) must be securely anchored so as to 
not blow over and is professional in appearance; iii) must be removed at the close of each business day 
and at the expiration of the permit; iv) may not obstruct a public or private walkway, or be placed on 
public property. The maximum area shall not exceed eight (8) square feet on each side, and a maximum 
height of five (5) feet above the ground. The tempoV&ry permit may impose limiting conditions, including 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

among other matters the number allowed at each business property location." or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 48 be approved as printed in Warrant. 

Article 48 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, by transfer from available funds or by 
any combination thereto and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of study, 
recommendation(s) and implementation of said recommendation(s) of the periodic home flooding/ 
surcharging of drainage system affecting Burnham Road, Enmore Street, Arundel Street, Argyle Street, 
Carisbrooke Street, York Street and Balmoral Street and, including costs incidental and related thereto 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent 
domain and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, 
Sections 7 & 8 as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefore or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark Pacocha and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town WITHDRAW Article 49 by a 
Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw by inserting the 
number "2" in the section reference number approved under Article 39 at the 2004 Annual Town 
Meeting. The correct reference number will read: "4.1.3.2.b." instead of "4.1.3. b." or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 48 be approved as printed in Warrant. 



Article 50 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $858,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
reconstructing sidewalks within the Town as more fully described in the Fiscal Year 2006 portion of the 
Town's Sidewalk Master Plan, so-called, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $858,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of reconstructing sidewalks within the Town as more fully described in the fiscal 
year 2006 CIP request titled Reconstruction of Existing Sidewalks, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote to close debate. 

Article 51 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $1 10,000 from off-street parking 
receipts and appropriate $1 10,000 for the purpose of purchasing and installing a pay-and-display unit at 
Olde Andover Village, Shawsheen Square and Memorial Hall Library parking lots, an electric vehicle 
replacement for parking enforcement, pay and display shelters and a message board, including costs 
incidental and related or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $25,000 
from off-street parking receipts and appropriate $25,000 for the purpose of purchasing and installing a pay 
and display unit and shelter at Shawsheen Square, including costs incidental and related thereto." 

Article 52 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw by inserting the 
following: 

I. Amend Section 10.0. Definitions, by replacing the definition of "Independent Living Residence" 
as follows: 

INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE: A dwelling unit, either constructed or converted, which is 
intended for use and occupancy by persons who have achieved the age of fifty-five (55) years or older 
within the meaning of M.G.L. Chapter 15 IB, Section 4, Subsection 7 and 42 U.S.C. 3607(b)(2)(C). A 
development that contains such units shall be operated and maintained in all other respects in compliance 
with the requirements of the statutes above and regulations promulgated thereunder, and such 
development that contains such units may include common areas, a common dining facility, and a 
meeting space for the provision of social, psychological, recreational and educational programs. 

II. Amend Appendix A, Table 1, Section 3.1.3 Table of Use Regulations, A.5.d, under SRC, to 
change the designation from "N" to "PB". 



III. Amend Section 7.4 Elderly Housing as follows: 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Replace Section 7.4.4 with: To provide alternative housing options for a maturing population that 
require lower demands on Town services and lower burdens of property maintenance on residents. 

Amend Section 7.4 by adding: 8. To help maintain a stable economy by preventing out-migration 
of residents who are an essential part of our community. 

Amend Section 7.4 by adding: 9. To promote flexibility in land use planning in order to improve 
site layouts and protect natural features and environmental values. 

Amend Section 7.4.8. Independent Living Residence - Dimensional Requirements and Design 
Standards by replacing the section in its entirety with the following: 

The Dimensional Requirements and Design Standards for an Independent Living Residence 
development shall not be subject to the standards in the underlying zoning districts unless otherwise 
provided herein, but shall conform to the following standards: 

1. Minimum Parcel Size. The minimum parcel size for an independent living project shall be 43,560 
square feet, subject to other applicable minimum standards set by State and Federal law. 

2. Density. The maximum allowable density shall be five thousand square feet of lot area per 
Independent Living Residence unit in SRA and SRB, with a maximum 60 units per independent 
living development. In SRC, the maximum allowable density shall be ten thousand square feet of 
lot area per Independent Living Residence unit with a maximum 50 units per independent living 
development. 

3. Building Height. The construction of a new building containing one or more new Independent 
Living Residence unit shall not exceed forty-five feet in height as measured in accordance with the 
State Building Code in SRA and SRB, or thirty-five feet in SRC. The reuse, renovation or 
addition to structures existing as of the date of the adoption of this bylaw amendment may exceed 
the height limitation above but shall not exceed the height of such structures existing as of the date 
of adoption of this bylaw amendment. 



Building Coverage. The maximum building coverage, including accessory buildings, shall not 
exceed thirty percent (30%) of the lot area for new construction or expansion of existing 
structures. 

Building Setbacks. All buildings shall be set back a minimum of twenty feet from all property 
lines. This section does not preclude the reuse and renovation of existing structures which may 
not meet this setback as of the date of adoption of this bylaw amendment. The minimum 
separation distance between buildings shall be twenty feet. 

Minimum Lot Frontage. The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the requirements of the 
district where such use is located. As part of the grant of a Special Permit under Section 7.4.2, the 
Planning Board may reduce the frontage requirement to not less than 40 feet of frontage on a 
public way, provided that a suitable private access road into the site area can be constructed with 
the reduced frontage in a manner deemed adequate for emergency vehicles. 

166 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

7. Town Services. Any new development of Independent Living Residence units shall be serviced 
by public water of sufficient capacity to serve the project. If no public sewer is available and on- 
site sewage disposal systems are to be used, an inspection and maintenance plan shall be 
submitted to the Andover Board of Health for approval prior to occupancy of any unit. If the 
proposed development is proposed to have common dining facilities, the site shall be serviced by 
public sewer of sufficient capacity to serve the project. Any extension and/or replacement of 
sewer and/or water lines necessary to provide sufficient capacity shall be the responsibility of the 
applicant. 

8. Common Open Space. In all new independent living developments there shall be an area of 
common open space equal to at least thirty percent (30%) of the lot area. The common open space 
shall be retained in perpetuity for conservation or passive recreation use. No more than fifty 
percent (50%) of the minimum required open space shall be situated within wetlands. A 
permanent conservation restriction running to or enforceable by the Town shall be recorded for the 
common open space area and shall include restrictions that the land be retained in perpetuity for 
conservation and/or passive recreation. Such restriction shall be in a form and substance as the 
Planning Board shall prescribe including the management of said conservation restriction by the 
Andover Conservation Commission, Trustees of Reservations, Andover Village Improvement 
Society, or other agency or body, all as subject to the approval of the Planning Board. 

9. Parking. The minimum number of parking spaces provided on the lot shall be 2 parking spaces 
per independent living unit. The Planning Board, at its discretion, may require additional parking 
spaces to serve the needs of visitors and/or service vehicles. 

10. Access and On-Site Circulation. Adequate on-site circulation shall be provided to and from the 
site, taking into consideration the adjacent sidewalks and streets and accessibility of the site and 
building(s) thereon for emergency vehicles. Adequate provision shall be made for off-street 
loading and unloading requirements of delivery vehicles and passengers using private 
transportation. 

1 1 . Landscaping. Landscaping and screening is required to obscure visibility from beyond the 
boundaries of the premises of parking areas, dumpster locations and loading areas. The minimum 
setback from all property lines of such parking lots, dumpster locations and loading areas except 
for their points of ingress and egress, shall be ten feet. 



12. Affordable Component. For all new independent living developments, there shall be a percentage 

of the dwelling units set aside for persons that will be affordable to those households earning no 

more than 80% of the area median income, as defined by the United States Department of Housing 

and Urban Development (HUD). For site densities of four units per acre or less, the number of 

affordable units in said developments shall represent at least 10% of the total. For site densities of 

more than four units per acre, the number of affordable units in said developments shall represent 

at least 15% of the total. All new affordable dwelling units shall be subject to an affordability 

restriction described in a deed rider, restrictive covenant, or other document approved by the 

Planning Board and shall be recorded at the Registry of Deeds or the Land Court. The 

affordability restriction shall restrict occupancy of the dwelling units to qualified persons in 

perpetuity or for the longest period allowed by law to enable said affordable unit to quality for the 

Town's subsidized affordable housing inventory in accordance with the regulations and guidance 

of the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development. Nothing in the 

affordability restrictions shall conflict with generally accepted financing standards or 

Massachusetts law. 

167 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

13. Afie Restriction. All dwellings in a new independent living development shall be subject to an 
age restriction described in a deed rider, restrictive covenant, or other document approved by the 
Planning Board and consistent with Federal and State fair housing laws and requirements, and 
shall be recorded at the Registry of Deeds or the Land Court. The age restriction shall restrict 
occupancy of the dwelling units to persons of at least the age of 55 or older, and their spouses and 
children, consistent with Federal and State fair housing laws and requirements. In the event of the 
death of a qualifying owner/occupant, the surviving spouse of a qualifying owner/occupant, 
regardless of age, shall be allowed to remain until death or remarriage to a non-qualifying 
individual consistent with Federal and State fair housing laws and requirements. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Willard D. Perkins and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town WITHDRAW Article 53 by a 
Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $250,000 for the purpose of paying costs of 
reconstructing the following Town-owned bridges and bridge abutments on the Shawsheen River: the 
Essex Street Bridge, the Andover Street Bridge, the Stevens Street Bridge, the Balmoral Street Bridge and 
the Central Street Bridge, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to 
meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow 
said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (4) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of 5250,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of reconstructing the following Town-owned bridges and bridge abutments on the 
Shawsheen River: Essex Street Bridge; Andover Street Bridge; Stevens Street Bridge; Balmoral Street 
Bridge; and Central Street Bridge, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; 
and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and 
hereby is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (4) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 



Article 54 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available, or by any 
combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purposes of engaging the 
services of environmental consultants to perform a mass salt balance analysis in the Fish Brook and 
Haggetts Pond watershed areas and issue a report of recommendations to protect the public health, safety 
and quality of life in the community of Andover, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Health 
168 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 55 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $20,000 from Water Reserves by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee: Approval 

Health Department: Approval 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to request the legislature to enact 
special legislation in accordance with Article 97 of the Articles of Amendment to the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth and notwithstanding General Laws Chapter 30B, Chapter 30, Chapter 149 or any general 
or special law to the contrary, to (1) authorize the Town to grant a temporary construction easement to 
Yvon Cormier Construction Corp., a Massachusetts corporation for the purpose of constructing an 
underground sewer line through the William M. Wood Memorial Park shown as Parcel 6 on Assessors 
Map 53 and (2) change the use of the William M. Wood Memorial Park on a temporary basis to allow 
construction of an underground sewer line through said Park and allow the construction of an 
underground sewer line through the William M. Wood Memorial Park by Yvon Cormier Construction 
Corp., all of which is to be done with no Town funds to be used for construction of the underground 
sewer line through the William M. Wood Memorial Park, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that Article 56 be approved as published in Warrant. 

Article 56 was approved. 

VOTE: YES: 201 NO: 58 A Majority vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $150,000 from Article 4, 2003 Annual 
Town Meeting - Plant and Facilities Capital Projects Fund - and appropriate $150,000 for the purpose of 
remodeling, constructing, reconstructing, or making extraordinary repairs to the DPW and Plant and 
Facilities buildings at the existing Town Yard off Lewis Street and/or at Spring Grove Cemetery 
including costs incidental and related or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the town transfer the sum of 
$ 150,000 from Article 4, 2002 Annual Town Meeting- Plant and Facilities Capital Projects Fund and 
appropriate $150,000 for the purpose of remodeling, constructing, reconstructing, or making 
extraordinary repairs to the DPW and Plant and Facilities buildings at the existing Town Yard off Lewis 
Street including costs incidental and related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to accept Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 
55C establishing a municipal affordable housing trust fund or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Housing Partnership Committee 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 58 be approved as printed in Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to permit Raytheon Company to design, construct and 
maintain a traffic signal system in compliance with State and Town regulations. Proposed signals would 
be installed at the entrance to the property at 350 Lowell Street (Route 133) in Andover or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On petition of Stephen Knott and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town permit Raytheon 
Company, at its cost and no cost to the Town, to design, construct and maintain a traffic signal system at 
the entrance to the property at 350 Lowell Street (Route 133), so long as Raytheon Company occupies the 
premises at said property, with said design and construction to be all in compliance with applicable state 
and Town laws, bylaws and regulations, and subject to final approval by the Board of Selectmen of the 
design and location before any construction commences, and on the further condition that should 
Raytheon Company no longer occupy the premises at said property, Raytheon Company shall, at the 
written direction of the Board of Selectman, within 120 days remove said traffic signal elements at its cost 
and no cost to the Town. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to authorize, but not require, an intermunicipal agreement 
for a term not to exceed twenty-five years, pursuant to M.G. L. Chapter 40, Section 4A, as amended, with 
the House of Atreus Realty Trust and the Town of Tewksbury and the City of Lowell, (unless the 
Selectmen determine that the City of Lowell does not need to be a party), whereby the Town of 
Tewksbury will provide sewer services, and be paid by the landowners for such services, to Lots 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 25, 27 and 29 Crystal Circle which lots are located in the Town of Andover, with all such 
lots shown on a Plan of Land which is on file with the Town Clerk's Office, depicting the Crystal Circle 
Subdivision which is located in both Andover and Tewksbury, Massachusetts and to authorize, but not 

require, the Board of Selectmen, as the Sewer Commissioners and the Town Manager to enter into such 
an intermunicipal agreement in their discretion upon such terms and conditions as they may deem 
appropriate including requiring said sewers to be constructed in total and operational by January 1, 2007 
or the agreement is null and void, the Town of Tewksbury will indemnify, defend and hold harmless the 
Town of Andover for all claims relating to the sewer line and sewer backup in the lots in Andover and a 
perpetual deed restriction for such lots stating that the Town of Andover shall have no responsibility 
whatsoever for the construction or maintenance of such sewers or the collection of payment for such 
sewer services or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town WITHDRAW Article 60 by a 
Majority vote. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote 

to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 9:20 P.M. 

170 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 26, May 2, 2005 

A true record 

ATTEST 



- /{auc/*^ ^ Md/tif7ty 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



171 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, September 2, 2005, The Inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the Field House, 
Andover High School, on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

TUESDAY September 27, 2005 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 

Constable 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1 129 voters admitted to the meeting. 

James D. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:17 P.M. 

Rev. Thomas McMillan, West Parish Church, 129 Reservation Road, offered the opening prayer. 

Ted Teichert, Chairman, Board of Selectman, led the salute to the flag. 

It was voted unanimous consent to admit 85 non-voters to the meeting and allow non-voters to 
be escorted to the non-voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Collins Center and to turn 
off cell phones. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the stage participants to meeting members. 

The Moderator announced the voting sections of the Hall. 

The Moderator announced the use of Pro and Con microphones for Article 1 and explained the 
procedure for the use of Pro and Con microphones. 

The Moderator recognized Peggy Kruse, President of the League of Women Voters, who moved 
that for this Town Meeting a time limit of three minutes per speaker be imposed. The sponsors 
of the article will not be subject to the time limit. Those speakers needing additional time may 
appeal to the Moderator from the floor. 

The motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

172 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum not to exceed $7,650,000 for the 
purpose of paying costs of constructing a Senior Center on the parcel of Town-owned land 
located at 56 Bartlet Street, including the costs of plans, project administration, site development, 
parking, utilities, original equipment, furnishings, parking and circulation improvements to the 
adjacent municipal campus containing the Town Offices, School Administration and Doherty 
Middle School Buildings and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements by gift, by purchase, by 
eminent domain or otherwise; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clause (3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore; provided, however, that no amounts shall be 
borrowed or expended hereunder unless and until the Town shall have voted at a Town Election 
to exempt the amounts required to pay any bonds or notes authorized by this vote from the 
provisions of Proposition 2>4, so-called, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Dorothy L. Bresnahan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $6,850,000 be appropriated 
for the purpose of paying costs of constructing a Senior Center on the parcel of Town-owned 
land located at 56 Bartlet Street, including the costs of plans, project administration, site 
development, parking, utilities, original equipment, furnishings, parking and circulation 
improvements to the adjacent municipal campus containing the Town Offices, School 
Administration, and Doherty Middle School Buildings and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; that the Board of Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to acquire 
any necessary easements for this project by gift, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise; 
that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
and hereby is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 
(3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefore; provided however, that no amounts shall be borrowed or expended 
hereunder unless and until the Town shall have voted at a Town Election to exempt the amounts 
required to pay any bonds or notes authorized by this vote from the provisions of Proposition 254, 
so-called. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to close debate. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Article 1 was DEFEATED by less than a 2/3 VOTE 

VOTE: YES: 643 NO: 444 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, control and 
management of a parcel of land containing 28,340 square feet more or less shown as Parcel A on 
a plan entitled "Exhibit Plan of Land in Andover, MA" by Hancock Survey Associates, Inc., 
dated January 20, 2005, to the Board of Selectmen for municipal purposes, said plan being on 
file in the Office of the Town Clerk, and if a Senior Center is not built on said property, then the 
land shall revert back to the School Committee, ]dJ3take any other action related thereto. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

On petition of Dorothy L. Bresnahan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 2 by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School Committee to grant, and the 
Board of Selectmen to accept, any and all easements in and across real property at Doherty 
Middle School in order to construct and operate a Senior Center, including but not limited to 
easements for drainage, utilities, access, grading and communications or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of Dorothy L. Bresnahan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 3 by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4.1.3. (Exceptions and Special 
Requirements) of the Andover Zoning Bylaw by adding a new Section 4.1.3.5. as follows: "5. 
Municipal Senior Center. Land and structures used for a municipal senior center are exempt 
from the lot area, frontage, building setback and off-street parking and loading requirements of 
this bylaw." or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Dorothy L. Bresnahan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 4 by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $800,000 from the Wood 
Trust Fund for the purpose of paying costs of constructing a Senior Center on the parcel of 
Town-owned land located at 56 Bartlet Street, including the costs of plans, project 
administration, site development, parking, utilities, original equipment, furnishings, parking and 
circulation improvements to the adjacent municipal campus containing the Town Offices, School 
Administration and Doherty Middle School Buildings and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 5 by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to establish an Affordable Housing Trust, pursuant 
to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 55C, which shall contain the following 
terms and conditions: 

ARTICLE FIRST: Name of the Trust 

The trust shall be called the "Town of Andover Affordable Housing Trust Fund". 

ARTICLE SECOND: Purpose 

The purpose of the Trust shall be to provide for the preservation and creation of affordable 

housing in the Town of Andover for the benefit of low and moderate income households. In 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

furtherance of this purpose, the Trustees are hereby authorized, in accordance with the 
procedures set forth herein, to acquire by gift, purchase or otherwise real estate and personal 
property, both tangible and intangible, of every sort and description; to use such property, both 
real and personal, in such manner as the Trustees shall deem most appropriate to carry out such 
purpose, provided however, that all property held by the Trust and the net earnings thereof shall 
be used exclusively for the preservation and creation in the Town of Andover of affordable 
housing for the purposes for which this Trust was formed. 

ARTICLE THIRD: Tenure of Trustees 

There shall be a Board of Trustees consisting of not less than five nor more than seven Trustees 
who shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. One of the Trustees shall be the Town 
Manager. Only persons who are residents of the Town of Andover shall be eligible to hold the 
office of Trustee. Trustees shall serve for a term of two years, except that two of the initial 
trustee appointments shall be for a term of one year, and may be re-appointed at the discretion of 
the Board of Selectmen. Any Trustee who ceases to be a resident of the Town of Andover shall 
cease to be a Trustee hereunder and shall promptly provide a written notification of the change in 
residence to the Board and to the Town Clerk. Any Trustee may resign by written instrument 
signed and acknowledged by such Trustee and duly filed with the Town Clerk. If a Trustee shall 
die, resign, or for any other reason cease to be a Trustee hereunder before his/her term of office 
expires, a successor shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen to fill such vacancy provided 
that in each case the said appointment and acceptance in writing by the Trustee so appointed is 
filed with the Town Clerk. No such appointment shall be required so long as there are five 
Trustees in office. Upon the appointment of any succeeding Trustee and the filing of such 
appointment the title to the Trust estate shall thereupon and without the necessity of any 
conveyance be vested in such succeeding Trustee jointly with the remaining Trustees. Reference 
to the Trustee shall mean the Trustee or Trustees for the time being hereunder. 

ARTICLE FOURTH: Meetings of the Trust 

The Trust shall meet at least quarterly al such time and at such place as the Trustees shall 
determine. Notice of all meetings of the Trust shall be given in accordance with the provisions of 
the Open Meeting Law, G.L. Chapter 39. Sections 23A, 23B and 23C. A quorum at any meeting 
shall be a majority of the Trustees qualified and present in person. 

ARTICLE FIFTH: Powers of Trustees 

The Board of Trustees shall have the following powers which shall be carried out in accordance 

with and in furtherance of the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 55C: 

(1) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to accept and receive property, whether 
real or personal, by gift, grant, devise, or transfer from any person, firm, corporation or other 
public or private entity, including without limitation, grants of funds or other property tendered 
to the trust in connection with provisions of any zoning by-law or any other by-law; 

(2) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to purchase and retain real or personal 
property, including without restriction investments that yield a high rate of income or no income; 

(3) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen and Town Meeting, to sell, lease, exchange, 
transfer or convey any real property at public auction or by private contract for such 
consideration and on such terms as to credit or otherwise, and to make such contracts and enter 
into such undertakings relative to trust real property as the Trustees deem advisable 
notwithstanding the length of any such lease or $0gtract; 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

(4) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to sell, lease, exchange, transfer, or convey 
any personal property at public auction or by private contract for such consideration and on such 
terms as to credit or otherwise, and to make such contracts and enter into such undertakings 
relative to trust personal property notwithstanding the length of any such lease or contract; 

(5) to execute, acknowledge and deliver deeds, assignments, transfers, pledges, leases, 
covenants, contracts, promissory notes, releases and other instruments sealed or unsealed, 
necessary, proper or incident to any transaction in which the board engages for the 
accomplishment of the purposes of the trust; 

(6) to employ advisors and agents, such as accountants, appraisers and lawyers as the trustees 
deem necessary; 

(7) to pay reasonable compensation and expenses to all advisors and agents and to apportion 
such compensation between income and principal as the trustees deem advisable; 

(8) to apportion receipts and charges between income and principal as the trustees deem 
advisable, to amortize premiums and establish sinking funds for such purpose, and to create 
reserves for depreciation depletion or otherwise; 

(9) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to participate in any reorganization, 
recapitalization, merger or similar transactions; and to give proxies or powers of attorney with or 
without power of substitution, to vote any securities or certificates of interest, and to consent to 
any contract, lease, mortgage, purchase or sale of property, by or between any corporation and 
any other corporation or person; 

( 1 0) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to deposit any security with any protective 
reorganization committee, and to delegate to such committee such powers and authority with 
relation thereto as the trustees may deem proper and to pay, out of trust property, such portion of 
expenses and compensation of such committee as the board, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, may deem necessary and appropriate; 

(11) to carry property for accounting purposes other than acquisition date values; 

(12) with the approval the Board of Selectmen and the approval of Town Meeting by a two- 
thirds majority vote, to incur debt, to borrow money on such terms and conditions and from such 
sources as the trustees deem advisable, and to mortgage and pledge trust assets as collateral; 

(13) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to disburse trust funds for the purpose of 
making loans or grants in furtherance of the creation or preservation of affordable housing in 
Andover upon such terms as the Trustees shall deem most appropriate to carry out such 
purposes; 

(14) to make distributions or divisions of principal in kind; 

(15) to comprise, attribute, defend, enforce, release, settle or otherwise adjust claims in favor 
or against the trust, including claims for taxes, and to accept any property, either in total or 
partial satisfaction of any indebtedness or other obligation, and subject to the provisions of G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 55C, to continue to hold the same for such period of time as the board may 
deem appropriate; 

176 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

(16) to manage or improve real property and, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen and 
Town Meeting, to abandon any property which the trustees determine not to be worth retaining; 

(17) to hold all or part of the trust property uninvested for such purposes and for such time as 
the trustees may deem appropriate; and 

(18) to extend the time for payment of any obligation to the trust. 

ARTICLE SIXTH: Funds Paid to the Trust 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, all moneys paid to the trust in 
accordance with any zoning by-law, exaction fee, or private contribution shall be paid directly 
into the trust and need not be appropriated or accepted and approved into the trust. General 
revenues appropriated into the trust become trust property and these funds need not be further 
appropriated to be expended. All moneys remaining in the trust at the end of any fiscal year, 
whether or not expended by the board within one year of the date they were appropriated into the 
trust, remain trust property. 

ARTICLE SEVENTH: Acts of Trustees 

A majority of Trustees may exercise any or all of the powers of the Trustees hereunder and may 
execute on behalf of the Trustees any and all instruments with the same effect as though 
executed by all the Trustees. No Trustee shall be required to give bond. No license of court 
shall be required to confirm the validity of any transaction entered into by the Trustees with 
respect to the Trust Estate. 

ARTICLE EIGHTH: Liability 

Neither the Trustees nor any agent or officer of the Trust shall have the authority to bind the 
Town, except in the manner specifically authorized herein. The Trust is a public employer and 
the Trustees are public employees for the purposes of G.L. Chapter 268A. The Trust shall be 
deemed a municipal agency and the Trustees special municipal employees for the purposes of 
G.L. Chapter 268A. 

ARTICLE NINTH: Taxes 

The Trust is exempt from G.L. Chapter 59 and 62, and from any other provisions concerning 
payment of taxes based upon or measured by property or income imposed by the Commonwealth 
or any subdivision thereto. 

ARTICLE TENTH: Custodian of Funds 

The Town Treasurer shall be the custodian of the funds of the Trust. The books and records of 
the Trust shall be audited annually by an independent auditor in accordance with accepted 
accounting practices for municipalities. 

ARTICLE ELEVENTH: Governmental Body 

The Trust is a governmental body for purposes of Sections 23 A, 23B and 23C of G.L. Chapter 

39. 

ARTICLE TWELFTH: Board of the Town 

The Trust is a board of the Town for purposes of G.L. Chapter 30B and Section 15A of G.L. 
Chapter 40; but agreements and conveyances between the trust and agencies, boards, 
commissions, authorities, departments and public instrumentalities of the town shall be exempt 
from said Chapter 3 OB. 1 77 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 27, 2005 

ARTICLE THIRTEENTH: Duration of the Trust 

This Trust shall be of indefinite duration, until terminated in accordance with applicable law. 
Upon termination of the Trust, subject to the payment of or making provisions for the payment 
of all obligations and liabilities of the Trust and the Trustees, the net assets of the Trust shall be 
transferred to the Town and held by the Board of Selectmen for affordable housing purposes. In 
making any such distribution, the Trustees may, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, sell all or any portion of the Trust property and distribute the net proceeds thereof or 
they may distribute any of the assets in kind. The powers of the Trustees shall continue until the 
affairs of the Trust are concluded. 

ARTICLE FOURTEENTH 

The Board of Selectmen may authorize the Trustees to execute, deliver, and record with the 

Registry of Deeds any documents required for any conveyance authorized hereunder. 

ARTICLE FIFTEENTH: Titles 

The titles to the various Articles herein are for convenience only and are not to be considered 

part of said Articles nor shall they affect the meaning or the language of any such Article. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 6 was moved as printed in the Warrant and was 
approved by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Lrbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote 
to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:50 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



-/w^; ^^^ 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



178 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTfcET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 




Ted E. Teichert 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 



Repaid S. Stapczyhski * (W 



Repaid S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 






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179